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CO111 Diverted to Shannon for a medical emergency [31-Dec-2010]

CO111 Diverted to Shannon for a medical emergency [31-Dec-2010]

 
Old Dec 31, 10, 4:29 pm
  #16  
 
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Originally Posted by ani90 View Post
Presumably there was some form of active medical treatment in progress and the incapacitated FA was flat on the floor up till when the plane landed? Did this mean the doctor and assistant(s) were with the sick FA as the plane landed and not belted up in seats? How did that work with plane landing? I suppose one could place the sick FA on one of the lie-flat BF seats and work around her?
I've worked on patients in the aisle during landing. (On United) In those circumstances you do what you need to do... Plus, your center of gravity is quite low and you're fairly stable.

I, too, hope the FA makes a speedy recovery.
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Old Dec 31, 10, 4:46 pm
  #17  
 
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Originally Posted by ani90 View Post
Presumably there was some form of active medical treatment in progress and the incapacitated FA was flat on the floor up till when the plane landed? Did this mean the doctor and assistant(s) were with the sick FA as the plane landed and not belted up in seats? How did that work with plane landing? I suppose one could place the sick FA on one of the lie-flat BF seats and work around her?
I can't think of a single landing where it would have mattered if someone was on the floor and someone else was working on them. In fact, I think I could be standing up for 50%+ of landings and it wouldn't be a problem.

I hope she recovers.
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Old Dec 31, 10, 7:25 pm
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Originally Posted by lolairplanes View Post
I can't think of a single landing where it would have mattered if someone was on the floor and someone else was working on them. In fact, I think I could be standing up for 50%+ of landings and it wouldn't be a problem
50% is not good odds. One of the principles of emergency care is that the carers must not put themselves at risk as aside from not wanting more casualties, to care for the casualty, the carers must be in good shape. I doubt the airlines would accept liability if someone helping a sick pax or crew hit their head on the galley wall during a rough landing.

I suspect if you were to ask professional medical rescue staff they would not land while unstrapped and actively working on a casualty. The landing itself is so brief that the prudent thing might be for the doctor to strap himself for the landing and then once deceleration is over to unstrap themselves and continue resucitation. The reality is that if a pax still needs active resucitation at time of landing then the chances of a successful outcome are unfortunately remote and is not worth heroism or risk on part of the doctor. Regardless a 60 second break in resucitation will unlikely to have impact. This is aside from the fact that it would be difficult, and unsafe, to conduct most medical procedures with the vibration and deceleration associated with landing. Of course it is true that numerous (non-commercial) aircraft landings have taken place with standing passengers etc but then those risks are calculated and not imposed.
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Old Dec 31, 10, 7:33 pm
  #19  
 
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50%+ is if I was standing up not holding onto anything. If I'm on my knee helping someone laying down on the ground, it would never be a problem during any landing in my memory.
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Old Dec 31, 10, 7:38 pm
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Originally Posted by lolairplanes View Post
If I'm on my knee helping someone laying down on the ground, it would never be a problem during any landing in my memory.
What 'help' though do you have in mind? Have you actually been in this position or are you theorizing? I have been in many planes that landed where I doubt there would be many people who could remain stable on their knees with their hands actively performing another action (other than helping maintain the body's stability).
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Old Dec 31, 10, 7:58 pm
  #21  
 
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Yea we must have different experiences on planes because for me there's usually more force stopping and starting on the LAS train to the D gates or the EWR skytrain.
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Old Jan 1, 11, 8:18 am
  #22  
 
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Originally Posted by tht
We are hearing they got her pulse back once the EMT's on the ground got to her :-)
Hope she recovers OK !
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Old Jan 1, 11, 2:50 pm
  #23  
 
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Unfortunately.. according to Aviation Herald comment (second one down) in the link, seen below, the person involved in this event did not survive...

http://avherald.com/h?article=4357f486&opt=1

tk
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Old Jan 1, 11, 3:49 pm
  #24  
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Originally Posted by ani90 View Post
50% is not good odds. One of the principles of emergency care is that the carers must not put themselves at risk as aside from not wanting more casualties, to care for the casualty, the carers must be in good shape. I doubt the airlines would accept liability if someone helping a sick pax or crew hit their head on the galley wall during a rough landing.
.
I saw a picture of Reagan on Air Force One. It was during take off, not landing. However, he was not wearing a seat belt.
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Old Jan 1, 11, 4:00 pm
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Originally Posted by TWA A380 View Post
I saw a picture of Reagan on Air Force One. It was during take off, not landing. However, he was not wearing a seat belt.
i did not see the picture but I am certain he was not kneeling in the galley performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation - there is a big difference.
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Old Jan 1, 11, 4:51 pm
  #26  
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Originally Posted by AustinWeatherGuy View Post
Unfortunately.. according to Aviation Herald comment (second one down) in the link, seen below, the person involved in this event did not survive...

http://avherald.com/h?article=4357f486&opt=1

tk


My thoughts and prayers are with the family.
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Old Jan 1, 11, 5:13 pm
  #27  
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Originally Posted by Hartmann View Post
My thoughts and prayers are with the family.
+1
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Old Jan 1, 11, 5:14 pm
  #28  
 
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Thoughts and prayers.

I'm guessing the same crew would have had to fly out after refuelling, if so that must have been very tough on them. Thumbs up for their professionalism.
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Old Jan 2, 11, 5:51 am
  #29  
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My thoughts go out to her family as well.

There were no further announcements about her status, only an additional thanks to the Doctor who helped try and save her.

To answer a few other posters from the time when she collapsed and they called for a Doctor to when we got to the gate in Shannon they continued to work on her, including during landing and taxi. Despite calls for a second medical professional there was only one on the plane (that was full in coach and 11/16 or so in BF).

She collapsed right by 2L and that's where they worked on her, with 3 pax sat in row 7 (they were not moved) and neither was she (until they had to move her away from the door to open it).

They had an electronic heart monitor of some sort in the medical kit, and cut her shirt open to use this. The doctor and FA helping gave her CPR the whole time until we landed and got to the gate.

Picked up some of the conversation between an FA and the Doctor that she was on some sort of medication for blood pressure, but had stopped taking it a few days earlier as she was not feeling good, and had not felt good on the flight over.

We asked about her status as we were leaving the plane and were sadly informed she had not made it.

All in all (aside from the green oxygen bottles seemingly not working, they had the pax in row 7 trying to get them working), the response was very organized and the FA's were very calm and professional (including on the onward flight where they still performed a full service).

Another observation the FA's wrote up a full report during the flight and had the passengers in row 7 add their details / sign it as well.

Again my condolences to her family and her colleagues at CO.

tht
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Old Jan 2, 11, 6:37 am
  #30  
 
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Unhappy

Originally Posted by tht View Post
One the the Female FA's ot sick very fast. There was one doctor aboard, took about 30 mins to get back to shannon. Not looking good, very sad. :-(
The FA was my mother. She died at the hospital shortly after arriving. I am in Shannon right now claiming her and taking her home with me. Continental has been very helpful in the process, the flight crews arriving have been outreaching with support.

Last edited by Tbalades; Jan 2, 11 at 6:55 am
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