Go Back   > > >
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Mar 3, 14, 8:08 am   #1
Original Poster
  
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: CLT
Programs: AA Concierge Key, UA Silver, Hyatt Diamond, Marriott Platinum, SPG Gold
Posts: 1,367
Best Practices on Filming TSA (From an Article on TSA Supervisor Prohibiting This)

FROM: 12-Year TSA Veteran Monroe Caught on Video Prohibiting Legal Filming at Airport Checkpoint; “AskTSA” Stonewalls

Quote:
...Finally, here is ways that you can do your part to help ensure you hold on to your remaining freedoms which have not yet been infringed out while enduring the TSA screening process:

Always be polite and courteous. Just because the TSA gives you ugly stares, threatens you, or gives commands which violate your rights doesn’t mean you should be ugly back. Be professional and courteous. Doing so will make them look all the more vile and evil in the eyes of the public. Readers have reported that when filming their voice gets jittery, their hands unsteady, and they get nervous. This is your body’s natural reaction when facing a threat. Some may choose to not continue to film due to this visceral reaction. Doing so in a peaceful way provides good practice for handling these situations, or for unexpected more grave “fight or flight” situations outside of the airport in the future.

Know the State or City Laws. The vast majority of states and cities do not prohibit your natural right to videotape or be a journalist at an airport. However there are a few exceptions which operate in a Constitutional grey area. This CNN article is a great reference. We have had dozens of reader submissions of filming the TSA checkpoint and not once has a reader been detained by police or not been able to leave the scene and go about his or her business when he or she wished to. With that said, it sadly only takes one bad apple TSA agent or LEO on a power trip make your day difficult.

Film just AFTER you’ve completed the screening process. You have every right to begin filming the TSA at any point in the screening process. The problem is, if you start right off the bat, say at the ID checkpoint, or before going through the metal detector, the TSA can immorally and easily ruin your day. They can say you were a security threat and prevent you from going through the screening process and therefore getting on the plane. The TSA cannot legally detain you in any circumstance, they can call the police who potentially could, and make you miss your flight. Therefore clear the screening process. And as you are finishing repacking your bag then begin to make your films and video. At this point you have successfully passed the screening process and film away. The TSA has no more “power” over you to screen you. We suggested standing in the public hallways where it is crystal clear your camera or the surveillance cameras can see you are not blocking or impeding the screening process. Don’t film the x-ray machines or the private rooms.

Film often. The individual TSA agents to which we have spoken truly dislike it when you film them even though they are being filmed at all times by surveillance cameras. Much of this reason is that people value their privacy, even if they don’t have an expectation of privacy when you take a job that serves or works in public like Police and TSA. Point out the irony to them that they value their privacy just like you value your ability to travel in public without an unconstitutional search and seizure of of your 6 oz contact lens solution. We have many readers now who pull out their camera phone every time they complete a TSA screening just to capture the scene or see what interest interactions happen with agents.

Film as recourse. If an agent was particularly rude to you, maybe barking orders loudly, not showing courtesy or sensitivity to your needs, or giving you a very intrusive enhanced-pat down, pull out your phone and take his or her picture! They will hate it, it is your right, and you may be able to warn other travelers of this agent or help get him noticed by the TSA so they can take corrective action. Don’t forget to submit your pictures and video to: http://tsasecuritytheater.tumblr.com.

Ask Good, Open-Ended Questions. If a TSA agent engages you in a conversation at the checkpoint, ask questions as your responses. For example, if they say “Why are you filming at my checkpoint?”, you could respond with, “To what extent am I allowed to film at a TSA checkpoint, a public place?” or “why do you ask, do you have something to hide?”. Or if you wish to turn their own game back at them, you could say, “I am filming because there have been some safety and security threats at the airport. Your safety is my priority. To what extent are you concerned about these threats?” Once seasoned or confident, you could continue (although no longer open-ended, the effect and irony will be there in the response), “Since there have been reports in the area of thefts of passenger belongings, for your safety and security I’d like to screen you by giving you a pat-down. Do you consent?”
beofotch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 4, 14, 3:42 am   #2
  
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: LAS
Programs: DL-DM/MM/Krypto, Marriott PLT, SPG100, SWA CP, GE/Pre✓, former UA1k
Posts: 1,270
So filming is "within my rights" and perfectly legal, but I have to beg, plead, act appropriately, and then hope I'm not harassed and retaliated against. But, I should do it only after clearing security to lessen the chance I'm harassed and retaliated against

Super
ScatterX is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 4, 14, 3:47 am   #3
  
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: LAS
Programs: DL-DM/MM/Krypto, Marriott PLT, SPG100, SWA CP, GE/Pre✓, former UA1k
Posts: 1,270
Quote:
Originally Posted by beofotch View Post
FROM: 12-Year TSA Veteran Monroe Caught on Video Prohibiting Legal Filming at Airport Checkpoint; “AskTSA” Stonewalls
Quote:
Ask Good, Open-Ended Questions. If a TSA agent engages you in a conversation at the checkpoint, ask questions as your responses. For example, if they say “Why are you filming at my checkpoint?”, you could respond with, “To what extent am I allowed to film at a TSA checkpoint, a public place?” or “why do you ask, do you have something to hide?”. Or if you wish to turn their own game back at them, you could say, “I am filming because there have been some safety and security threats at the airport. Your safety is my priority. To what extent are you concerned about these threats?” Once seasoned or confident, you could continue (although no longer open-ended, the effect and irony will be there in the response), “Since there have been reports in the area of thefts of passenger belongings, for your safety and security I’d like to screen you by giving you a pat-down. Do you consent?”
How incredibly stupid. It adds no value but is certainly going to piss off a clerk that will do just about anything to ruin your day, likely with the "interfering with security, because I said so" excuse.
ScatterX is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 4, 14, 7:00 am   #4
Moderator: Coupon Connection & S.P.A.M
  
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Louisville, KY
Programs: Wild Wild Life, TSA Disparager Diamond (LTDD)
Posts: 56,490
Quote:
Originally Posted by ScatterX View Post
So filming is "within my rights" and perfectly legal, but I have to beg, plead, act appropriately, and then hope I'm not harassed and retaliated against. But, I should do it only after clearing security to lessen the chance I'm harassed and retaliated against

Super
If you have time, have a confederate whose completed the process film you as you're going through the process.

As long as you're not someplace that requires 2 party consent, covertly film before the WTMD and have the confederate take over after you've passed it and are being sexually assaulted or just waiting for your items.

One handy reference

You may record, film, broadcast or amplify any conversation if all parties to the conversation consent. It is always legal to record or film a face-to-face interview when your recorder or camera is in plain view. In these instances, the consent of all parties is presumed.

Of the 50 states, 38, as well as the District of Columbia, allow you to record a conversation to which you are a party without informing the other parties you are doing so. Federal wiretap statutes also permit this so-called one-party-consent recording of telephone conversations in most circumstances.1 Twelve states forbid the recording of private conversations without the consent of all parties. Those states are California, Connecticut, Florida, Illinois, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Montana, Nevada, New Hampshire, Pennsylvania and Washington.2
Spiff is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 4, 14, 7:19 am   #5
  
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Houston
Posts: 8,946
"We have had dozens of reader submissions of filming the TSA checkpoint and not once has a reader been detained by police or not been able to leave the scene and go about his or her business when he or she wished to."

I guess I am just the special one.
ND Sol is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 4, 14, 1:34 pm   #6
FlyerTalk Evangelist
  
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Finally back in Boston after escaping from New York
Posts: 13,254
Quote:
Originally Posted by ND Sol View Post
"We have had dozens of reader submissions of filming the TSA checkpoint and not once has a reader been detained by police or not been able to leave the scene and go about his or her business when he or she wished to."

I guess I am just the special one.
I just reread that thread. Scarier than any terrorist threat.

Mike
mikeef is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Bookmarks

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off

Forum Jump
Contact Us - FlyerTalk - Archive - Top