Discuss your meal options here

Reply

Old Nov 24, 18, 5:30 am
  #346  
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 577
Originally Posted by Sophoclefr View Post
Has Krug disappeared???
CX865 YVR-HKG October 2018
It apparently was on the menu, see this post. https://www.flyertalk.com/forum/30322856-post51.html
It would be nice to know what whiskeys will be loaded on ZRH-HKG on the 5th December, Ill report later :-)
Croupier is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Nov 24, 18, 9:25 pm
  #347  
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 860
Originally Posted by Croupier View Post
CX865 YVR-HKG October 2018
It apparently was on the menu, see this post. https://www.flyertalk.com/forum/30322856-post51.html
It would be nice to know what whiskeys will be loaded on ZRH-HKG on the 5th December, Ill report later :-)
On my most recent CX 888 to JFK last week, Krug was not offered during the YVR leg. Not sure if it would have been on the direct HKG --> JFK flights though.
Visconti is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Dec 6, 18, 12:33 am
  #348  
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 549
How do they get away with calling parmesan cheese "vegetarian"?
DragonSoul is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Dec 6, 18, 2:53 am
  #349  
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: SEA
Programs: DL FO, Hilton/SPG/Marriott Gold, Accor Silver
Posts: 1,869
Originally Posted by DragonSoul View Post
How do they get away with calling parmesan cheese "vegetarian"?
I don't know where you're based, but in the US, "vegetarian" only means meat-free. Vegan is the commonly-accepted term for totally animal-product-free food.
jinglish is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Dec 6, 18, 3:19 am
  #350  
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 549
Originally Posted by jinglish View Post
I don't know where you're based, but in the US, "vegetarian" only means meat-free. Vegan is the commonly-accepted term for totally animal-product-free food.
So in the US, the "vegetarian" diet will include chicken, duck, fish, shellfish, animal by-products (such as gelatine, rennet) et al? That does explain why I've met Americans who call themselves vegetarian but they eat, say, chicken. But I would have thought CX would know that the typical vegetarian elsewhere in the world don't eat animal by-products for which the animal would have been killed.
DragonSoul is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Dec 6, 18, 3:36 am
  #351  
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: MNL
Programs: CX MPO DM, Fairmont Platinum, Le Club Accor Platinum,
Posts: 1,929
I'd guess they have parmesan-style cheese that is free from animal by-product. Only Parmigiano-Reggiano would have to follow the use of rennets in the cheese making processes. Again I do not know this for a fact but there are ew animal-rennet-free Parmesan options in the market.
FlyPointyEnd is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Dec 6, 18, 8:40 am
  #352  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: NYLON - AA EXP 1MM, SPG Gold
Posts: 1,175
Could anyone be so kind as to post a current menu for the 840 / 846 flights to JFK? Ideally in F but would also be interested to see J.

Thank you
1/4MM@20 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Dec 6, 18, 4:43 pm
  #353  
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: SEA
Programs: DL FO, Hilton/SPG/Marriott Gold, Accor Silver
Posts: 1,869
Originally Posted by DragonSoul View Post
So in the US, the "vegetarian" diet will include chicken, duck, fish, shellfish, animal by-products (such as gelatine, rennet) et al? That does explain why I've met Americans who call themselves vegetarian but they eat, say, chicken. But I would have thought CX would know that the typical vegetarian elsewhere in the world don't eat animal by-products for which the animal would have been killed.
I don't know a single person who doesn't include chicken, duck, etc. under the definition of "meat." Here's how the terms are laid out here:
  • Vegan: eats no animal products at all.
  • Vegetarian: eats no animal flesh or byproducts of such. Will usually still consume milk, eggs, etc.
  • Pescetarian: eats seafood but no birds, mammals, etc.
VaBeachGirl and clubeurope like this.
jinglish is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Dec 12, 18, 8:34 pm
  #354  
FlyerTalk Evangelist
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: BOS/UTH
Programs: AA LT PLT & 4.28 MM, QR PLT, SPG LT PLT
Posts: 11,361
I really object (and always have) to things like:
Krug 2004 ... Ideal as an aperitif and may also accompany a variety of fish dishes.
I find things like that a bit condescending and generally obnoxious. I don't need anyone to tell me what to drink with what foods. People should drink whatever they like with whatever foods they want, convention be damned. When the opportunity presents, I'll usually drink Champagne with a meal regardless of what the foods are. I like it. CX should stick with a description of the wine, not tell me when to drink it.
Visconti and royng like this.
Dr. HFH is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Dec 13, 18, 6:19 am
  #355  
FlyerTalk Evangelist
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Hong Kong
Programs: None any more
Posts: 10,552
Well yes, but I suspect that many of the people flying in CX F aren't as experienced with wine as you, and would welcome some guidance. I'm with you that good champagne can pair with many things, but some people (once in a lifetime AS mile burners, noveau riche mainlanders, etc) need help.

Also looking at the wine list you commented on, I find it absurd that CX has two wines in F that retail above US$120 (the Krug and the Montrose) and then a bunch of other crap that retails at US$15-20 (and which CX is presumably getting for around US$10). I really don't think that's a good splitting of whatever budget they have. US$10 wines should be in Y, not even J, never mind F.
QRC3288 likes this.
christep is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Dec 13, 18, 4:07 pm
  #356  
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 860
Originally Posted by christep View Post
Well yes, but I suspect that many of the people flying in CX F aren't as experienced with wine as you, and would welcome some guidance. I'm with you that good champagne can pair with many things, but some people (once in a lifetime AS mile burners, noveau riche mainlanders, etc) need help.
While generally, I agree that some guidance is likely conducive for the uninitiated, an F cabin isn't the time or place, in my view. The basics, pairings in this case are primarily based on the western palate, are helpful in that one can't make his own choice to break the "rules," until he first knows the rules. I'd imagine, for most of us, this happens in private during an earlier time in our lives, not in a public place, such as an F cabin on a plane or restaurant.

Personally, I find unsolicited suggestions in fine dining or F cabin in this case to be a tad presumptuous. It reminds of a well-meaning server in a restaurant who suggested I have a Sauternes with my foie gras (the classic pairing), which I've had many times before; but, I prefer it with a sweeter champagne (sparkling wine), and felt neither the need nor inclination to explain this to her. When I read the menu quoted by Dr. H, it reminded me of this incident.

In F, an Airline should just stick to their craft and mind their own business, only offering suggestions if and when a passenger solicits it, in my view.
Visconti is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Dec 13, 18, 7:13 pm
  #357  
FlyerTalk Evangelist
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: BOS/UTH
Programs: AA LT PLT & 4.28 MM, QR PLT, SPG LT PLT
Posts: 11,361
Originally Posted by christep View Post
Well yes, but I suspect that many of the people flying in CX F aren't as experienced with wine as you, and would welcome some guidance. I'm with you that good champagne can pair with many things, but some people (once in a lifetime AS mile burners, noveau riche mainlanders, etc) need help.
Yes, exactly my point, particularly in the F cabin, where you can try several wines before you decide. It's not up to CX to tell (or suggest to) me what to drink with what. People should experiment and find what they like best.


Originally Posted by christep View Post
Also looking at the wine list you commented on, I find it absurd that CX has two wines in F that retail above US$120 (the Krug and the Montrose) and then a bunch of other crap that retails at US$15-20 (and which CX is presumably getting for around US$10). I really don't think that's a good splitting of whatever budget they have. US$10 wines should be in Y, not even J, never mind F.
It may not have been a particularly efficient approach for CX; and I agree that it might have made more sense to spend less on the Montrose and spread the allocated funds around Bordeaux a bit more. That said, I'll happily take the Montrose, thank you.

N.B.: My opinions on this stuff are generally unconventional. I looove the Chateau Talbot (and have since the very first time I tasted it, decades ago), which is only classified as a Quatrièmes Crus.
Dr. HFH is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Jan 2, 19, 2:55 am
  #358  
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: AKL
Programs: NZ*G
Posts: 244
Originally Posted by Croupier View Post
CX865 YVR-HKG October 2018
It apparently was on the menu, see this post. https://www.flyertalk.com/forum/30322856-post51.html
It would be nice to know what whiskeys will be loaded on ZRH-HKG on the 5th December, Ill report later :-)
Interested in your report
ps107 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Jan 6, 19, 9:31 am
  #359  
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: JFK
Programs: CX Silver | UA Silver | Marriott Platinum | Hyatt Globalist | A-Club Silver | AA EXP
Posts: 739
Anyone had chocolate cake on board a CX flight (long-haul J class) recently? I was on CX841 (JFK-HKG) a couple of days ago and size of the cake was about the same as the opera at the F Wing (i.e. a small square). Was that a fluke (maybe they forgot to load enough cakes and decided to cut it?) or is this the new CX?

It's been about 3 years since I last flew CX long-haul so I don't have anything recent to compare with but I don't recall CX cakes on board ever being so small (yes, I like my dessert ...). I know CX is trying to save money left and right (and those cheap tickets ex-VN don't help) but still ....
Rivarix is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Jan 6, 19, 9:59 am
  #360  
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: ORD + HKG
Programs: CX Diamond, AA ExPlat, BAEC Gold, HH Diamond, Hyatt Explorist, Starriott Gold, GE
Posts: 2,586
Originally Posted by Rivarix View Post
Anyone had chocolate cake on board a CX flight (long-haul J class) recently? I was on CX841 (JFK-HKG) a couple of days ago and size of the cake was about the same as the opera at the F Wing (i.e. a small square). Was that a fluke (maybe they forgot to load enough cakes and decided to cut it?) or is this the new CX?

It's been about 3 years since I last flew CX long-haul so I don't have anything recent to compare with but I don't recall CX cakes on board ever being so small (yes, I like my dessert ...). I know CX is trying to save money left and right (and those cheap tickets ex-VN don't help) but still ....
They have switched from a full size (and cut + garnished at the spot - it was often good stuff!) cake/caking ceremony to presenting you a choice of two smaller sized, pre plated desserts for long haul JCL (old) service. Some time ago that roughly matches your figure of 3 years.
G-CIVC is offline  
Reply With Quote

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
  • Ask a Question
    Get answers from community experts
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: