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Are There Restrictions on Bringing Prescription Ritalin into Canada?

Are There Restrictions on Bringing Prescription Ritalin into Canada?

Old Aug 20, 11, 12:17 am
  #1  
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Are There Restrictions on Bringing Prescription Ritalin into Canada?

Are there restrictions in place that would prevent someone entering Canada to study or work from bringing Ritalin or any other prescription drugs (obviously only for his/her personal use) into Canada?

Would the person need anything more than just the pills inside the original bottle from the pharmacy (showing the prescription information)? I've seen someone mention a medical passport but I'm not sure what a medical passport actually means.
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Old Aug 20, 11, 6:21 am
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as you've posted,

http://www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca/publicati...eng.html#s6x10

http://hc-sc.gc.ca/dhp-mps/compli-co..._tc-tm-eng.php

My suggestion is that any prescription drugs you are bringing in should be clearly identified and should be carried in the original packaging with a label that specifies both what they are and that they are being used under prescription. It is also a good idea to bring a copy of your prescription and a contact number for your doctor.
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Old Sep 15, 11, 1:21 pm
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Had the same question about bringing a similar medication into Canada but will read the above links first. I'm still unclear about something (emphasis mine):

Originally Posted by thatto View Post
My suggestion is that any prescription drugs you are bringing in should be clearly identified and should be carried in the original packaging with a label that specifies both what they are and that they are being used under prescription. It is also a good idea to bring a copy of your prescription and a contact number for your doctor.
I've heard this advice quite a lot over on the TS/S forum and think it's well-intentioned and mostly spot on. What you mean by carrying a copy of the Rx strikes me as potentially problematic if by 'copy' you mean 'photocopy'. In this day and age I wouldn't be surprised in the least to be hassled for carrying around a Xerox of Ritalin and Adderall (or mixed amphetamine salts in the generic). I don't know what the law is here, just thinking in terms of what the average customs officer or security security might perceive. If by copy you mean one of the duplicate Rx receipts with an identical Rx label then that makes sense. Of course, since anything document can be forged or faked (ID, Rxs, etc.) I'm not sure how multiple forms of the copy of the original Rx is helps.
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Old Sep 15, 11, 1:23 pm
  #4  
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Had the same question about bringing a similar medication into Canada but will read the above links first. I'm still unclear about something (emphasis mine):

Originally Posted by thatto View Post
My suggestion is that any prescription drugs you are bringing in should be clearly identified and should be carried in the original packaging with a label that specifies both what they are and that they are being used under prescription. It is also a good idea to bring a copy of your prescription and a contact number for your doctor.
I've heard this advice quite a lot over on the TS/S forum and think it's well-intentioned but what you mean by carrying a copy of the Rx strikes me as potentially problematic if by 'copy' you mean 'photocopy'. In this day and age I wouldn't be surprised in the least to be hassled for carrying around a Xerox of Ritalin and Adderall (or mixed amphetamine salts in the generic) or other Schedule II substance. If by copy you mean one of the duplicate pharmacy receipts with identical info as the Rx label then that makes more sense. Of course, since anything document can be forged or faked (ID, Rxs, etc.) I'm not sure how multiple forms of the copy of the original Rx is helps. FTR, I don't know what the law is about Xeroxing original scripts, just thinking in terms of what the average customs officer or security security might perceive.

ETA: Good reminder about the doctor's phone number -- I thought it was required info by law on the Rx label but just compared labels from different pharmacies and it turns out only some of mine list it.
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