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Service dog in training escapes during TSA screening, still missing

Service dog in training escapes during TSA screening, still missing

Old Apr 8, 2017, 4:22 pm
  #1  
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Service dog in training escapes during TSA screening, still missing

Service Dog-in-Training Is Missing After Escaping Orlando Airport During Security Screening

Another story here, as well.

A TSA spokesperson told WESH that the dog’s vest should not have been removed and that the agent will be retrained.
I hope the dog is found unharmed. "Retraining" the employee doesn't help find the dog, and doesn't help the owner. I've seen nothing about TSA helping in the search so far, although maybe someone else has further information.
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Old Apr 8, 2017, 5:50 pm
  #2  
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Not to be heartless, but where is it in the Air Carrier Access Act that service animals in training are allowed to travel in any manner other than as pets? Just wondering; perhaps there's a reason for that.

I too hope the dog is found and both the TSO and the dog re-trained.
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Old Apr 8, 2017, 6:06 pm
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Sure, like retraining that TSA agent will help. What a tool.
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Old Apr 8, 2017, 6:08 pm
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Out of curiosity, how does TSA handle Seeing Eye dogs? Do they make the owner remove the entire harness, leaving just a collar on the dog?

It must have been a really ignorant screener who insisted that the vest and everything had to come off the dog. How did he/she expect to control the animal? Too bad the dog didn't bite the screener before taking off.

Originally Posted by HawaiiTrvlr
Sure, like retraining that TSA agent will help. What a tool.
^^

Last edited by TWA884; Apr 8, 2017 at 7:04 pm Reason: Merge consecutive posts
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Old Apr 8, 2017, 9:05 pm
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The TSA screener should be fired. Any major error of screening procedures should be met with one result, termination.
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Old Apr 8, 2017, 10:17 pm
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Hmmm.

What about the other TSOs, LTSOs and STSOs at the checkpoint? Do they all need retraining, too, or did they watch and keep their mouths shut because it was just another example of a screener exercising his 'discretion'?

Review the checkpoint tapes. Any LTSO or STSO tasked with keeping an eye on what was going on should be both 'retrained' and disciplined for allowing this to happen.
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Old Apr 9, 2017, 8:34 am
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Originally Posted by chollie
Hmmm.

What about the other TSOs, LTSOs and STSOs at the checkpoint? Do they all need retraining, too, or did they watch and keep their mouths shut because it was just another example of a screener exercising his 'discretion'?

Review the checkpoint tapes. Any LTSO or STSO tasked with keeping an eye on what was going on should be both 'retrained' and disciplined for allowing this to happen.
I disagree. If the Supervisors and Managers can't supervise and manage they need to be terminated.
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Old Apr 10, 2017, 10:07 am
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From https://www.tsa.gov/travel/special-procedures

Accessories

Service dog collars, harnesses, leashes, backpacks, vests and other items are subject to screening. Items that are necessary to maintain control of the service dog or indicate that the service dog is on duty do not require removal to be screened.

#####
One of the things I've learned from a woman on YouTube is that dogs recognize having the vest on as being "on duty". If the TSA insisted that the vest be taken off, they're fully responsible for this mess.
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Old Apr 10, 2017, 10:51 am
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Originally Posted by HawaiiTrvlr
Sure, like retraining that TSA agent will help. What a tool.
That's the TSA's response to any employee screw-up they can't cover up or blame the victim. They do lots of retraining, at our expense of course.
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Old Apr 10, 2017, 11:30 am
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Originally Posted by FliesWay2Much
That's the TSA's response to any employee screw-up they can't cover up or blame the victim. They do lots of retraining, at our expense of course.
Retraining isn't necessarily the answer.

Every TSA screener is certified to work a number of positions and are retested at regular intervals to maintain that certification. Assuming this person was not a trainee, did they actually know the procedures and ignored their training? If not was the training lacking which would make the trainer and person testing for competency responsible. The individual, the trainer, the skills tester, and the checkpoint supervisor should all be held accountable. Who signed off on the person conducting the training and who decided that someone was competent to check other workers skills? One or more, if not all, should be fired.

This was a pretty basic failure. I think more than one person would be found at fault if anyone actually took the time to investigate.
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Old Apr 10, 2017, 12:05 pm
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Originally Posted by Boggie Dog
Retraining isn't necessarily the answer.

Every TSA screener is certified to work a number of positions and are retested at regular intervals to maintain that certification. Assuming this person was not a trainee, did they actually know the procedures and ignored their training? If not was the training lacking which would make the trainer and person testing for competency responsible. The individual, the trainer, the skills tester, and the checkpoint supervisor should all be held accountable. Who signed off on the person conducting the training and who decided that someone was competent to check other workers skills? One or more, if not all, should be fired.

This was a pretty basic failure. I think more than one person would be found at fault if anyone actually took the time to investigate.
None of this addresses the issue of 'screener discretion'.

The screener has the final say on how the animal will be screened. This screener used 'screener discretion' to insist on a more comprehensive screening, ie, requiring the animal to completely disrobe. It was clearly in accordance with accepted TSA practices or another TSO or LTSO or STSO witnessing the actions would have said something.

Maybe the poor pooch didn't feel up to the groin rub it saw other pax getting.
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Old Apr 10, 2017, 3:57 pm
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Originally Posted by chollie
Maybe the poor pooch didn't feel up to the groin rub it saw other pax getting.
Damn dog is smarter than most people...
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Old Apr 11, 2017, 8:48 am
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Originally Posted by JoeBas
Damn dog is smarter than most people...
I wonder if they'll fine the dog $11,000 . . .
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Old Apr 11, 2017, 10:54 am
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Originally Posted by Ari
I wonder if they'll fine the dog $11,000 . . .
Perhaps TSA should fine the screener who lost control of the dog $11,000 for interfering with the screening process.
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Old Apr 11, 2017, 12:29 pm
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Perhaps this could have been avoided if the dog's owner had bought him Pre-check.

That said, perhaps the TSO is to be commended for being suspicious. If this pooch didn't have something to hide, he wouldn't have run away. He would have stayed put and allowed the TSO to fondle his 'junk'.
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