A220 dfw-lga-dfw & fear of flying

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Old Apr 26, 19, 4:57 pm
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Originally Posted by jdrtravel View Post
Apparently it should be more stable with some type of new technology to avoid turbulence, see my post above.
Don’t be fooled. Each airline has their own proprietary weather products. There’s no no new technology to avoid turbulence, only better weather predicting products and improved communication between dispatch and other aircraft.

United it’s called TAPS, we can see automated turbulence reports from other aircraft that automatically pop up on our iPads. This is in addition to the other government and WSI provided weather data.

Last edited by clubord; Apr 26, 19 at 5:04 pm
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Old Apr 26, 19, 8:04 pm
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My wife happened to fly on one of the first A220 LGA-DFW flights—I think it was maybe the 2nd or 3rd day of operation. She said the plane was comfortable, and she thought it was funny there was a window in the bathroom.
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Old Apr 26, 19, 9:28 pm
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The A220 is a mainline aircraft, not a regional.
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Old Apr 26, 19, 9:51 pm
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Originally Posted by clubord View Post


Don’t be fooled. Each airline has their own proprietary weather products. There’s no no new technology to avoid turbulence, only better weather predicting products and improved communication between dispatch and other aircraft.

United it’s called TAPS, we can see automated turbulence reports from other aircraft that automatically pop up on our iPads. This is in addition to the other government and WSI provided weather data.
OK, however, according to reports DL has done a notably better job at it.
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Old Apr 27, 19, 5:24 am
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Originally Posted by fast passenger View Post
My wife happened to fly on one of the first A220 LGA-DFW flights—I think it was maybe the 2nd or 3rd day of operation. She said the plane was comfortable, and she thought it was funny there was a window in the bathroom.
Best airplane bathroom in the sky for tall people, not even close.

Great aircraft, Airbus got an amazing deal on a great aircraft that Boeing was trying to kill.
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Old Apr 27, 19, 6:15 am
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Originally Posted by jdrtravel View Post
OK, however, according to reports DL has done a notably better job at it.
That's funny you're buying into those reports. When all the other airlines start requesting the same altitude as Delta because of their magic software programs I'll be the first one to agree with you!

However, the reality is that all airlines fly on the same airways and within the same altitude range due to the airspace/aircraft performance limitations. We find the smoothest rides through speaking with air traffic control and other airplanes in front of us - still is the most accurate source of information. Within the past few years there has been additional resources added where each airplane provides automated turbulence reporting that gets transmitted real time to each pilot's ipad. Each airline has this technology. Delta may rank it 0-100, United 0.1-1.0, American 1-5. Point is, its prevalent throughout the industry.

Not trying to cause an argument here rather infusing some definitive facts into the discussion.
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Old Apr 27, 19, 8:57 am
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This thread is wandering a bit. Unless the OP is ready to change flights on short notice ($$$ flexible fare, or struggles with SDC in low fare classes), forecasts of turbulence won't be helpful. It's really of question of other aircraft available on a Dallas-NYC route (Delta E70/CR9, Spirit A320, AA 738/A321/767, Southwest 737-700, UA E70/319/320) and if the A220 is noticeably inferior to those. That's tough to answer.
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Old Apr 27, 19, 9:01 am
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Originally Posted by sydneyracquelle View Post
My SO is also a fearful flyer. We always fly in the mornings in the summer months to avoid afternoon thunderstorms. No guaranty obviously but morning travel might make you more comfortable, especially between NYC and DFW.
There's another reason to fly in the morning -- not just to avoid thunderstorms. In fact, you can avoid most of the convective updrafts/downdrafts ("thermals") by flying in the early morning. These thermals can be felt upon takeoff on a sunny day.

This isn't meant to scare OP, the A220 is an awesome aircraft and Delta is quite good at avoiding a lot of turbulence.
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Old Apr 27, 19, 11:53 am
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Maybe find a local flight school and do at least a discovery flight. it's amazing what an up-front perspective can do.
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Old Apr 27, 19, 12:34 pm
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Originally Posted by 3Cforme View Post
This thread is wandering a bit. Unless the OP is ready to change flights on short notice ($$$ flexible fare, or struggles with SDC in low fare classes), forecasts of turbulence won't be helpful. It's really of question of other aircraft available on a Dallas-NYC route (Delta E70/CR9, Spirit A320, AA 738/A321/767, Southwest 737-700, UA E70/319/320) and if the A220 is noticeably inferior to those. That's tough to answer.
I think the discussion about whether Delta has better forecasts of turbulence than the competition are directly relevant to OP’s decision on which of the airline options you listed they should book. Delta claims they have better turbulence avoidance solutions than other airlines, which is a debatable claim with both pro and con arguments. Delta also marketed the A220 with references to this solution, so discussion of whether the A220’s version is different than other aircraft is equally relevant, IMHO.

Also, once OP’s flight is booked, turbulence forecasts available to the public can still be helpful for a fearful flyer to know what to expect on their flight, even if there aren’t a lot of alternate options. Also, keep in mind that if weather is severe enough, there may also be a weather waiver that would allow for routing changes without a penalty.
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Old Apr 28, 19, 8:30 am
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Originally Posted by webmarks View Post
Maybe find a local flight school and do at least a discovery flight. it's amazing what an up-front perspective can do.
Came here to suggest exactly the same.

I'm a private pilot, and my spouse had a slight fear of flying when we met. After one or two flights in a 4 seat single engine plane, her fear of flying (in planes large and small) largely went away. Being able to see what's going on up front, hear the ATC communication, understand the controls, and know how turbulence is handled really put her at ease.

Now she looks at turbulence like a bumpy road, like going from a smooth highway, to NYC asphalt with potholes, to gravel, to rutted up dirt roads, etc. That's a good way to think about it. While some turbulence can be dangerous, if one stays in their seat with seatbelt fastened, there's very very little to worry about.

Like the poster above said, most flight schools offer a "Discovery" flight where anyone can show up, with no experience, and go up in a small plane with an instructor for 30-60 minutes. They'll be explained how things work, and even given an opportunity to fly the plane. It doesn't cost much, won't take long, and gives great insight into how safe everything really is.
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