Way so many planes out of service?

Old Sep 18, 23, 1:13 am
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Why so many planes out of service?

Have I just been unlucky recently or is there a trend that more and more BA planes keep getting grounded with technical issues? Just this weekend G-DBCD for example, and I had another one in August on one of G-GATx

Last edited by petter2; Sep 18, 23 at 1:35 am
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Old Sep 18, 23, 2:55 am
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It is sadly the inevitable consequence of heavy cut backs in engineering resources which has now come back to bite. However to be clear, the fleet is also being worked hard now as demand recovers more strongly than seat supply, compounded by 787 engine issues, delayed deliveries of new frames.
But absolutely no suggestion corners are being cut. Its otherwise just one of those things.
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Old Sep 18, 23, 3:48 am
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Originally Posted by Mutu
It is sadly the inevitable consequence of heavy cut backs in engineering resources which has now come back to bite. However to be clear, the fleet is also being worked hard now as demand recovers more strongly than seat supply, compounded by 787 engine issues, delayed deliveries of new frames.
But absolutely no suggestion corners are being cut. Its otherwise just one of those things.
I thought the 787 engine fixes were completed long ago?
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Old Sep 18, 23, 4:43 am
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Originally Posted by Mutu
It is sadly the inevitable consequence of heavy cut backs in engineering resources which has now come back to bite. However to be clear, the fleet is also being worked hard now as demand recovers more strongly than seat supply, compounded by 787 engine issues, delayed deliveries of new frames.
But absolutely no suggestion corners are being cut. Its otherwise just one of those things.
Not sure what 787 engine issues have to do with problems on the LGW Airbus fleet.
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Old Sep 18, 23, 5:47 am
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Originally Posted by petter2
Have I just been unlucky recently or is there a trend that more and more BA planes keep getting grounded with technical issues? Just this weekend G-DBCD for example, and I had another one in August on one of G-GATx
The A350 to AUS had a 'technical issue' which had a knock-on delay last week. Then I noticed the A350 to SAN also got cancelled due to a 'technical issue' (probably as they were going to use the incoming delayed A350). My IAH flight got cancelled last Tuesday, too.
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Old Sep 18, 23, 6:12 am
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In addition, United has stood up an A check-capable maintenance centre at LHR and is renovating a hangar to accommodate -- only its second such base outside US territory -- and to support the operation has, I understand, lured away some BA mechanics / engineers with 787 expertise, which leaves BA a talent deficit.

https://www.unitedtechops.com/news-and-events
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Old Sep 20, 23, 2:15 pm
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Its not just a shortage of engineers, there are significant supply issues with spare parts as well. Brexit isnt helping as its taking significantly longer to get them into the UK than previously.
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Old Sep 20, 23, 3:13 pm
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G-DBCC had a lightning strike coming back from GLA on Sunday. Those who had been bussed to the aircraft for the outbound to BRU witnessed the flight crew, engineers and even the cabin crew inspecting damage to the underside of the aircraft in multiple locations, were returned to the terminal and had to walk to a T5B gate for an A320 to operate the service.
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Old Sep 20, 23, 3:56 pm
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Originally Posted by Confus
Its not just a shortage of engineers, there are significant supply issues with spare parts as well. Brexit isnt helping as its taking significantly longer to get them into the UK than previously.
Given Airbus operates a global supply chain to customer airlines, the majority of which are non EU, what's the pain point Brexit brings today? Genuine question?
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Old Yesterday, 11:07 am
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Originally Posted by skipness1E
Given Airbus operates a global supply chain to customer airlines, the majority of which are non EU, what's the pain point Brexit brings today? Genuine question?
Most parts stores are held on mainland Europe for easiest distribution across the continent. Pre-Brexit there were no customs checks at all into the UK… now there are. If you have an aircraft unable to fly, however many hours it takes to clear is extra time it can’t be used. Anecdotally there are also suppliers who prefer not to deal with UK customers because of the additional paperwork requirements, though I don’t have any personal evidence of that. If true though it would mean a smaller supply pool as well.

Very few replacement parts are supplied by or from Airbus. You’re right it puts the UK in the same position as (for example) Thailand, but the situation there hasn’t changed whereas it has here. UK airlines are slowly adjusting to the ‘new normal’ by planning extended downtime (which will of course also lead to higher fares).
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Old Yesterday, 11:16 am
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Originally Posted by skipness1E
Given Airbus operates a global supply chain to customer airlines, the majority of which are non EU, what's the pain point Brexit brings today? Genuine question?
Already answered, but maybe the UK previously had an advantage over other parts of the world that now it doesn't? That's how free trade areas work. (Nearly) every country in the world operates a global supply chain, but obviously those within an area with beneficial trade agreements will find moving goods about easier.

It's quite rare for countries to voluntarily choose to make trading harder.
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Old Yesterday, 4:13 pm
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Minus brexit and the delay in parts. BA have made this situation their own doing.

BA while getting new aircraft in, are still operating quite an old fleet. Some of A319/20 and 777s are approaching 25years old (and older) . The current pipeline of new aircraft is nowhere near sufficient to replace what they have.

These aircraft are being flown much harder to make up for the lack of new aircraft deliveries and a full schedule, add in staff attrition moving to United etc. its a perfect storm.
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