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New 5-year visa for ethnic Chinese?

New 5-year visa for ethnic Chinese?

Old Jul 5, 18, 11:29 am
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New 5-year visa for ethnic Chinese?

My current Chinese visa is about to expire in a year, and I found out that China has recently announced a new 5-year visa for foreigners of Chinese origin. The benefits over a 10-year L or M visa for U.S. citizens seem to be that there are no restrictions on the reason for a visit and opens the door to a 5-year residency permit as well. However, I can't find any information about how to actually apply for it. Has anyone had any experience with this?

https://www.scmp.com/news/china/soci...ou-qualify-new
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Old Jul 16, 18, 9:13 pm
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Still don't get it. There are restrictions on the 10 year visa for reasons for visiting? Never had any issues?
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Old Jul 16, 18, 10:28 pm
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This isn't a "visa". It's just a longer residence permit that you have to apply for at the local PSB. Typical poor reporting from the media.
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Old Jul 22, 18, 9:51 am
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This weekend, I hung out with two people who have 5 year residence permits. Both of them scored these via "A" work permits.

​​​​​​I'm a high "B" myself. My visa agent offered to get me across the chasm (to "A") for y1000, but I declined because he didn't explain the benefits of A v B.

My current renewal plan is to take the HSK in order to clear 90 points without need for any fudge.
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Old Jul 22, 18, 11:22 pm
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Interesting, based on the description: "According to China’s official definition, a foreigner of Chinese origin refers to a former Chinese citizen who has obtained foreign citizenship, or the offspring of present or former Chinese citizens. "

I'm absolutely ethnic Chinese, but it would seem that I don't qualify. My parents left mainland China in 1949 and have never been PRC citizens. My US birth certificate doesn't indicate I'm of Chinese descent (it says, "Oriental").

I wonder how China would verify?
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Old Jul 23, 18, 1:14 am
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Originally Posted by moondog View Post
This weekend, I hung out with two people who have 5 year residence permits. Both of them scored these via "A" work permits.

​​​​​​I'm a high "B" myself. My visa agent offered to get me across the chasm (to "A") for y1000, but I declined because he didn't explain the benefits of A v B.

My current renewal plan is to take the HSK in order to clear 90 points without need for any fudge.
My agent also offered to upgrade me to A this year. Since the company is paying for it I will see if it works and what if any benefit comes out of it.
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Old Jul 23, 18, 1:19 am
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Originally Posted by OskiBear View Post
Interesting, based on the description: "According to China’s official definition, a foreigner of Chinese origin refers to a former Chinese citizen who has obtained foreign citizenship, or the offspring of present or former Chinese citizens. "

I'm absolutely ethnic Chinese, but it would seem that I don't qualify. My parents left mainland China in 1949 and have never been PRC citizens. My US birth certificate doesn't indicate I'm of Chinese descent (it says, "Oriental").

I wonder how China would verify?
I suppose if you really wanted to push it you would need your full birth certificate plus whatever documentation to prove that your parents had ROC citizenship. All ROC citizens are recognised as PRC citizens, which is why you can't use an ROC passport to enter the PRC.
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Old Jul 23, 18, 2:03 am
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Originally Posted by tauphi View Post
This isn't a "visa". It's just a longer residence permit that you have to apply for at the local PSB. Typical poor reporting from the media.
It is indeed a visa. IIRC - it should be S1.

Originally Posted by OskiBear View Post
Interesting, based on the description: "According to China’s official definition, a foreigner of Chinese origin refers to a former Chinese citizen who has obtained foreign citizenship, or the offspring of present or former Chinese citizens. "

I'm absolutely ethnic Chinese, but it would seem that I don't qualify. My parents left mainland China in 1949 and have never been PRC citizens. My US birth certificate doesn't indicate I'm of Chinese descent (it says, "Oriental").

I wonder how China would verify?
Can they obtain a Taiwanese Passport?
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Old Jul 23, 18, 10:06 am
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Originally Posted by tauphi View Post
I suppose if you really wanted to push it you would need your full birth certificate plus whatever documentation to prove that your parents had ROC citizenship. All ROC citizens are recognised as PRC citizens, which is why you can't use an ROC passport to enter the PRC.
Interesting - I had no idea that was the case. They can easily document prior ROC citizenship prior to coming to the US, so perhaps that'll do the trick.
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Old Jul 23, 18, 6:38 pm
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Originally Posted by OskiBear View Post
Interesting, based on the description: "According to China’s official definition, a foreigner of Chinese origin refers to a former Chinese citizen who has obtained foreign citizenship, or the offspring of present or former Chinese citizens. "

I'm absolutely ethnic Chinese, but it would seem that I don't qualify. My parents left mainland China in 1949 and have never been PRC citizens. My US birth certificate doesn't indicate I'm of Chinese descent (it says, "Oriental").

I wonder how China would verify?
Funny how you never wrote Taiwanese but everybody guessed it anyway.
China accepts everybody as Chinese, so I wouldn't worry too much about it. Unlike Taiwanese ...
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Old Jul 24, 18, 10:09 am
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Originally Posted by s0ssos View Post
Funny how you never wrote Taiwanese but everybody guessed it anyway.
China accepts everybody as Chinese, so I wouldn't worry too much about it. Unlike Taiwanese ...
LOL - indeed. I was surprised people didn't point out the fact the word "oriental" was used to describe race on my birth certificate
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Old Jul 27, 18, 12:25 am
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Originally Posted by garykung View Post
It is indeed a visa. IIRC - it should be S1.
No it's not. An S1 visa (or any long-stay visa for that matter) allows a stay of only 30 days. You must convert it into a residence permit at the local PSB (entry/exit branch) within that period.
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Old Jul 29, 18, 3:14 am
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Originally Posted by tauphi View Post
No it's not. An S1 visa (or any long-stay visa for that matter) allows a stay of only 30 days. You must convert it into a residence permit at the local PSB (entry/exit branch) within that period.
You are mixing 2 things up.

A S1 visa allows stay over 180 days. However, similar to many EU countries, and the U.K., one must register with their local PSB, as a requirement from the hukou (household registration) system.
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Old Jul 29, 18, 10:38 am
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Originally Posted by garykung View Post
You are mixing 2 things up.

A S1 visa allows stay over 180 days. However, similar to many EU countries, and the U.K., one must register with their local PSB, as a requirement from the hukou (household registration) system.
I am in agreement with @tauphi on this. An S1 visa is granted for those visiting (or accompanying as a dependent) and expected to be in China greater than 180 days. But in the first 30 days after arrival on S1 status, the visa is converted to a Residence Permit (length of the RP granted varies depending on the situation and passport country). At that point, the S1 is voided in the system and the RP becomes the legal vehicle by which the foreigner exists in China as well as exits and re-enters. Many people persist in saying they are on S1 status but in the strictest technical sense, that is only the initial entry vehicle to get into China. What does carry over from visa to RP are the terms: in other words, an S1 is for family visits, and you cannot come to China on this and expect to take on employment that you might find while in China. It is safe to assume that the Chinese Immigration/police database does keep track of the initial visa granted (Z1 for employment, X1 for study, S1 for family, Q1 for Chinese family) even if all of these types of longer visas get converted to RP's. And that while on RP, you better be doing the activity that your original visa was granted for.

Registering your place of residence with the local police is a completely different and separate requirement that exists for everybody, regardless of visa (or RP status).

Last edited by jiejie; Jul 29, 18 at 10:44 am
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Old Aug 28, 18, 6:46 pm
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Ethnicity Chinese. Applied at the Consulate in Los Angeles. Showed my old expired visa and passport. No problem with being granted the 10 year multiple visa.
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