Passport Validity on flight to Ireland

Old Jun 10, 2022, 4:50 pm
  #1  
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Passport Validity on flight to Ireland

(I made a similar thread in the Virgin section, but it's for a different leg of my trip with Virgin, so I wanted to make one here about the other leg with BA specifically as well).

I'm going to be traveling to Ireland for a week on a flight I booked with BA at the beginning of July (in about 5 weeks from now). The flight is from London to Dublin (I'll be staying in London for a week before moving on to Dublin). Unfortunately, I had never heard about passport validity rules until the other week, and my passport expires in January (about 5.5 months from when I leave and return home).

So at this point it's cutting it way too close to send my old passport in the mail to get expedited renewal. But from what I've seen, both the US State Department website and the Irish government websites make it pretty clear that I simply need to have my passport be valid for the duration of my stay (again it will still be valid for over 5 months by the time I leave):

https://travel.state.gov/content/tra...s/Ireland.html

https://www.dfa.ie/irish-embassy/usa...a-and-ireland/

So it seems fairly clear that if the rules are followed, I should be fine. But I just wanted to be extra extra cautious and double-check to see if anyone here has had any prior experience with this in regards to BA flights going to Ireland.

Thanks in advance!
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sld122 is offline  
Old Jun 10, 2022, 5:08 pm
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Originally Posted by sld122
any prior experience with this in regards to BA flights going to Ireland.
This is an odd international route, as if you're a UK or Irish citizen, you don't need a passport. But when you get to Dublin, you'll need to prove your citizenship to the Garda. Catch-22.

For all other nationalities, usual rules apply. I don't see how you can get a better answer than that providing by the embassy,
cauchy is offline  
Old Jun 10, 2022, 9:16 pm
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A 10-year passport is really a 9-1/2-year passport.

It wouldn't hurt to print a copy of the DFA advice and carry it with you. Evidence of your return ticket, too. My experience traveling there on a US passport is that they'll take a good look at your passport and ask how long you're staying. Sometimes I get an entry stamp that is valid until the day after I'm due to depart, even on a short visit; most of the time it's just the standard 90-day permit.
chucko is online now  
Old Jun 11, 2022, 12:25 pm
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The rules vary on a country-by-country basis, so it's always wise to double-check in advance. Several EU countries require non-EU nationals to have a passport with at least 3 months' validity left after the day one plans to leave the country, while EU nationals can enter the Schengen Area even with an expired national ID card or passport. The US requires non-US citizens to have six months' validity left on their passport after the day of departure from the US, however nationals from countries on the so-called six-month club list (which includes most European countries) only need their passports to be valid for the duration of their stay. The Irish govt's official website in your post clearly states that you meet Ireland's entry requirements, so you don't need to worry. Just in case you didn't check, the UK only requires one's passport to be valid for the duration of one's stay as well, so you're OK.
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Old Jun 11, 2022, 12:49 pm
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Travel via Belfast & get the coach.
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Old Jun 11, 2022, 12:51 pm
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Originally Posted by cauchy
This is an odd international route, as if you're a UK or Irish citizen, you don't need a passport. But when you get to Dublin, you'll need to prove your citizenship to the Garda. Catch-22.

For all other nationalities, usual rules apply. I don't see how you can get a better answer than that providing by the embassy,
Surely a passport with any validity (or indeed no validity) is sufficient to prove citizenship? I suspect it's TIMATIC that really counts though.
abligh is offline  
Old Jun 11, 2022, 3:05 pm
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Originally Posted by cauchy
This is an odd international route, as if you're a UK or Irish citizen, you don't need a passport. But when you get to Dublin, you'll need to prove your citizenship to the Garda. Catch-22.

For all other nationalities, usual rules apply. I don't see how you can get a better answer than that providing by the embassy,
You can use a driving licence on UK to Ireland flights. An expired passport should also work.
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Old Jun 11, 2022, 4:04 pm
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Originally Posted by VG31
You can use a driving licence on UK to Ireland flights.
Only if you're a UK or Irish national and your driving license shows it. Normally that's only true if you were born in either of those countries.
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Old Jun 12, 2022, 10:31 am
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For those with EU citizenship, national ID cards are also acceptable for entering Ireland.
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