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Can you successfully contest a speeding ticket in Quebec?

Can you successfully contest a speeding ticket in Quebec?

Old Sep 1, 19, 7:40 pm
  #16  
 
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It is a pain driving in Quebec. It is too slow at 100 km. You are doing at least 110 either in Ontario or NB and then suddenly it is Quebec and slow down to 100.km. Yes in reality everyone is doing about 10 over 110 so around 120 and then suddenly you are 20 over instead of 10 over. The Police are more active too in Quebec.
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Old Sep 1, 19, 10:48 pm
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The OP got a ticket for 133 then agreed with the prosecutor to reduce a 160 kmh ticket to 120. Sounds fishy. Suddenly 60 over Vs 33. 60 over they can take your car on the spot. Anyway French or English there should be many bilingual ticket agencies who will fight it usually no fee if they lose.

Also don't drive 133 oops 160 in a 100 zone and you're safe.
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Old Sep 2, 19, 12:37 pm
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Originally Posted by dav662 View Post
It is a pain driving in Quebec. It is too slow at 100 km. You are doing at least 110 either in Ontario or NB and then suddenly it is Quebec and slow down to 100.km. Yes in reality everyone is doing about 10 over 110 so around 120 and then suddenly you are 20 over instead of 10 over. The Police are more active too in Quebec.
Both Ontario and Québec have posted limits of 100 km/h. What are you going on about?
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Old Sep 2, 19, 1:12 pm
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Originally Posted by ls17031 View Post
Both Ontario and Québec have posted limits of 100 km/h. What are you going on about?
I guess I have been driving over the speed limits in Ontario then whenever I am driving there.
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Old Sep 2, 19, 7:22 pm
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Originally Posted by ls17031 View Post
Both Ontario and Québec have posted limits of 100 km/h. What are you going on about?
Originally Posted by dav662 View Post
I guess I have been driving over the speed limits in Ontario then whenever I am driving there.
Raising to the max speed to 110 soon.
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Old Sep 2, 19, 7:56 pm
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Originally Posted by OSSYULYYZ View Post
Raising to the max speed to 110 soon.
Only on 3 sections of highway initially. Most of the 400 series highways will remain at 100
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Old Sep 7, 19, 4:09 am
  #22  
 
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In Quebec, it's common knowledge that the provincial police doesn't commonly stop anyone on a (100km/h) highway at 118 or under, so you'll see most people drive 116-118 if conditions allow.
One SQ officer in the Rigaud region told me he doesn't stop anyone under 130km/h (typically the speed at which a lot of Ontarians drive.) I don't intend to test that out too often.
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Old Sep 11, 19, 1:35 pm
  #23  
 
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Let us know how this turns out, but I believe that really the only way to formally challenge the ticket is to go back to the designated courthouse and appear.


Originally Posted by johnmcq View Post
A few weeks back, I received a speeding ticket on Highway 20 near Montmagny. The officer asked if I spoke French. I said “no.” All he said then was, “you were speeding.”

He left without telling me specifically how fast I’d been going. He returned with a ticket for driving 133 km/hr in a 100 km zone. The ticket was in French, which I do not speak. He told me I could request a translation, but left before I could ask any questions.

I couldn’t understand how I could go that fast. To do 133 km, the needle on my speedometer would be straight up, and I hadn't been anywhere near that since we left Chicago ten days earlier. Plus, I’ve been driving since 1967, and I’ve never had a speeding ticket.

So, I carefully exited my car and went back to his to tell him that I couldn’t understand how I could be going so fast. He was very dismissive and said, “You were going 133 km!” I wanted to ask him how he could be so sure (radar, etc.), but he stared straight ahead and wouldn't acknowledge me.

From the time we left Edmundston that morning, and all the way to Quebec City, numerous cars with Quebec license plates passed me by. Right before I got the ticket, two cars went roaring by me. I thought the officer was going after one of them. I might have been speeding slightly, but it was no more than 4 or 5 km, and that was to avoid being rear-ended.

I spoke to the front desk at my Quebec hotel Everyone urged me to contest the ticket. I called the proper authority and followed his directions. I'm told that I'll receive a response in six to eight months.

Two questions after all of this: has anyone successfully contested a moving violation in Quebec? And, does anyone know if Quebec reports tickets to Illinois? I was told they do to New York and Massachusetts, but that was all the fellow knew.

ps: While I spotted 2 or 3 squad cars along highways in New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and, to that point, in Quebec, I didn't see anyone pulled over on the Trans Canada before me. Later, on the way home, we saw 3 cars (each about two miles apart) stopped in Ontario.
This isn't true, the only province in Canada that is truly bilingual to my knowledge is New Brunswick. The country has two official languages, but their use and application varies across the country, including for federal services.

Originally Posted by Santander View Post

Correct, La Belle Province has only one official language, and it isn't English. Just like how a French-speaking driver wouldn't get a French ticket in Alberta, why would an English-speaking driver get a French one in Quebec? However, the Quebec government is rather accommodating for English speakers and you should be able to go through most of the process in English.
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Old Sep 14, 19, 3:33 pm
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There are degrees of bilingualism. Ontario is not officially bilingual, but provincial services are and since traffic tickets are a provincial offence notice the ticket paper itself is in both languages. But the parts written in by the police officer will be in English.
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