Go Back  FlyerTalk Forums > Travel&Dining > Travel Safety/Security > Checkpoints and Borders Policy Debate
Reload this Page >

Email reply from TSA on my inquiry about having passengers speak their names

Email reply from TSA on my inquiry about having passengers speak their names

Old Jul 18, 11, 3:35 pm
  #1  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 322
Email reply from TSA on my inquiry about having passengers speak their names

I wrote to the TSA via their website on Sunday asking for specific rules on what they were allowed to ask of me when I show them my ID at the checkpoint. I asked for what was the official policy on asking passengers to speak their names and could they either respond with a copy of whatever the new policy was or where I could find it on the TSA website. I sent one message using my email browser to the address [email protected] and also used one of their popup message senders at their website.

So, today I received 2 answers which basically tell me nothing!

***************************
Thank you for your e-mail message. We appreciate that you took the time to share this information with us.

So that we may forward your e-mail to the appropriate office for action, please provide us with the following specific details:

Specific name of the airport where the incident occurred
Date and time of incident
Airline
Contact number if one is available.

You can also provide us with this information by calling the TSA Contact Center, toll-free at (866) 289-9673. If you are outside the United States and cannot use the toll-free number, please call us at (571) 227-2900.

*******************************
Thank you for your email message.



The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) does not discuss or release specific security procedures.

This information is developed exclusively for TSA personnel and is considered Sensitive Security Information (SSI). TSA cannot release SSI to the public because it is considered detrimental to the security of transportation.

We hope this information is useful.

TSA Contact Center


Chrisinhouston is offline  
Old Jul 18, 11, 3:48 pm
  #2  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 322
Just got off of the phone with the TSA call center and the lady was quite nice and spent about 10 minutes researching this and said she can find nothing regarding TSO ID checkers asking names or the policy on that. She said she would forward this to the IAH TSA management team to research it and get back to me. Yea, right...
Chrisinhouston is offline  
Old Jul 18, 11, 3:54 pm
  #3  
nrr
2020 FlyerTalk Awards
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Programs: AA Executive Platinum; 2MM AA, Delta Diamond, Hilton Diamond
Posts: 8,700
Originally Posted by Chrisinhouston View Post
Just got off of the phone with the TSA call center and the lady was quite nice and spent about 10 minutes researching this and said she can find nothing regarding TSO ID checkers asking names or the policy on that. She said she would forward this to the IAH TSA management team to research it and get back to me. Yea, right...
They'll send you another copy of the first letter you received.
nrr is offline  
Old Jul 18, 11, 3:58 pm
  #4  
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Houston
Posts: 8,945
I questioned the name pronunciation requirement at IAH via the TSA Blog "Talk to TSA" on Saturday. I stated in my request that I was flying out of IAH later this week, so I would like to know the status before then.
ND Sol is offline  
Old Jul 18, 11, 4:01 pm
  #5  
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: DFW
Programs: AS, BA, AA
Posts: 3,670
You could just print out and hand them this card:
www.howtovanish.com/images/Silent.pdf

After all, if TSA suspects you are a terrorist, your best bet is to invoke the 5th Amendment.

I bet that would get you a retaliatory SSSS.
janetdoe is offline  
Old Jul 18, 11, 6:19 pm
  #6  
Ari
FlyerTalk Evangelist
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Chicago
Posts: 11,010
Originally Posted by janetdoe View Post
You could just print out and hand them this card:
www.howtovanish.com/images/Silent.pdf
That card is silly for a variety of reasons.
Ari is offline  
Old Jul 18, 11, 7:01 pm
  #7  
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 1,145
Originally Posted by ND Sol View Post
I questioned the name pronunciation requirement at IAH via the TSA Blog "Talk to TSA" on Saturday. I stated in my request that I was flying out of IAH later this week, so I would like to know the status before then.
Hand them a card that says:

"I don't discuss or release my name in an oral form.

Using my name orally is considered Sensitive Security Information (SSI) and I cannot release SSI to you because it is detrimental to my security.

I hope this information is useful."
TheGolfWidow is offline  
Old Jul 18, 11, 10:39 pm
  #8  
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 542
Originally Posted by TheGolfWidow View Post
Hand them a card that says:

"I don't discuss or release my name in an oral form.

Using my name orally is considered Sensitive Security Information (SSI) and I cannot release SSI to you because it is detrimental to my security.

I hope this information is useful."
WINNER!
jco613 is offline  
Old Jul 19, 11, 2:01 pm
  #9  
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Houston
Posts: 8,945
I just received a response to my inquiry. As you can see below, this appears to be a pilot program and IAH is one of the "lucky" airports:

In response to your recent concern regarding TSA Ticket Document Checkers (TDC) at IAH asking passengers to state their names, you may have heard about the recent incident at another airport of an individual who inappropriately gained access through the TSA TDC. You may also have heard on the news about changes TSA is planning to implement as it moves to a more risk based security. At airports around the country, you will encounter different methods being employed at different positions as part of pilot programs and assessment opportunities. Pilot programs and their assessment are opportunities to review changes in the security screening process and their impact prior to implementing at airports around the country, or in some cases identifying that certain processes have no substantial value.

We recognize that this can be frustrating when your experience at one airport is apparently different than at another, however, pilot programs are instrumental to field testing and assessing results before making them a standard operating procedure. These assessments help to provide data to determine whether other processes can be modified or avoided in the future. We appreciate your patience in assisting us to work toward improving the process you have become accustomed to.

If I can offer further information or clarification, please do not hesitate to contact me.
ND Sol is offline  
Old Jul 19, 11, 2:06 pm
  #10  
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Happily living in Frenaros Cyprus having escaped the near-death experience called Sofia Bulgaria
Programs: Etihad Guest Gold, DL FO and 1MM, and a bunch of others at a low level
Posts: 1,990
So now the response to a request to pronounce your name is "I decline to participate in your pilot program".
STBCypriot is offline  
Old Jul 19, 11, 2:11 pm
  #11  
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 642
Originally Posted by STBCypriot View Post
So now the response to a request to pronounce your name is "I decline to participate in your pilot program".
Yes, you can state that that is your comment on their skipping the public comment period.
jtodd is offline  
Old Jul 19, 11, 2:12 pm
  #12  
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: ATL Lost Luggage
Programs: Kettle with Kryptonium Medallion Tags
Posts: 5,403
Originally Posted by STBCypriot View Post
So now the response to a request to pronounce your name is "I decline to participate in your pilot program".
No, that will not work - when you say "I decline to participate", TSA will take that to mean that you are declining to be screened.
RatherBeOnATrain is offline  
Old Jul 19, 11, 2:13 pm
  #13  
FlyerTalk Evangelist
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: where the chile is hot
Programs: AA,RR,NW,Delta ,UA,CO
Posts: 32,720
Originally Posted by ND Sol View Post
I just received a response to my inquiry. As you can see below, this appears to be a pilot program and IAH is one of the "lucky" airports:
+1 to someone who bothered to give what appears to be an honest answer.

This specific pilot program is obviously an after-the-fact attempt by TSA to find a way to keep TDC's alert. We've all seen/heard about TDCs who cleared the wrong boarding pass or were talking to a co-worker and not paying close attention to what they were doing. Then there's the recent incident with Noibi (?) and his multiple boarding passes - he clearly got past more than one TDC.

So I suppose they are trying to find a way to keep the TDC's alert and to make sure that everything gets checked. In the past, it seems like some TDCs were required to color mark everything that had been checked, but that becomes pretty routine after a while too.
chollie is offline  
Old Jul 19, 11, 2:13 pm
  #14  
FlyerTalk Evangelist
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: An NPR mind living in a Fox News world
Posts: 13,390
In response to your recent concern regarding TSA Ticket Document Checkers (TDC) at IAH asking passengers to state their names, you may have heard about the recent incident at another airport of an individual who inappropriately gained access through the TSA TDC. You may also have heard on the news about changes TSA is planning to implement as it moves to a more risk based security. At airports around the country, you will encounter different methods being employed at different positions as part of pilot programs and assessment opportunities. Pilot programs and their assessment are opportunities to review changes in the security screening process and their impact prior to implementing at airports around the country, or in some cases identifying that certain processes have no substantial value.

We recognize that this can be frustrating when your experience at one airport is apparently different than at another, however, pilot programs are instrumental to field testing and assessing results before making them a standard operating procedure. These assessments help to provide data to determine whether other processes can be modified or avoided in the future. We appreciate your patience in assisting us to work toward improving the process you have become accustomed to.

If I can offer further information or clarification, please do not hesitate to contact me.
What a crock. So, the TSA's idea of "transparency" is for us to rely on the news? I think anyone of us could identify "certain processes have no substantial value." This name-pronouncing idea is completely useless and in completely unenforceable. Of course, "substantial value" to the TSA is measured in dollars added to their budget and clerks added to the work force.
FliesWay2Much is offline  
Old Jul 19, 11, 2:22 pm
  #15  
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Boston
Posts: 821
... you may have heard about the recent incident at another airport of an individual who inappropriately gained access through the TSA TDC.
Yet the TSA repeatedly told us that this incident represented no threat to safety, because the passenger had been screened. So if it presented no threat, then why add yet another meaningless layer?
saulblum is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Search Engine: