Smoking onboard

Reply

Old May 1, 09, 6:14 pm
  #1  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: London
Programs: BA Gold
Posts: 243
Smoking onboard

In 1998 BA decided to ban smoking onboard all flights, and most customers are much happier flying as a result. Still it baffles me how for years non-smokers would deal with smokers enjoying cigarettes (were cigars allowed?) in the tight confines of an aircraft cabin. The idea that someone would be smoking next to, behind, in front of me and filling the finite cabin air with smoke seems ridiculous to say the least.

But still, smokers exist, and I have to believe that post-meal, in an inebriated, frustrated, confined state, some still get the urge to light up at 36,000 feet. Has anybody ever had experience with a person trying to enjoy a crafty ciggy in the air, and if so what happened 5 seconds after the tobacco was lit?

1998 Article on Smoke Ban

Northwest - Banning Smoking

Smoking On Airplanes - What were we thinking?
dsk7 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old May 1, 09, 7:10 pm
  #2  
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: London
Programs: BA Gold, VS Silver, Alitalia Freccia Alta, Starwood Gold, Hilton Diamond, Accor Platinum
Posts: 391
What one needs is:

http://www.theelectroniccigarette.co.uk/shop/



[Edit: I have not actually tried to use one of these in-flight. I'd be very interested to know if anyone has. A colleague uses one in the office from time to time though]

Last edited by colm; May 1, 09 at 7:24 pm
colm is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old May 1, 09, 9:19 pm
  #3  
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Australia
Programs: NZ *G
Posts: 5,507
I can only recall flying one long haul flight back when smoking was still allowed.. SYD-DPS for a Skydiving comp of all things...

IIRC the "Smoking zone" was toward the rear of the aircraft... which of course meant that it was possible to be in the last row of non-smoking... right in front of the first row of "smoking"...

I can't recall it being too awful.. but then at the time we were quite used to smokers being nearby on trains/buses etc..

I think these days it would be WAAY more noticeable...
trooper is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old May 1, 09, 9:29 pm
  #4  
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Australia
Programs: NZ *G
Posts: 5,507
I can only recall flying one long haul flight back when smoking was still allowed.. SYD-DPS for a Skydiving comp of all things...

IIRC the "Smoking zone" was toward the rear of the aircraft... which of course meant that it was possible to be in the last row of non-smoking... right in front of the first row of "smoking"...

I can't recall it being too awful.. but then at the time we were quite used to smokers being nearby on trains/buses etc..

I think these days it would be WAAY more noticeable...
trooper is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old May 1, 09, 10:12 pm
  #5  
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Programs: BAEC GGL, LTG & CCR; IC RA; Hilton D (free from BA)
Posts: 320
I recall BA Long Haul in Club in the cradle seat days. Upstairs was non smoking and downstairs was smoking. It was to and from Japan, so of course there was no problem getting a seat upstairs.

How times have changed.

What was the rule in First Class? Never got in there in those days.
IThink is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old May 1, 09, 10:25 pm
  #6  
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Seattle, WA
Programs: Mucci Diamond Hairbrush Elite, AA Plat, BA Blue, and a host of others.
Posts: 364
I remember the smoking days. It was awful. The only barrier to the smoke was a little card attached to the last seat in the non-smoking section telling you the next row was smoking.

Back in those days smoking was allowed in a lot of places though and I suppose we were just used to it.
dfotn is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old May 1, 09, 10:58 pm
  #7  
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Toronto (YYZ)
Posts: 6,104
I recall Air Canada was the first airline to ban smoking network wide. Being a non-smoker I specifically would choose Air Canada over other carriers including BA because of the ban. It's not just for health reasons but safety as-well. Airline seats are extremely flammable
imverge is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old May 2, 09, 12:01 am
  #8  
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Programs: Lord OPebble - Mucci of the Hour. Diamond Class MUCCI.Chevalier du Circle Intime de Pucci
Posts: 7,088
In shorthaul the last row(s) of CE were smoking as were the first row(s) of ET.

As the airflow seems to go from front to rear this meant that south of the curtain everybody got to enjoy passive smoking!
OPebble is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old May 2, 09, 1:17 am
  #9  
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: 16 Miles From ABZ
Programs: BA Bronze
Posts: 363
Originally Posted by dsk7 View Post
In 1998 BA decided to ban smoking onboard all flights, and most customers are much happier flying as a result. Still it baffles me how for years non-smokers would deal with smokers enjoying cigarettes (were cigars allowed?) in the tight confines of an aircraft cabin. The idea that someone would be smoking next to, behind, in front of me and filling the finite cabin air with smoke seems ridiculous to say the least.

But still, smokers exist, and I have to believe that post-meal, in an inebriated, frustrated, confined state, some still get the urge to light up at 36,000 feet. Has anybody ever had experience with a person trying to enjoy a crafty ciggy in the air, and if so what happened 5 seconds after the tobacco was lit?

1998 Article on Smoke Ban

Northwest - Banning Smoking

Smoking On Airplanes - What were we thinking?
About 5 years ago on a BA flight from LHR to SIN an elderly (I suspect well into her 80's) German woman in front of us decided to light up. No one said anything but you could see the consternation in passengers faces as the tell tale smell of smoke drifted further and further through the cabin! It finally reached the nose of a FA and they politely identified the source and advised the woman that this was not allowed. From her reactions thereafter it was quite clear that she was well aware that smoking was prohibited.
charlesrhona is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old May 2, 09, 2:06 am
  #10  
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Programs: IHG Plat, Accor gold, M&M FTL, BA Blue, A3 *Gold
Posts: 1,356
Worst of all was that towards the end of the smoking-on-aircraft era, most smokers would prefer to sit in non-smoking, and try and light up in a free "smoking" seat (smoking while standing in the aisle was not allowed).
I remember checking in late-ish for an Alitalia flight ex FCO in the mid-1990s. The only seats left in Y were in the last row of the DC9, which also was the last row of "smoking". The seat next to me remained empty. Result: that seat became the "smoking" seat for a succession of smokers who had bagged seats in the non-smoking section (one commenting that she "really hates the smell") but still couldn't live without a nicotine fix for an intra-Europe flight. It was like sitting next to a chain smoker The crew was supportive only in that they moved the two of us in the last row from "aisle and middle" to "middle and window", for ease of access to the chain smoking seat, and in that they insisted on some kind of orderly queue being formed... That was my first time on Alitalia, and I have actively avoided it ever since - only one more flight on AZ since that day, when it really really couldn't be helped.
tom tulpe is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old May 2, 09, 2:50 am
  #11  
2019 FlyerTalk Awards
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: London
Programs: BA - Gold for Life, CCR & GGL; IC Spire Elite Ambassador; Diamond Hilton Honors; Hyatt Discoverist
Posts: 6,608
On one of my 747 flights last year, I heard whilst I was in the F galley that someone had been smoking in the rear toilets, but it seemed that the crew had not identified the person in time. I assumed that an alarm had gone off on the flight deck and/or CSD's office from the smoke detectors.
TravellerFrequently is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old May 2, 09, 2:52 am
  #12  
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Programs: BAEC Gold, BMI Gold, BA PP Amex, IC Royal Ambassador, Tesco Blue, Shell V-Power, Library Card
Posts: 346
Originally Posted by imverge View Post
Airline seats are extremely flammable
Really? I thought all interior materials had to be tested to ensure that they aren't flammable...
theaxe is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old May 2, 09, 2:55 am
  #13  
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Switzerland
Programs: BA Gold, LH Sen, SPG Plat
Posts: 779
Also still in the smoking-on-board era, smoking Finnair customers had apparently complained that sitting in the back makes them second class citizens. AY then came up with the brilliant solution (on the 2-3 seating DC9:s of the time) to make all AC seats smoking and the DEF side non-smoking

Not surprisingly, this experiment did not last long.
timol is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old May 2, 09, 3:41 am
  #14  
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Programs: AA EXP/LTP 4MM, BA GGL/CCR, HH Dia, SPG Plat/LTP
Posts: 9,172
Originally Posted by imverge View Post
... It's not just for health reasons but safety as-well. Airline seats are extremely flammable
Originally Posted by theaxe View Post
Really? I thought all interior materials had to be tested to ensure that they aren't flammable...
Originally Posted by henkybaby View Post
... I have to agree with the confiscation of all items that can be soaked or saturated with liquid 'contaminants'.

That is if you still believe that liquid explosives that are dangerous in <1000 ml are a fact of life....
Yes, it's not the seats that are flammable, it's what's in the seats that is.
onobond is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old May 2, 09, 4:06 am
  #15  
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 2,774
BA used to allow cigars to be smoked in the rear cabin on concorde, in fact they were a part of the catering. BA nearly got into a lot of trouble when the US customs people realised they were offering Cuban cigars!!
adrianjc32 is offline  
Reply With Quote

Thread Tools
Search this Thread