Nut Allergy Early Boarding

Old Nov 8, 18, 12:17 pm
  #16  
 
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Originally Posted by vincentharris View Post
it seems like DL has kept this pretty hidden.
Doubt they are keeping it hidden. Passengers needing special assistance covers a lot.

Would you expect them to announce the reason each person needs extra time. Oh... they could do it as they are boarding like a talent show.... and miss Betty had a hip replacement last month at the young age of 83, George here is almost blind but still attractes the ladies and Jack has a peanut allergy.

Sorry, people are saying the thread will be closed, I thought I better get a laugh in first.

I for one am just glad there aren't nuts in the Delta cookies, so I can have those regardless of the flight being nut free.
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Old Nov 8, 18, 1:03 pm
  #17  
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Originally Posted by SecurityTheaterFanClubPresident View Post
In a past life, an employee of mine had a severe peanut allergy (as in, she would die). When I traveled with her she would be afforded early boarding to wipe/clean the seat before sitting down. Obviously they also wouldn't serve peanuts on flights that she was on. She informed Delta of her allergy in the special assistance section that you probably skip right over when you book a ticket (I know I do).
You can also notify them of your nut allergy after you book your ticket. IIRC, there is a special assistance area there as well and that's what I used.
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Old Nov 8, 18, 5:08 pm
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My daughter has a severe nut allergy and she and my wife have been pre-boarding for years to wipe down the seat and tray table. We are appreciative of their accommodation although have encountered a few rolled eyes. I probably wouldnít understand it as well either if it wasnít my daughter, but the risk is real and those with children in this situation hear tragic stories all too often.

When you look at it like a 6 year old - she views what could be on her seat as cyanide. She know it wonít kill her on contact, but I bet youíd wipe it off the tray table before you ate.
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Old Nov 8, 18, 9:14 pm
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I am not trying to be rude at all, but what did everyone do before this was allowed? Stay home?

I once flew BS on WN, and was A-1, the guy standing in front of me was going to board early with his son to wipe the seats down. On southwest, the airline known universally for peanuts. He said his kid was deathly allergic. I asked why southwest? He said it was cheaper.....

all I could think of was Darwin.
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Old Nov 8, 18, 10:02 pm
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Itís not rude, just ignorant.

Almost every action carries a personal risk calculation. Everyoneís threshold is different. Do you put a seatbelt on always? Drive a car in the pouring rain? Skip a flu shot? Go inside when lighting is in the area? All odds. Life experience makes out threshold different even though odds may the same. Flying with allergy is the same. Makes people feel better with the increased perceived odds to do something. The perceived decreases odds of reaction by wiping the seat is their choice. So is the known increased odds of flying southwest. I donít and wonít with my daughter. Donít judge.


Originally Posted by SJWarrior View Post
I am not trying to be rude at all, but what did everyone do before this was allowed? Stay home?

I once flew BS on WN, and was A-1, the guy standing in front of me was going to board early with his son to wipe the seats down. On southwest, the airline known universally for peanuts. He said his kid was deathly allergic. I asked why southwest? He said it was cheaper.....

all I could think of was Darwin.
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Old Nov 9, 18, 12:47 am
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Read that Sementis (Australian firm), which is developing a vaccine to treat peanut allergy, has completed proof-of-concept studies for it.

If it's successful, we can perhaps soon be judging parents who refuse it for their children.

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Old Nov 9, 18, 7:00 am
  #22  
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Originally Posted by SJWarrior View Post
I am not trying to be rude at all, but what did everyone do before this was allowed? Stay home?

I once flew BS on WN, and was A-1, the guy standing in front of me was going to board early with his son to wipe the seats down. On southwest, the airline known universally for peanuts. He said his kid was deathly allergic. I asked why southwest? He said it was cheaper.....

all I could think of was Darwin.
My allergy has increased in severity as I've aged. When I was young, I could accidentally eat nuts, take prescription allergy meds, and sleep it off as the meds made me sleepy. As an adult, I've ended up in the hospital because of my allergy. I now carry Epi-Pens with me everywhere, especially on flights. I work two blocks from a hospital ER and I still have Epi-Pens with me at work. My coworkers know how to use them and are aware that it's not quite like Pulp Fiction.
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Old Nov 9, 18, 8:06 am
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Originally Posted by vincentharris View Post
I am actually asking a serious question in that how does DL handle this? As i said originally I have never seen anyone but wheelchairs and strollers go in pre board, and on the DL site you can check you have a nut allergy during booking. Has anyone ever seen anyone not with a stroller/wheelchair pre board that MIGHT be cleaning their seat? It says DL was first but it seems like DL has kept this pretty hidden.
You have to tell Delta at the gate. They will then make an announcment and allow you to board early to sanitize the area.
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Old Nov 9, 18, 8:11 am
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https://patient.info/health/food-all...ce/nut-allergy

thought this link may help educate some people on the thread.
All the humour aside, Iíve seen my daughter hospitalised through her peanut allergy - and its not something Iíd wish on anyone. The furor around this is incredible in my opinion. Bottom line, we all know people can die from this. Can we not be a little more tolerant - I can assure you, no-one with a peanut allergy is happy to have it - early boarding or not ...
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Old Nov 9, 18, 8:16 am
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Originally Posted by ethernal View Post
Peanut allergies are triggered by the proteins found on the peanuts. These proteins do not persist in the air in quantities sufficient to trigger a reaction. A person must generally physically touch peanuts or peanut dust to have a realistic chance of having a reaction. A plane is no worse or better than a train in that regard. Risk is minimal unless a person is physically co-located to the peanut consumption in question.

The risk is just a high - if not higher - that a passenger on a previous plane had peanuts and left peanut reside at the person's seat (this is the idea behind wiping down the tray table).

No one will have a reaction from someone eating peanuts a few rows ahead or behind them.
I'm glad you posted this. For me, it's educational. And I have a question: is the protein also on the shell? And since you posted peanuts is the allergy the same for all nuts?

Lastly, how would I recognize the reaction (supposing I'm nearby) and what could I do to help?
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Old Nov 9, 18, 2:08 pm
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Originally Posted by davedimes View Post
Itís not rude, just ignorant.

Almost every action carries a personal risk calculation. Everyoneís threshold is different. Do you put a seatbelt on always? Drive a car in the pouring rain? Skip a flu shot? Go inside when lighting is in the area? All odds. Life experience makes out threshold different even though odds may the same. Flying with allergy is the same. Makes people feel better with the increased perceived odds to do something. The perceived decreases odds of reaction by wiping the seat is their choice. So is the known increased odds of flying southwest. I donít and wonít with my daughter. Donít judge.



I have food allergies to where I carry epi-pens. Not to peanuts. If it was, I sure as hell would not fly southwest. I refer it to as personal responsibility that no one really wants to do it anymore. Fly an airline like Delta or one not know for flying you for peanuts!

I avoid the places or try to restrict where I go. But thatís just me. I exhibit personal responsibility, and try not to burden others with my personal poor choices.

But hey, I guess that make me ignorant.
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Old Nov 9, 18, 2:19 pm
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Originally Posted by SJWarrior View Post
I have food allergies to where I carry epi-pens. Not to peanuts. If it was, I sure as hell would not fly southwest. I refer it to as personal responsibility that no one really wants to do it anymore. Fly an airline like Delta or one not know for flying you for peanuts!
If the carrier says they will make accommodations for allergies, and has a way to request that in advance, then isn't requesting it in advance exactly the definition of taking steps to ensure your own comfort and health?

Originally Posted by SJWarrior View Post
I avoid the places or try to restrict where I go. But thatís just me. I exhibit personal responsibility
Kinda sad that you so willingly accept a reduced range of life experience.

I'm curious, do you feel people in wheelchairs should exhibit personal responsibility and just avoid inaccessible public places, so that building owners don't have to be burdened with building ramps and elevators?

Originally Posted by SJWarrior View Post
, and try not to burden others with my personal poor choices.

But hey, I guess that make me ignorant. [/left]
Ah, so you chose to have food allergies that require you to carry epi-pens? I'm sure I'm not the only one intrigued to hear the details behind that story.
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Old Nov 9, 18, 2:48 pm
  #28  
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Originally Posted by TheBigRat View Post
https://patient.info/health/food-all...ce/nut-allergy

thought this link may help educate some people on the thread.
All the humour aside, Iíve seen my daughter hospitalised through her peanut allergy - and its not something Iíd wish on anyone. The furor around this is incredible in my opinion. Bottom line, we all know people can die from this. Can we not be a little more tolerant - I can assure you, no-one with a peanut allergy is happy to have it - early boarding or not ...
seriously, I don't understand why anyone with any semblance of humanity would be mad about this. It's not going to lengthen the boarding process (some number of people move from one group to another), and most of the people covered by this were almost certainly already pre-boarding anyway. Even if people "abuse" this and falsely claim a peanut allergy, it's not going to actually negatively impact anyone.
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Old Nov 9, 18, 5:21 pm
  #29  
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Originally Posted by Zorak View Post
If the carrier says they will make accommodations for allergies, and has a way to request that in advance, then isn't requesting it in advance exactly the definition of taking steps to ensure your own comfort and health?
This gets to an interesting point of law in the Air Carrier Access Act: carriers can't require advance notice of disability (with exceptions for providing some services, like oxygen). If Delta is moving to treat peanut allergies as a disability there will be specific legal obligations.
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Old Nov 9, 18, 8:03 pm
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The point your missing is donít fly the airline known for peanuts! Cough up a couple extra bucks and avoid that airline.

But it if you choose not to avoid certain things, that can easily be avoided, then itís Darwinism. FFS
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