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Does anyone else secretly hope for rough weather?

Does anyone else secretly hope for rough weather?

Old Feb 25, 18, 9:34 am
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Does anyone else secretly hope for rough weather?

I've never been motion sick perhaps in part due to spending my formative years around small boats and often in rough water so I can't relate to those who pop Gravol like they are Skittles and who won't step off the dock without wearing transdermal patches, acupressure wristbands and other magic amulets.

On a South Pacific cruise a few years ago we ran into some rough weather on a sea day. Not scary rough but enough that walking was often a challenge, shows were cancelled, the dining room was half empty and many of the guests looked queasy. I felt fine.

When the weather settled down there was much moaning by some passengers who insisted the captain should have avoided the weather. I was glad he didn't although kept the opinion to myself. A day or two of bad weather on a cruise is a good reminder that we are land-based creatures and just visiting when on the water.

Does anyone else secretly hope the seas get rough on a cruise?

Last edited by Badenoch; May 18, 18 at 7:38 am
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Old Feb 25, 18, 9:39 am
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Originally Posted by Badenoch View Post
I've never been motion sick perhaps in part due to spending my formative years around small boats and often in rough water so I can't relate to those who pop Gravol like they are Skittles and who won't step off the dock without wearing transdermal patches, acupressure wristbands and other magic amulets.

On a South Pacific cruise a few years ago we ran into some rough weather on a sea day. Not scary rough but enough that walking was often a challenge, shows were cancelled, the dining room was half empty and many of the guests looked queasy. I felt fine.

When the weather settled down there was much pissing and moaning by some passengers who insisted the captain should have avoided the weather. I was glad he didn't although kept the opinion to myself. A day or two of bad weather on a cruise is a good reminder that we are land-based creatures and just visiting when on the water.

Does anyone else secretly hope the seas gets rough on a cruise?
Nope. I donít hope for legionnaires disease, terrorist attacks, or E-Coli, either.
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Old Feb 25, 18, 9:46 am
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I spent a month on a small ships in the Southern Ocean, and when the seas got big it was very exciting and a little scary. Scopalamine kept me in good shape, and the power of the ocean is amazing. But, a day or two of 10 meter waves is enough for me!
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Old Feb 25, 18, 10:04 am
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I have been around boats my entire life and I get motion sickness very easily. When I was a kid, I didn't have a choice, so I got sick about once or twice a week. Now that I am an adult, you never see me on a cruise as I avoid them like the norovirus.

I cannot read while a plane is taxiing, or in a car, or watch a movie on a plane during turbulence. I got nauseous on the Star Ferry crossing in Hong Kong.

I think you're lucky it doesn't bother you, and I am glad you enjoy it. In my opinion, Dante could have included a cruise as one of the circles of hell.
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Old Feb 25, 18, 11:22 am
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Nope. Grew up in the Pacific Northwest and lived on Puget Sound. Had my fill of thrilling rides in everything from sailing dingies to 65 foot yachts. Luckily I don’t get sea sick but getting to that age where I don’t want to get bounced around and injuried.
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Old Feb 25, 18, 8:11 pm
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Originally Posted by bitterproffit View Post
​​​​​​...
I cannot read while a plane is taxiing, or in a car, or watch a movie on a plane during turbulence. I got nauseous on the Star Ferry crossing in Hong Kong.
...
Victoria Harbour is not the smoothest for smaller crafts built before the days of stabilizers. You are not the only one who have seasickness issues crossing the Harbour.
Before the cross Harbour tunnels there were Kowloon or Hong Kong Island residents who has never visited the other side
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Old Feb 26, 18, 9:47 am
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Originally Posted by tentseller View Post
Victoria Harbour is not the smoothest for smaller crafts built before the days of stabilizers. You are not the only one who have seasickness issues crossing the Harbour.
Before the cross Harbour tunnels there were Kowloon or Hong Kong Island residents who has never visited the other side
I've been on the Star Ferry a few times and can't relate to being seasick on it. Perhaps part of the reason is genetic. Research into motion sickness suggests Asians are more susceptible

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8825456

The results of the first study showed that Chinese women compared to European-American and African-American women experienced significantly more severe symptoms of motion sickness and greater disturbance of normal gastric myoelectric activity. A second study yielded similar results using American-born children of Asian parents. The results of a third study using Chinese men and women were similar and showed a significant increase in vasopressin during rotation. Possible genetic mechanisms that may account for these results are discussed.
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Old Feb 26, 18, 12:34 pm
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I have no motion sickness in cars or on small boats. I grew up reading in the backseat of a car - no problems. On a 30ft sailboat? No problem. But on a cruise ship, if there are rough seas, I do get a little nauseated. I take meclizine and carry on with my day -making it to dinners when crew are unable etc. So I count myself fortunate. One cruise, I did end up with some bruises as I was rolled out of bed.

But I never wish seasickness or sickness inducing weather on others....
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Old Feb 26, 18, 12:38 pm
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i would rather there not be some kind of accident, especially in middle of ocean

reportedly a transatlantic cruise i was on almost mustered due to a galley fire

later made it funny hearing complaints when stabilizers off on alaska cruise
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Old Feb 27, 18, 6:33 am
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Originally Posted by Hoyaheel View Post
I have no motion sickness in cars or on small boats. I grew up reading in the backseat of a car - no problems. On a 30ft sailboat? No problem. But on a cruise ship, if there are rough seas, I do get a little nauseated. I take meclizine and carry on with my day -making it to dinners when crew are unable etc. So I count myself fortunate. One cruise, I did end up with some bruises as I was rolled out of bed.

But I never wish seasickness or sickness inducing weather on others....
I'm not "wishing" seasickness on others but admittedly it would be a consequence of secretly hoping for rough weather. There is a point however where personal responsibility takes over. Those with a predisposition to motion sickness should take the appropriate precautions or forgo cruising. There is no guarantee of a smooth ride.
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Old Mar 6, 18, 11:05 am
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Originally Posted by Badenoch View Post
Does anyone else secretly hope the seas get rough on a cruise?
Hell no! Why would I want that?

I don't recall ever being seasick on a cruise ship before, but that doesn't mean I'm not affected by those who are. They moan and complain. They throw up and take staff away to go clean up the mess. I may have to smell the vomit. The rocking might throw me into walls and stuff. Can't enjoy my meal cuz stuff keeps sliding around (had that happen).

Who the hell would want rough seas?
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Old Mar 7, 18, 6:13 am
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Originally Posted by codex57 View Post
Hell no! Why would I want that?

I don't recall ever being seasick on a cruise ship before, but that doesn't mean I'm not affected by those who are. They moan and complain. They throw up and take staff away to go clean up the mess. I may have to smell the vomit. The rocking might throw me into walls and stuff. Can't enjoy my meal cuz stuff keeps sliding around (had that happen).

Who the hell would want rough seas?
I like a little rough weather because it breaks up the routine. The moaning and complaining doesn't trouble me. Typically on a cruise someone is moaning and complaining about something. Having trouble walking when the seas are rolling means any unsteadiness cannot be automatically attributed to vodka intake.
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Old Mar 7, 18, 3:35 pm
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You sir, have far more patience than me. I can appreciate the hilarity of seeing passengers swaying, but the moaning and groaning ruin my mood. The complaining and vomiting are just something I'd rather do without on my vacation.
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Old Mar 9, 18, 6:38 am
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I hope for it. Lets me know I'm really at sea. Although I didn't grow up around boats and water, sea-sickness is not a problem.

No, I don't wish the sickness on others, but for me personally ship motion adds to the adventure.

The best I've encountered is 12' waves on a transatlantic. Slept wonderfully. Just learned of it in the next morning captain's report.
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Old Mar 9, 18, 10:13 am
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Originally Posted by Romelle View Post
I hope for it. Lets me know I'm really at sea. Although I didn't grow up around boats and water, sea-sickness is not a problem.

No, I don't wish the sickness on others, but for me personally ship motion adds to the adventure.

The best I've encountered is 12' waves on a transatlantic. Slept wonderfully. Just learned of it in the next morning captain's report.
I don't wish seasickness on others either but at what point do they only have themselves to blame? It is perplexing that people prone to motion sickness will go on cruises knowing the risk of rougher seas is there only to bitterly complain when it happens and their patches, pills, wristbands and magic beads don't prevent them from being sick.
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