On Board Dog & Allergy

Old Mar 16, 23, 11:51 pm
  #61  
 
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Originally Posted by Dagny T.
LAX to GDL, counted 21 wheelchairs into 737.
HNL-SFO, unreal. probably 30 chairs on a UA 777.

But also the flight I got stiffed on a pluspoint upgrade request and stuck in middle premium between "sleepers" and the exact same aircraft I flew GUM-HNL in Polaris so I'm especially bitter. LOL
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Old Mar 17, 23, 1:45 am
  #62  
 
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I suggest we need a hierarchy of "my needs trump yours" wiki. I suspect people with nut allergies would be at the top, then followed by those who have their emotional support animals, then those who are allergic to dogs, etc.
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Old Mar 17, 23, 3:34 am
  #63  
 
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Originally Posted by thbe
Not much to worry about that.

Its like wheelchairs for boarding/deboarding. Obviously less than 10% of those who use that service really need that service. Always funny to watch 85 year old Japanese people walking to their seats and at the same time 60 year old - not disabled - Indian people getting pushed in a wheelchair, often accompanied by up to a dozen of their relatives. For some reasons some of them who deboarded in wheelchairs can be watched walking around in the lounge later. There is no medical reason, why sometimes there are dozens of wheelchairs at a gate at AUH or DBX, if there is a plan arriving from India, but almost none, if the plane is arriving from Japan. The easiest way to heal the world is to charge a fee for the wheelchair service at airports.

Same for emotional support animals and US citizens. Most of them dont really need an ESA, they are just abusing the system. And of course, cats and dogs are cute animals. While there are about 50% more people living in the EU than in the US, there are 20 times more ESA in the US than in the EU. Americans are not 30 times more likely to suffer psychological problems than Europeans.
Can I just point out there is a world of difference between walking a few feet in a lounge to grab something from a buffet and having to walk the long distance to/from a gate and then potentially have to stand in a queue for maybe an hour or so. Although I agree I think a lot of people do abuse the system so a small charge or having to pre-register with proof would be a good idea.
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Old Mar 17, 23, 3:43 am
  #64  
 
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Originally Posted by argonath
So basically this should be in the AA forum then ?
I'm glad it's here. First, I learnt a bit about BA's policy (and AA's); second and more importantly for me, if it were in the AA forum I wouldn't have read it. I've found it interesting.

Yes, I should click around and find other interesting forums on Flyertalk to read, but I like this one.
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Old Mar 17, 23, 3:45 am
  #65  
 
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Originally Posted by thbe
Its like wheelchairs for boarding/deboarding. Obviously less than 10% of those who use that service really need that service. Always funny to watch 85 year old Japanese people walking to their seats and at the same time 60 year old - not disabled - Indian people getting pushed in a wheelchair, often accompanied by up to a dozen of their relatives. For some reasons some of them who deboarded in wheelchairs can be watched walking around in the lounge later. There is no medical reason, why sometimes there are dozens of wheelchairs at a gate at AUH or DBX, if there is a plan arriving from India, but almost none, if the plane is arriving from Japan. The easiest way to heal the world is to charge a fee for the wheelchair service at airports.
Before you get quite so judgy about this, step back and take a moment - I have some personal experience in this area thanks to a parent who struggled for a number of years with restricted mobility until they could have some surgery to restore "normal". Please take a moment to hear me out...

The nature of their mobility issue consisted of three main things relevant to travelling through an airport:
* They could not stand for long periods of more than 5-10 minutes at a time - so no long queues at check-in, security, boarding.
* They could not walk very fast - so last minute gate changes don't work out well.
* They could not climb or descend steps quickly, and steep steps they couldn't deal with at all - so no walking down to the apron, and remote stands with airstairs, not a good combination - but a normal jetbridge, with level boarding, no problem at all.

The airlines offer them only *one* solution - bung them in a wheelchair - one size fits all. It's this which is the problem.

They sure as hell didn't want to be pushed around in a wheelchair, taking up time and resources. They felt stupid, because they knew they could walk. They just couldn't cope with a 60 minute security queue, or airstairs, or a last minute gate change or late notice gate assignment.

The nature of the solution from the airlines is to provide for the lowest common denominator.

So when you see someone who was loaded and unloaded with assistance, but seems to be able to walk unaided later, bear in mind that the wheelchair is usually the *only* option made available to them, regardless of how individual their real support needs are.
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Old Mar 17, 23, 3:54 am
  #66  
 
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Originally Posted by Tobias-UK
On which airline did you travel to DFW? BA do not allow emotional support animals in the passenger cabin, only recognised service dogs. In that case the Equality Act would likely kick in and trump your allergy.
Probably best renamed as the Inequality Act in that case...
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Old Mar 17, 23, 4:00 am
  #67  
 
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Originally Posted by Visconti
PS - Why can't animals travel in the cargo hold? Cruelty or something?
We don't put human-beings in the cargo hold, do we? Why should we put other animals there? It can be extremely stressful for them in the hold to the point that they can die (although extremely rare). BA partners with a specialized company and pets are actually looked after throughout the journey but that is not the case with all airlines (although some airlines do allow cats and dogs up to a certain size/weight in the cabin, which is a nicer way to travel for all involved).
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Old Mar 17, 23, 4:01 am
  #68  
 
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Originally Posted by mjh0
So when you see someone who was loaded and unloaded with assistance, but seems to be able to walk unaided later, bear in mind that the wheelchair is usually the *only* option made available to them, regardless of how individual their real support needs are.
Yes.

My thoughts are not primarily based on how travelers in wheelchairs behave in the lounge. Most of them by far dont have access to a lounge. That is why they use prio boarding in wheelchairs for themselves and for their family&friends.

Its based on the very different numbers of wheelchairs for different flights. The record Ive seen for a single flight was 53 (EY in AUH from India). Thats more or less the same number of wheelchairs Ive seen on all my hundreds of European flights in my life together.
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Old Mar 17, 23, 4:04 am
  #69  
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The lack of knowledge about PRM and disability displayed in this thread is sad and infuriating to read.
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Old Mar 17, 23, 4:39 am
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Originally Posted by duggie1982
I mean, the whole peanut thing happens IMO far to often and think some people exaggerate, come in, banning the whole flight with peanuts, mad 😠
As a parent of a child with a severe peanut allergy, I beg to differ. Having had to administer life saving epi pen shots is not something to take lightly, Missing out on some peanuts for a few hours is hardly the end of the world is it now
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Old Mar 17, 23, 4:49 am
  #71  
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Originally Posted by Professor Yaffle
As a parent of a child with a severe peanut allergy, I beg to differ. Having had to administer life saving epi pen shots is not something to take lightly, Missing out on some peanuts for a few hours is hardly the end of the world is it now
Yes, but I hope you can see the problem: if 4 people with different spectrums of allergies turned up for one flight, there would be no food, no alcohol and only water available to serve. Fortunately this hypothetical combination of travellers would be a very, very low chance of happening, but you can see why airlines simply work on the basis that it's up to individuals to resolve their health isssues.
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Old Mar 17, 23, 4:55 am
  #72  
 
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Originally Posted by corporate-wage-slave
Yes, but I hope you can see the problem: if 4 people with different spectrums of allergies turned up for one flight, there would be no food, no alcohol and only water available to serve. Fortunately this hypothetical combination of travellers would be a very, very low chance of happening, but you can see why airlines simply work on the basis that it's up to individuals to resolve their health isssues.
You cant really compare serious peanut allergies which can kill with sneezing and the odd rash from being near a dog. People are only prescribed epi-pens if they really need them (trust me, even then they can be very hard to get hold of). But on the flipside, if an allergy sufferer claims they cant fly without something and they havent got their medication, it is their issue and they should be told they cant fly without it.
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Old Mar 17, 23, 5:03 am
  #73  
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Originally Posted by Professor Yaffle
You cant really compare serious peanut allergies which can kill with sneezing and the odd rash from being near a dog. People are only prescribed epi-pens if they really need them (trust me, even then they can be very hard to get hold of). But on the flipside, if an allergy sufferer claims they cant fly without something and they havent got their medication, it is their issue and they should be told they cant fly without it.
All allergies can be potentially serious, and the only thing about peanuts is that it is the most common in the Western hemisphere. I work in this area and I'm familiar with some people who have really wretched lives as a result of their allergies and compromised immune systems. Some people have epi-pens for the risk of anaphylaxis induced by dogs, others for alcohol, others for things like lentils (and they really do get everywhere in mass food production).
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Old Mar 17, 23, 5:21 am
  #74  
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Originally Posted by corporate-wage-slave
Yes, but I hope you can see the problem: if 4 people with different spectrums of allergies turned up for one flight, there would be no food, no alcohol and only water available to serve. Fortunately this hypothetical combination of travellers would be a very, very low chance of happening, but you can see why airlines simply work on the basis that it's up to individuals to resolve their health isssues.
As @Professor Yaffle says, one shouldn’t compare potentially lethal and non-lethal allergies. And, in principle, I see how individuals need to be responsible for their own issues, but if 300 people in the same sealed canister are all provided with a bag of allergen and encouraged to pull and pop it open so that each can discharge a small cloud into the shared environment at the same time, that just doesn’t give anyone a fair chance.
And this is really what this thread is about (at least initially), for the chance to have the opportunity to manage/resolve one’s own health issues, because one of the tools required to accomplish this is information.
But I do think it’s a really good idea to have antihistamines at hand when travelling, at least 10% (maybe 20%) of people will succumb to Angiodema at some point in their lives and not all flights have this kind of medication. I’ve never needed antihistamines in an aircraft before but, since learning about Angiodema, I’ve never put them in the hold luggage. Could be you (any of you) next and at least I get the chance to ask if you would like to take a couple of tablets.
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Old Mar 17, 23, 5:35 am
  #75  
 
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Originally Posted by Professor Yaffle
You cant really compare serious peanut allergies which can kill with sneezing and the odd rash from being near a dog.
Wrong. You really can compare serious peanut allergy to severe dog allergy, and dog allergy can cause death. Severe dog allergy runs in my ex's family, and my kid inherited it. Two of his relatives have died from it, we've made multiple ER visits because of it.

Statistically, cat allergies are more common than dog allergies, but dog allergies have a higher fatality rate.

Originally Posted by Professor Yaffle
People are only prescribed epi-pens if they really need them (trust me, even then they can be very hard to get hold of). But on the flipside, if an allergy sufferer claims they cant fly without something and they havent got their medication, it is their issue and they should be told they cant fly without it.
My's kid's travel bag contains antihistamines, an epi-pen and an asthma inhaler. We don't travel on a public carrier, plane or train, without it.
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