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Girl with Nut Allergy "Nearly Dies" on BA Flight

Girl with Nut Allergy "Nearly Dies" on BA Flight

Old Jun 8, 22, 7:03 am
  #76  
 
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I'm sorry, if there is a flagged allergy case, and you are asked TWICE to stop eating what you are doing, and the situation evolves into a medical emergency, there should be repercussions for the person who disobeyed crew orders. No questions asked.
Yes its annoying to be restricted on what you can eat (and probably less excusable when airlines can't serve their own meals... maybe time for advance notice of such pax such that menues can be tailored), BUT to endanger life and potentially cause a divert is just not on, whatever way you cut it.
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Old Jun 8, 22, 7:10 am
  #77  
 
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Originally Posted by GBOAC View Post
I'm sorry, if there is a flagged allergy case, and you are asked TWICE to stop eating what you are doing, and the situation evolves into a medical emergency, there should be repercussions for the person who disobeyed crew orders. No questions asked.
The issue is it cannot be proven that the actions of that passenger, selfish though he was, caused the girl to become ill. Anything could have set her off. It could have been a panic attack for all we know.

It's fairly evident she was wearing no mask, and for someone who was supposedly so sensitive to allergens, this was surprising...
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Old Jun 8, 22, 8:02 am
  #78  
 
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Im sat on my second BA flight in 2 days with this announcement. Feels like a very sharp increase in frequency of these. I generally think that if they want to ban passengers from eating nuts then it should be based on scientific evidence that such consumption poses a risk. Im no expert but the posts above suggest such evidence may be lacking.

There does seem to be flexibility if theres a reason for needing to consume peanuts- had a 12 hour night flight recently with an 18mth old, we had packed them some food to have after take off before going to sleep, which was peanut butter sandwiches, and the announcement came on. I was not keen on suffering a hungry and tired toddler so explained to the crew who were ok with it as the passenger was in a different cabin and many rows away. Probably wont risk packing peanut butter sandwiches again though!
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Old Jun 8, 22, 8:33 am
  #79  
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Probably wont risk packing peanut butter sandwiches again though!
Marmalade sandwiches may be safer, and have the Royal seal of approval.
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Old Jun 8, 22, 9:26 am
  #80  
 
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Interesting debate this one. Is the passenger selfish for eating the nuts, or is the person with the allergy selfish to expect hundred(s) of other people to jump to their tune in order to de-risk a journey that it may be unwise for them to take?

I did read somewhere that AA didn't let a nut allergy sufferer on a plane once because they were serving nuts. I think BA should either come down on one side or the other on this, either they don't accommodate those with nut allergies or they drop nuts from their menus completely. Everyone eating their complementary nuts on the previous sector is probably higher risk than somebody 10 rows in front


Originally Posted by BOH View Post
Sometimes I think society has got to a point whereby many people having a disability / allergy / anxiety / phobia etc etc firmly believe that their needs trump the needs of all others in their immediate vicinity and they believe they have the right to demand all others comply with what they want. Maybe even bordering on attention seeking at times.
Cue Vegans demanding nobody eat meat on the plane.

Originally Posted by KARFA View Post
Sometimes the best thing is just to ignore rather than take the bait
Sometimes one can't help oneself.....

Originally Posted by Keystone View Post
I suppose if your wheelchair bound or visually handicapped you should also be kept off the flight.
Of course not, as neither would impact the level of comfort of the other passengers.

Not knowing the difference between "your" and "you're" is grounds enough to be kept off the flight forums however.
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Old Jun 8, 22, 9:39 am
  #81  
 
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Originally Posted by labdoctor View Post
The issue is it cannot be proven that the actions of that passenger, selfish though he was, caused the girl to become ill. Anything could have set her off. It could have been a panic attack for all we know.

It's fairly evident she was wearing no mask, and for someone who was supposedly so sensitive to allergens, this was surprising...
If someone was instructed twice to stop eating nuts thats enough for me. Whether this led to an allergy incident or a panic attack is, Id have thought, unlikely to be proven. What maybe clear is someone ignored crew instructions on two occasions, if thats what happened.
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Old Jun 8, 22, 9:50 am
  #82  
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So I’ve kept out of this but here in my opinion and some of you are not going to like it.
If you have a life threatening condition it is your responsibility (or if you are under age) your parents to not put you in a dangerous situation.
A flight on a commercial aircraft is public transport and you should not be expecting others to keep you out of danger, I know it’s harsh but you need to either don’t fly or fly privately.
We request that other customers do not consume any nuts or not based product. REQUEST.
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Old Jun 8, 22, 11:04 am
  #83  
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I have a bit of a back problem, from which I have suffered for over 40 years. As a result, the thought of flying l/h in an ‘upright’ seat is completely unrealistic. Therefore, as one with a ‘disability’, should I demand that airlines upgrade me to flat-bed at no cost? Of course not … I seek my own salvation by paying for J or F to ensure I’m able to walk after 6-9+ hours in that sort of seat.

Now extrapolate that line of thought to someone with a severe allergy (as it seems). Would it be wise to expose that individual to what would appear, from widely-available sources, to a severe risk to health or life? As others have noted, the whole process of flying in an aluminium tube simply elevates the risk to that individual. It doesn’t strike me as a good idea.
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Old Jun 13, 22, 9:06 am
  #84  
 
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Independent today, Re Turkish. { Yes I know not BA but relevant for the topic I think. }

https://www.independent.co.uk/travel...-b2099623.html
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Old Jun 13, 22, 9:40 am
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Originally Posted by labdoctor View Post
The issue is it cannot be proven that the actions of that passenger, selfish though he was, caused the girl to become ill. Anything could have set her off. It could have been a panic attack for all we know.

It's fairly evident she was wearing no mask, and for someone who was supposedly so sensitive to allergens, this was surprising...

panic attacks dont cause anaphylactic shock though
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Old Jun 13, 22, 9:47 am
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Originally Posted by firstlight View Post
Peanut induced anaphylaxis is obviously a problem although maybe not an issue in this case as some have said it might have been a panic attack but not pleasant for anyone involved.

I understand there are desensitizing treatments on the NHS to reduce the effect of the allergen, if someone eating nuts 10 rows away can have an life threatening effect then clearly this is something that should be considered by the girl's family, and Thailand at least should not be in their travel plans...
anecdote here: a friend of mines son did this protocol in the US and he failed the challenge. Some people have it so bad, they never become desensitized



I agree with most people here on various points: airlines should stop with the nuts and the girl should never travel anywhere unless in her own car. The bottom line for me as a parent is forget what should or should not happen in her travels. It sounds like for her and her situation, just dont is the reasonable solution.
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Old Jun 13, 22, 10:52 am
  #87  
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Originally Posted by whitewave View Post
panic attacks dont cause anaphylactic shock though
There is quite an overlap on the symptoms, dizziness, sweating, clammy skin, irregular and rapid breathing, shaking, a physical fear of what is happening to them and their body, very rapid heartbeat. There's a priority order in this, and things like heartbeat and breathing issues are at the top of that, and so there would be a natural tendency to progress to the adrenaline auto-injector if these symptoms were presented along with a history of allergy along with the presence of the epi-pen. Administering an epi-pen is very low risk so if in doubt you do that, and unless it's definitely over, a second epi-pen 5 minutes later in the other thigh. I've done about half a dozen of these, and in all cases they were panic attacks. The other thing to do in this scenario is to keep the patient calm (to reduce pressure on the body and airways), on the floor, but raise the legs to improve circulation to the brain and key organs. You would do the same with a definite panic attack. Panic attacks can take about 30 minutes to get over and usually result in no direct problems thereafter. However they are absolutely terrifying for both the patient and the patient's family, it is a genuine medical episode and not a pleasant one.
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Old Jun 13, 22, 11:00 am
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Originally Posted by corporate-wage-slave View Post
There is quite an overlap on the symptoms, dizziness, sweating, clammy skin, irregular and rapid breathing, shaking, a physical fear of what is happening to them and their body, very rapid heartbeat. There's a priority order in this, and things like heartbeat and breathing issues are at the top of that, and so there would be a natural tendency to progress to the adrenaline auto-injector if these symptoms were presented along with a history of allergy along with the presence of the epi-pen. Administering an epi-pen is very low risk so if in doubt you do that, and unless it's definitely over, a second epi-pen 5 minutes later in the other thigh. I've done about half a dozen of these, and in all cases they were panic attacks. The other thing to do in this scenario is to keep the patient calm (to reduce pressure on the body and airways), on the floor, but raise the legs to improve circulation to the brain and key organs. You would do the same with a definite panic attack. Panic attacks can take about 30 minutes to get over and usually result in no direct problems thereafter. However they are absolutely terrifying for both the patient and the patient's family, it is a genuine medical episode and not a pleasant one.
I agree. We are a panic attack family. Yes, panic attacks are a legit medical episode.

Swelling of the airway could be mistaken for hyperventilation I suppose. Im not going to die on this hill because as you mention, administering an epi pen is low risk.

I will err on the side of that since a man was eating peanuts and didnt stop when asked, that this was a legit anaphylactic episode.
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Old Jun 13, 22, 11:05 am
  #89  
 
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A request on both our outbound and inbound flights to Nice this weekend not to eat nuts .
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