A wee doch 'n dorrus

Old Dec 1, 04, 5:41 pm
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A wee doch 'n dorrus

Translation, please. Spelling correction need, too, I think.
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Old Dec 1, 04, 5:48 pm
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a wee doch 'n' doris
a parting dram at the door or one for the road
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Old Dec 1, 04, 5:56 pm
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As in:

Ah've bin wi' a coupla ma cronies
A yin or twa pals a ma ain
We went intae a hotel
An' we did very well
An' then we came oot once again
An' then we went intae anither
An't tha' is the reason ah'm fu'
We had six doch an' dorises
Sang a few choruses
Listen, ah'll sing wan tae you...

Ah belang tae Glesca... (etc, etc)
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Old Dec 1, 04, 6:09 pm
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Nope. Still not getting it.
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Old Dec 1, 04, 6:44 pm
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Without pertaining to any Teuchter roots (Jenbel, please note ), a brief google would indicate that a "A wee Doch and Dorris" is a whisky and a beer chaser. (can also mean just one for the road as GregM indicated) It is not Gaelic, but it is broad Scots (of course being Edinburgh educated, broad Scots is a concept that one simply does not understand )
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Old Dec 2, 04, 3:51 am
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Wow - I didn't know that one <hangs head in shame> - but then I amn't a teuchter

(emm - shouldn't that be a beer with a whisky chaser anyway?)
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Old Dec 2, 04, 4:53 am
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Originally Posted by Shuttle-Bored
Without pertaining to any Teuchter roots (Jenbel, please note ), a brief google would indicate that a "A wee Doch and Dorris" is a whisky and a beer chaser. (can also mean just one for the road as GregM indicated) It is not Gaelic, but it is broad Scots (of course being Edinburgh educated, broad Scots is a concept that one simply does not understand )
it is not far removed from Gaelic, and as such would suggest such at the risk of being flamed by all the broad Scots here.

Deoch is the Irish Gaelic for Drink

Doras is the Irish Gaelic for Door.

I would imagine it is closer to Scots Gaelic than simply broad or colloquial Scot's English

P
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Old Dec 2, 04, 5:06 am
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Originally Posted by pdotie

I would imagine it is closer to Scots Gaelic than simply broad or colloquial Scot's English

P
Ouch there are quite a few authorities who believe that Lallans/Dorric/Scots is a separate language in its own right (albeit pretty much extinct due to English cultural genocide from 1745 onwards), rather than a colloquial form of English. Certainly, I know I don't speak it - I can sometimes understand what is being said, it I take it slow and concentrate hard, and I know I can use words and syntax from it.... but I can't speak Scots

As for the origin of the phrase in question, yep, looks like of Gaelic origin... thanks for the info

Last edited by Jenbel; Dec 2, 04 at 5:09 am Reason: spelling
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Old Dec 2, 04, 12:01 pm
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The late QM had a racehorse called 'deoch an doras', which a trainer once told me was (in its purest and cleanest meaning) Scots gaelic for "shut the door". I think its meaning has since mutated into broad Scots as something along the lines of 'one for the road' (not that alcohol plays any important cultural role north of the border )
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Old Dec 2, 04, 12:41 pm
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Have you seen the Scottish Parliament 'wabsite'? Hours of fun... makes me want to dig out my old broons annuals.
http://www.scottish.parliament.uk/vl...cots/index.htm
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Old Dec 2, 04, 1:04 pm
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Originally Posted by GregM
Have you seen the Scottish Parliament 'wabsite'? Hours of fun... makes me want to dig out my old broons annuals.
http://www.scottish.parliament.uk/vl...cots/index.htm
LOL

How I miss living north of the border. Thanks for cheering up a chilly London evening
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Old Dec 2, 04, 1:21 pm
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Talking Ever tried The Dialectizer?

When you get tired of Scots / Gaelic / English ...

Try out The Dialectizer.

I like Jive the best. Choose it from the drop-down list and key in a well-known URL ... dare I say, such as www.rtwman.co.uk.

See what happens ...........
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Old Dec 2, 04, 2:32 pm
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Originally Posted by GregM
Have you seen the Scottish Parliament 'wabsite'? Hours of fun... makes me want to dig out my old broons annuals.
http://www.scottish.parliament.uk/vl...cots/index.htm
Jings, crivens and help ma'boab!
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Old Dec 2, 04, 3:10 pm
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Shuttle-Bored was sort of right - doch n’ dorrus is not Ghàidhlig itself but it is 'Scoticised' Ghàidhlig. There are quite a few words that came from Ghàidhlig in Scots, and in Doric and Lallans too. The phrase comes from ‘deoch aig an doras’ (a drink (deoch) at the door (doras)) which when spoken or sung, as happens in most languages, contracts to deoch ‘an doras’. In Ghàidhlig it’s usage is akin to the phrases in English ‘one for the ditch’ or ‘one for the road’. The queen mothers trainer must have been on the deoch as much as his/her boss was - ‘dùin an doras’ would be close/shut the door. Biglar - tha mi an dòchas gun d’fhreagairt mi do cheist (I hope that I have answered your question).

Last edited by djb25; Dec 2, 04 at 3:14 pm Reason: my english spelling is not waht it used to be
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