TSA dog bites woman in ATL

Old May 10, 13, 4:52 pm
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TSA dog bites woman in ATL

ajc.com in Atlanta is reporting an explosives sniffing dog bit a woman waiting at baggage claim on May 2. The dog was walking by and apparently bit her on the stomach. WSB TV also has a piece, but said the bite was too graphic to show.
Wonder how they'll spin this one. Early retirement for the dog?
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Old May 10, 13, 4:57 pm
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The dog probably went through the same rigorous week-long training that the rest of the TSA employees do. What could go wrong?

Maybe they forgot to do one of their famous background checks which magically render a TSA employee harmless at the checkpoint and a non-biter?

I hope she sues them for say... 8.5 billion.
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Old May 10, 13, 4:58 pm
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Originally Posted by Georgia Peach View Post
ajc.com in Atlanta is reporting an explosives sniffing dog bit a woman waiting at baggage claim on May 2. The dog was walking by and apparently bit her on the stomach. WSB TV also has a piece, but said the bite was too graphic to show.
Wonder how they'll spin this one. Early retirement for the dog?
Retraining.
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Old May 10, 13, 5:37 pm
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Originally Posted by Georgia Peach View Post
ajc.com in Atlanta is reporting an explosives sniffing dog bit a woman waiting at baggage claim on May 2. The dog was walking by and apparently bit her on the stomach. WSB TV also has a piece, but said the bite was too graphic to show.
Wonder how they'll spin this one. Early retirement for the dog?
Dog will likely be put down.

Payday for the lady.
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Old May 10, 13, 6:23 pm
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AJC: Explosives-sniffing dog bites woman at airport

Here's the article:

Atlanta Journal Constitution:
Explosives-sniffing dog bites woman at airport

Posted: 5:09 p.m. Friday, May 10, 2013

A short quote:
A Rome woman said Friday an explosives-detection dog working the baggage claim area at Atlanta Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport bit her, unprovoked.

Susan Dubitsky said she and her husband were waiting for her sister to arrive around 4:15 p.m. May 2. As an Atlanta police officer and the dog walked past, the dog bit her on the stomach. A little later, when the officer came back to check on her, Dubitsky said, “the dog tried to come at me another time.
and
While the dog was working with APD, it is owned by the Transportation Security Administration.
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Old May 10, 13, 7:04 pm
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This is a really weird story.

Properly trained sniffer dogs get happy and excited when they detect their target scent; they don't get aggressive, angry, or hostile.

Likewise, a properly trained handler never allows his animal to have more than a few feet of lead in a crowded area, and can usually pull the animal back if it gets aggressive.

It's rare for any animal to attack someone completely unprovoked, but almost unheard of for a well-trained sniffer dog to do so.

My suspicion is that the woman who was bitten somehow provoked the animal, either with her behavior, or perhaps by scent, without being aware of it. But either way, I think the handler also has to be held to account, because he wasn't able to read his animal's emotional state well enough to anticipate and head off the attack.

No matter what actually happened, I seriously doubt that the animal was at fault.
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Old May 10, 13, 7:20 pm
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Originally Posted by WillCAD View Post

No matter what actually happened, I seriously doubt that the animal was at fault.
But the trainer/owner very likely is. And should be punished/disbanded accordingly.
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Old May 10, 13, 7:24 pm
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Problem "trained" by TSA.
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Old May 10, 13, 11:49 pm
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Looking for explosives at baggage claim? Wouldn't it be a little late?
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Old May 11, 13, 2:29 am
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Originally Posted by WillCAD View Post
No matter what actually happened, I seriously doubt that the animal was at fault.
Dog bit her? Dog is at fault. End of story.

The cause may be improper training or handling, but the result was an improper bite.

I remember having a heated discussion on this board a couple of years ago with someone who insisted that a properly trained dog will never bite. I pointed out that they are animals and, just like humans, you can never predict with 100% certainty what they will or will not do.

This just proves my point.
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Old May 11, 13, 5:52 am
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Originally Posted by DeltaFan17 View Post
Looking for explosives at baggage claim? Wouldn't it be a little late?
If your goal is to find the extremely rare to nonexistent case of someone trying to put a bomb on the plane in their luggage, yes.

If your goal is to find the extremely rare to nonexistent case of someone trying to put a bomb in the crowded area of the airport to create the maximum number of casualties and injuries, then maybe not too late, but likely a total waste of time. But, when does that matter?

If your goal is to find someone with drugs in their suitcase, then no, it is not too late or a waste of time, at least to local law enforcement. The libertarian in me says to leave people the heck alone, but that is not the way many LEO's think.
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Old May 11, 13, 6:10 am
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Originally Posted by DeltaFan17 View Post
Looking for explosives at baggage claim? Wouldn't it be a little late?
NO

Think about it. If there were really a threat of terrorism against aviation, baggage claim or the TSA checkpoint would be where it would come. Anybody that wanted to could drop a bag filled with explosives onto the carousel, or an organized attack on the checkpoint could have a couple of people come in with AK's and spray the TSA checkpoint.

Or, someone could prepare a real liquid explosive that would go off when the clerk confiscated it and threw it in the trash at the checkpoint.
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Old May 11, 13, 6:17 am
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Originally Posted by InkUnderNails View Post
If your goal is to find someone with drugs in their suitcase, then no, it is not too late or a waste of time, at least to local law enforcement. The libertarian in me says to leave people the heck alone, but that is not the way many LEO's think.
That's not the goal, I think; the goal is to parade around with dogs and pretend the clerks are doing something. With that as the goal, having a passenger bitten is even more inexcusable than it would be if the use of dogs had some point. If it was CPB or something, there would be some point to the use of dogs, and the deficiency would be poor control of the dog. In this case, neither the dog nor the clerk should be there at all.
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Old May 11, 13, 9:14 am
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Originally Posted by Always Flyin View Post
Dog bit her? Dog is at fault. End of story.

The cause may be improper training or handling, but the result was an improper bite.

I remember having a heated discussion on this board a couple of years ago with someone who insisted that a properly trained dog will never bite. I pointed out that they are animals and, just like humans, you can never predict with 100% certainty what they will or will not do.

This just proves my point.
HOGWASH.

A dog is not a sentient being; it doesn't make decisions based on rational thought, or emotional response. A dog acts on only two things - instinct, and training.

Blaming a dog which bites someone is rather akin to blaming a ladder that someone falls off when they climb it in unsafe conditions. Sure, the ladder was unsteady - but only because the idiot human put the ladder onto uneven ground before climbing it. But suppose the ladder is broken; it's still not the ladder's fault, because the idiot human climbed up a broken ladder. How could the idiot human have known the ladder was broken? He should have checked it before he entrusted his life and safety to it; if he didn't, he's an idiot, and his fall was all on him.

Here's a more direct example: Wonderful dog, family pet, loves all humans and other dogs and cats, never bitten, growled, snarled, or snapped at anyone or anything in its life. If I poke that dog in the eye with a sharp stick and it bites me, is that dog at fault? Is it a dangerously unpredictable creature which must be put down to protect humans?

HECK. NO. It's a living thing which defended itself instinctively when pain was inflicted on it.

When a trained and certified sniffer dog bites a human, either the handler or the bitten person are at fault. There is no possibility of the dog going berserk if the handler handles the animal properly, i.e. restrains it, and there is no possibility of the dog biting someone absent some sort of provocation.

This doesn't necessarily mean that the woman who was bitten was intentionally abusing the dog or doing anything out of the ordinary; she may have unknowingly done something, or wore a scent, that triggered the dog's aggressive response.

Dogs ARE predictable, but they're enormously complex. If you know dog psychology well enough, AND you know the complete life history of the dog, you can accurately predict how the dog will react to almost any stimulus. However, the less you know about a given animal, and the less dog psychology you know, the less you can predict the dog's response.

In short, just because you or I can't predict the actions of a dog doesn't mean the dog's actions are unpredictable. And in this case, the handler is most at fault, IMHO, because he didn't properly restrain his animal in a public place full of people. Something triggered an aggressive response from the animal - we don't yet know what - and the handler failed to properly restrain the animal.

Hopefully, further details will come to light and explain what triggered the aggressive response from the animal; it was some sort of sensual stimulus, most likely a scent, a sound, or a visual queue from the person who was bitten. Given that the animal reacted aggressively twice, under different sets of circumstances, I think it's unlikely that it was a visual queue (i.e. a particular behavior) from the woman. I think it was most likely a scent of some kind on the woman, perhaps one she didn't even know she had on her.
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Old May 11, 13, 11:52 am
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Yeah, uh huh.

And pit bulls are gregarious, child friendly dogs that every family should have as a pet . . .

Dog bites someone standing there minding their own business? That dog has a problem.
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