"The" Concorde

Old Mar 9, 21, 8:17 am
  #1  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Los Angeles
Programs: BA Silver
Posts: 22
"The" Concorde

Hi everyone, I know that in British English, Concorde is used without article. Is that true for American English, too? I'm currently writing a text (originally in German) about Concorde, and my (American) translator told me that in the US, it's commonly called "the Concorde". Would be thankful if someone could confirm that... I did find some articles (New York Times, CNN...) which use the article, but then, it could well be that the journalists just didn't know better.
JanBre is offline  
Old Mar 9, 21, 8:35 am
  #2  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: London, UK
Posts: 5,062
No article or the indefinite article. Air France had six operational aircraft and British Airways had seven. Plus the prototypes.
Dave_C is offline  
Old Mar 9, 21, 8:41 am
  #3  
 
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 296
US english does tend to use the article. It sounds odd, but it is normal in America.

British english, Concorde.
This said I think it is the only aricraft without an article. I've never heard 'I flew on Trident to Paris...' So actually American english is being consistant, if lacking in class!
IBJoel and SxMan like this.
GBOAC is offline  
Old Mar 9, 21, 9:14 am
  #4  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: London, UK
Posts: 5,062
Originally Posted by GBOAC View Post
US english does tend to use the article. It sounds odd, but it is normal in America.

British english, Concorde.
This said I think it is the only aricraft without an article. I've never heard 'I flew on Trident to Paris...' So actually American english is being consistant, if lacking in class!
But the indefinite article is perfectly acceptable in British English too. "I flew on a Concorde to New York. I flew on a Trident to Paris."
Dave_C is offline  
Old Mar 9, 21, 9:58 am
  #5  
 
Join Date: Apr 2018
Location: LON, between FAB and EGTD
Programs: AA Exec Plat, BA nobody (blue)
Posts: 310
Originally Posted by Dave_C View Post
But the indefinite article is perfectly acceptable in British English too. "I flew on a Concorde to New York. I flew on a Trident to Paris."
But then no-one would say "I flew on the Trident to Paris". Oddly I think people DO say "the Concorde" in England. It's really short for "the Concorde service", like saying you took THE train to the airport.
tjcxx is offline  
Old Mar 9, 21, 10:08 am
  #6  
FlyerTalk Evangelist
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: TPA for now. Hopefully LIS for retirement
Programs: Southwest A-List+ due to work. Paid F or Biz for pleasure so not a mileage junkie
Posts: 11,208
Originally Posted by Dave_C View Post
No article or the indefinite article. Air France had six operational aircraft and British Airways had seven. Plus the prototypes.
Disagree. Americans would definitely say "THE Concorde."

Originally Posted by Dave_C View Post
But the indefinite article is perfectly acceptable in British English too. "I flew on a Concorde to New York. I flew on a Trident to Paris."
Here too, Americans would tend to say "I flew on THE Concorde to New York" (even though there were more than one of them).
clkc86 and IBJoel like this.
Bear96 is offline  
Old Mar 9, 21, 10:15 am
  #7  
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: UK
Programs: BA Gold, Hilton Diamond
Posts: 2,100
Originally Posted by Bear96 View Post


Here too, Americans would tend to say "I flew on THE Concorde to New York" (even though there were more than one of them).
Another thing I noticed they say in the US is adding "the" to airport names. For example "I'm going to the New Orleans Airport later."
Schwann is offline  
Old Mar 9, 21, 10:20 am
  #8  
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 795
Definitely with article in the USA. There were twenty Concordes, so a lack of an article simply does not make sense in American English. In fact most people would probably go with the indefinite 'a' over the definite 'the' because there were more than one, but this would be affected by the context, as well. The would be referring to the category of airplane, while a would be for a be inferring a single member of that category. A proper name (sans article) would be alluding to one specific item/object/person/etc. If there was one specific Concorde that was named 'Concorde,' you could get away with omitting the 'the', but even then, 'the' still works perfectly well as a definite article and would probably be the preferred option.
downinit is offline  
Old Mar 9, 21, 10:31 am
  #9  
Moderator: British Airways Executive Club, Marriott Bonvoy
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Englandshire
Programs: SPG LT Plat, BA G, BD*LG, MG Blue+ ...
Posts: 13,291
Originally Posted by downinit View Post
There were twenty Concordes, so a lack of an article simply does not make sense ...
Looking at this from a different angle, does ‘Concorde’ refer to a specific airframe, or does it refer to a wider concept of brand and service ?

See also ‘Eurostar’, for example.
Oxon Flyer is offline  
Old Mar 9, 21, 10:53 am
  #10  
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 3,198
I see lots of English writing by overseas students and articles appear frequently where a native speaker (writer) would never use them. They are probably writing American English rather the proper English.

Maybe the ancient brits used that form and when taken to America by The Mayflower it persisted while here the usage died out?
kanderson1965 likes this.
Greenpen is offline  
Old Mar 9, 21, 11:01 am
  #11  
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 1,982
Originally Posted by Oxon Flyer View Post
Looking at this from a different angle, does ‘Concorde’ refer to a specific airframe, or does it refer to a wider concept of brand and service ?

See also ‘Eurostar’, for example.
I see it as this.

I flew Concorde to Barbados
I flew First Class to New York
I flew Club Europe to Paris

None of the above applied to me personally unfortunately but in the product and branding sense they are all correct.
Keystone and Ldnn1 like this.
1Aturnleft is online now  
Old Mar 9, 21, 11:10 am
  #12  
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Westchester Co, NY or Rio Grande Valley, TX or ???
Programs: BAEC G, WN A-, Hyatt G, HH G (via AX Plt), MAR T, Hz PC, was [UA2P, FL A+Elite, BD G]
Posts: 1,895
Originally Posted by Bear96 View Post
Disagree. Americans would definitely say "THE Concorde."


Here too, Americans would tend to say "I flew on THE Concorde to New York" (even though there were more than one of them).
As someone who flew on Concorde, I don't think I ever used the phrase "the Concorde" - I would guess that more Americans would not use "the" in front of Concorde, but maybe it varies by region?
HPN-HRL is offline  
Old Mar 9, 21, 11:31 am
  #13  
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Programs: BAEC Gold; Hilton Gold, IHG Spire, Marriott Titanium, Wyndham Diamond
Posts: 557
It's something only pedants care about, frankly.
Skimo, TravelerMSY and ExpatExp like this.
Mordac is offline  
Old Mar 9, 21, 11:46 am
  #14  
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Programs: BA GGL, AA LTP, Marriott (sigh) Plat Elite
Posts: 1,720
americans would def say THE concorde.

probably because they began their journey in THE concorde room.
IBJoel likes this.
VSLover is offline  
Old Mar 9, 21, 11:48 am
  #15  
 
Join Date: Jun 2019
Programs: Marriott Titanium; WN A-list; UA Silver
Posts: 338
Originally Posted by Greenpen View Post
I see lots of English writing by overseas students and articles appear frequently where a native speaker (writer) would never use them. They are probably writing American English rather the proper English.

Maybe the ancient brits used that form and when taken to America by The Mayflower it persisted while here the usage died out?
My understanding is that quite a few "Americanisms" are britishisms that came over before the revolution and didn't die out (and evolved somewhat). Others are due to influence of various other languages of immigrants.
nmpls is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Search Engine: