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Cuba for an American and Non American

Cuba for an American and Non American

Old Mar 3, 04, 6:38 pm
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Cuba for an American and Non American

My husband and I are considering taking a short trip to Cuba from Mexico. I have an Australian Passport and he has a US pssport.

From reading the other posts, it would seem that if he gets hassled by US customs on our return we can tell them that I paid for the trip, and as I am not a US citizen, there is nothing they can do.

Is this correct, or am I being too simplisitc?

We are also taking my Mum who is 70 years old. She is nervous about travelling, but really wants to see more of the world. Would Cuba be a good place to take her, without freaking her out too much

Any advice would be great
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Old Mar 4, 04, 9:31 pm
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I think you will be fine as long as your are going from a relatively large gateway city (e.g., Cancun). As of now there are no US customs officials in foreign airports (but they are looking at going). For a good reference with lots of good travel advice (from Aussies as well), check out cubamania.com. I'm not affiliated with the site, but found it to be the best Cuba site with quick answers out there. (I'm going in October legally and have done extensive online research).

Have a great trip & enjoy the culture.

- Matt
<font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size="2">Originally posted by Feebster:
My husband and I are considering taking a short trip to Cuba from Mexico. I have an Australian Passport and he has a US pssport.

From reading the other posts, it would seem that if he gets hassled by US customs on our return we can tell them that I paid for the trip, and as I am not a US citizen, there is nothing they can do.

Is this correct, or am I being too simplisitc?

We are also taking my Mum who is 70 years old. She is nervous about travelling, but really wants to see more of the world. Would Cuba be a good place to take her, without freaking her out too much

Any advice would be great
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Old Mar 9, 04, 10:46 pm
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<font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size="2">Originally posted by Feebster:
From reading the other posts, it would seem that if he gets hassled by US customs on our return we can tell them that I paid for the trip, and as I am not a US citizen, there is nothing they can do.

Is this correct, or am I being too simplisitc?
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The answer depends on your status. Assuming that you have NO ties to the US (no green card, no visa, no citizenship), then you may be in the clear.

I think that to travel there legally, your husband would have to be "fully hosted". You could have to prove that your assets are not co-mingled, if they decide to push it. Chances are they wouldn't, but you never know. With GWB looking to please the Cuban American voters, you may see things get much stricter in the near future.
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Old Jun 12, 04, 9:39 am
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Being a Canadian citizen I am legally entitled to visit Cuba. I now live in NYC but still maintain Canadian citizenship and passport - not an American citizen therefore making it possible to visit Cuba. I would assume that if YOU hold an Australian passport it would be ok for you to travel but if your husband holds an American passport it could be a problem.

Just make the flight up to YYZ (Toronto) which offers direct flights to Cuba. You will find it easier then flying US - Mexico - Cuba. Just my $ 0.02.

JP
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Old Jun 17, 04, 9:17 am
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It has been metioned before that one can ask the Cuban immigration people not to stamp one's passports - therefore no proof anywhere that you were in Cuba.

Also, there are direct CUN-HAV flights, as well as MEX-HAV flights.
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Old Jul 2, 04, 1:38 am
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Feebster's hubby here!
.
I think I fall through the cracks legally, and thus would be entitled to visit Cuba "legally." But I'm not a lawyer. And if I can get away with it, it would definitely be an oversight because my situation is quite unusual. Any legal opinions here would certainly be most welcome!

First of all, although I'm a U.S. citizen, my wife would be most willing to pay for my expenses in Cuba (at least stating so for U.S. Customs).

My wife is an Australian citizen and resident. We still haven't permanently gotten together since our marriage. My application for Australian residency is pending. Her earnings are strictly in Aussie dollars, and she has no status as a U.S. resident.

I understand that I'm OK if I don't spend U.S. dollars or equiv. earned here. Her Aussie dollars earned there have never been comingled with mine.

So LEGALLY, can I travel to Cuba??? Am I within the letter of the law???
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Old Jul 9, 04, 4:12 pm
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Originally Posted by Feebster
We are also taking my Mum who is 70 years old. She is nervous about travelling, but really wants to see more of the world. Would Cuba be a good place to take her, without freaking her out too much
I visited Cuba 8 times between 1995 and 2001. Most of these were short weekend trips. It was interesting in the early days and to see the changes that occurred over that period, less so towards the end. The big drawback was the food. Getting to know some decent private retaurants helped but it's not a "comfort" destination IMO.

My mother is an active 60 year old. I would bring her to Costa Rica, Chile, Argentina, Brazil but not Cuba.
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Old Apr 21, 06, 10:26 am
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Originally Posted by chtiet
It has been metioned before that one can ask the Cuban immigration people not to stamp one's passports - therefore no proof anywhere that you were in Cuba.
one can always ask... but they'll stamp the passport nonetheless (always on the same page in fact!).
but the odds must be infinitesimally low of being stopped on re-entry. as my husband likes to say, sometimes ya just takes yo chances.
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Old Apr 23, 06, 8:32 pm
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Originally Posted by PaulasPain
one can always ask... but they'll stamp the passport nonetheless (always on the same page in fact!).
When I was there in 2002, they did not stamp my passport. They gave me the tourist card (which I recall they stamped) and then took the card back when I left. There is no indication in my passport that I was in Cuba.
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Old Apr 26, 06, 5:42 am
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Originally Posted by PaulasPain
one can always ask... but they'll stamp the passport nonetheless (always on the same page in fact!).
I take it you're not an American. The previous poster was referring only to U.S. passports. My experience is they do not stamp them and you don't even have to ask. They know our laws.
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Old Apr 27, 06, 1:47 am
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Greg and Tosser: take a careful look at your american passports for a small (~2sq.cm) box with what looks likes a little outline of a building inside. it's most likely on p16. that's the Cuba stamp. other than a few small numbers and it's unique design, there's no other indication that it's Cuba.

it's possible you're among the exceptions, but just humor me for a second and check that.
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Old Apr 27, 06, 9:18 am
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I'm Canadian, so I have a Canadian passport. I'll check (it's not in my current passport), but I don't recall any stamps in my passport. Actually, I was a little disappointed, because it was only the second "international" (non Canada or US) trip that I had taken, and really wanted the stamp.

Greg
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Old May 2, 06, 8:55 am
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I looked through my old passport this weekend and confirmed there was no stamp in my passport from my trip to Cuba. Every stamp was identified by country, and there were no unidentified stamps in the passport.

I was there in 2002. Perhaps the rules have changed since then, and now they stamp?
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Old May 2, 06, 10:31 am
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Originally Posted by PaulasPain
Greg and Tosser: take a careful look at your american passports for a small (~2sq.cm) box with what looks likes a little outline of a building inside. it's most likely on p16. that's the Cuba stamp. other than a few small numbers and it's unique design, there's no other indication that it's Cuba.

it's possible you're among the exceptions, but just humor me for a second and check that.
Bloodclaat! I snuck a visit to Cuba in 2000 and could've sworn they only stamped my special Tourist card. But there on page 16 is a diagram like what you're describing!
And to think I've been traveling all this time on this passport!
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Old Nov 15, 06, 10:13 pm
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Originally Posted by jptasker
Just make the flight up to YYZ (Toronto) which offers direct flights to Cuba. You will find it easier then flying US - Mexico - Cuba. Just my $ 0.02. JP
Actually, you should expect to get the biggest hassle travelling through Canada of just about anywhere. Other bad gateways are anywhere in Mexico, the Bahamas, and Jamaica. You'd be safest flying through Venezuela, as Cuba and Venezuela have very good diplomatic relations, and Venezuela won't sell it's airline passenger manifests to the US. All of the others do.

Be aware that it's fairly easy to find "missing" periods of travel in your passport if customs wants to go searching for them. The fine right now for violation of the travel ban is $10,000 a pop. Since 2004, the Office of Foreign Asset Control has gone after 10x more people for illegal travel than prior to 2004. (5000+ fines levied per year vs. 500 per year prior).

You should think things through carefully...
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