“Safest” Club Europe seats

Old Jul 6, 20, 12:50 am
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“Safest” Club Europe seats

We’ll be flying in August to Sardinia to visit family now that we have a relatively safe opportunity window.

I’ve been thinking about what the “safest” seats for a couple might be... I’m tempted to say Row 1 because of the extra space, but at the same time in row 1 you’re close to the “waiting area” for the toilets.

Any thoughts,
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Old Jul 6, 20, 1:10 am
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They are very much discouraging people waiting around any part of either cabin, so that's not the issue. There is an announcement asking people to stay in their seats and only go to the WC if the green lights is illuminated. Personally I'd say you are either ok with the low risk of flying, or you stay at home. Trying the micro-manage the tiny risk factors between different rows of seating would suggest the "stay at home" approach not least because they will be vastly out ranked by Sardinia's road safefy record. But if you are trying to maximise physical distancing, there is still a tendency to select seats at the front of the cabin, so on that point you would best select seats say 2 rows from the back of CE to give yourself the best chance of no-one in front or behind. I guess you would be best to select 2 window seats to maximise the distance from the aisle too, so if that's going to be compromised then I'd stop worrying and reach for the hand sanitiser.
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Old Jul 6, 20, 1:57 am
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I'm no expert in this area but my instinct, if looking to minimise risk specifically during the flight part of your journey, would be to try to avoid having anyone sitting behind you. Now clearly you can't guarantee that as it might change up to (and after) boarding, but looking to get 2 together towards the back (but not the back row) of the CE cabin might mitigate this risk slightly.

I really suspect that the difference in risk between seats is vanishingly small - wasn't there a study recently that said that window seats were far less well cleaned that aisle ones?

The biggest factor - and one you can't control - is whether there is someone on your flight has the virus. The rest probably makes very little difference.
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Old Jul 6, 20, 2:34 am
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Searching the web has some answers:

The article would make you never leave your home again in the Express but then they counter it with this article.

National Geographic have diagrams of how a virus could spread and saying a window seat is better, as per the previous article.

The BBC takes it's usual well balanced approach here.

Like everything you do there is an element of risk. Variables will change depending on time of day, where the plane has just come from, who's on the flight, who stood near you in the terminal, what you touched and did you touch your face. So, picking a seat is just one element to consider. Personally I would wipe down the area around me, bag the wipes safely, sanitise my hands and keep them away from my masked face. If everyone is wearing masks, then that will hopefully reduce the risk of airborne droplets that carry the most risk. Every seat has pluses and minuses to it. I would go for the last seat with no one behind me, but that means passing through more of the cabin and touching something may be contaminated.
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Old Jul 6, 20, 2:46 am
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Let’s simplify this ;-)

Only upper middle class Londoners go to Sardinia, and no-one in London has coronavirus now. You’re fine :-)
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Old Jul 6, 20, 7:46 am
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I've been aiming for 1F (or their long-haul equivalents) on flights in general recently. You're apparently mainly at risk by people up to 2 rows ahead and behind you, so if you don't have anyone ahead of you that removes half of the risk. The left side of the plane gets more action as well as more people sitting there and you presumably be better off by a window than in an aisle.
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Old Jul 6, 20, 10:18 am
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Probably ET and the last row, as you're the last to board and you have no one behind you breathing - tuck yourself into the corner (window).

But really, as other have said if this kind of thing is make or break for you then I think you're not ready to fly because the risk difference between seats is going to be negligible. The odds of someone carrying the disease being sat in your vicinity in CE are going to be the same for every seat assuming even distribution of passengers.
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Old Jul 6, 20, 10:48 am
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I’d probably go for the last row of CE. The back of the cabin is normally the quietest and you’ll also have the curtain behind you, which will act as a barrier if anyone in the row behind coughs/sneezes.
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Old Jul 6, 20, 7:35 pm
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Originally Posted by ringingup View Post
We’ll be flying in August to Sardinia to visit family now that we have a relatively safe opportunity window.

I’ve been thinking about what the “safest” seats for a couple might be... I’m tempted to say Row 1 because of the extra space, but at the same time in row 1 you’re close to the “waiting area” for the toilets.

Any thoughts,
Six or a half dozen. If you’re on the plane you’re going to be at risk one way or another. Don’t stress over it, pick seats, and enjoy the trip.
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Old Jul 7, 20, 3:19 am
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There are multiple factors here, for example flight loads. The people coming on to the plane of positive don’t really spend enough time around you to transmit- although your taught in biology at school And this can be true but rare, the reality is you need a number of virus particles to really increase your risk. Hence those who were face to face with you or within a distance of you for 15m are traced. On a plane generally the two rows in front and two behind along with your row are traced and told to isolate. That doesn’t mean there aren’t cases where someone outside those rows have contracted something, just that the risk reduces significantly. Once seated, if you look at the modelling, allbeit for sneezing, the majority of particles/droplets are channeled by the curvature of the cabin to the window seat.

Im summary, I’d agree with the above, the risk is low on a flight overall but if your worried about which seat, should you be flying. The safest seats are ones in rows furthest from others. Middle seat>aisle seat>window seat on a single aisle aircraft.

This is of course all theoretical. We simple don’t have enough data for real-world behaviour on aircraft for SARS2-CoV-2 and I’m sure there will be others who disagree with my interpretation.
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Old Jul 7, 20, 3:33 am
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I can give you a very scientific answer here....As an ex-smoker, the worst place to be on a plane was by the window.....

Why.......the air conditioning on all aircraft sucks the air towards the window and upwards (or by the floor) as that's where the air goes to be re-cycled. Therefore, anyone sneezing, or coughing, or smoking or even exhaling (God forbid) in the aisle - all their "stuff" is going to be sucked towards the window and whomever is sitting there (I remember sitting next to a woman in business class who smoked 40 Marlboro on our trip back from Hong Kong....I was by the window and everything came my way.....I was pretty sick getting off that plane)

So, I would say an aisle seat is the best place to be as you will only be breathing your stuff before it starts its journey towards the window.
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Old Jul 7, 20, 3:39 am
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Originally Posted by moral_low_ground View Post
I can give you a very scientific answer here....As an ex-smoker, the worst place to be on a plane was by the window.....

Why.......the air conditioning on all aircraft sucks the air towards the window and upwards as that's where the air goes to be re-cycled. Therefore, anyone sneezing, or coughing, or smoking or even exhaling (God forbid) in the aisle - all their "stuff" is going to be sucked towards the window and whomever is sitting there (I remember sitting next to a woman in business class who smoked 40 Marlboro on our trip back from Hong Kong....I was by the window and everything came my way.....I was pretty sick getting off that plane)

So, I would say an aisle seat is the best place to be as you will only be be breathing your stuff before it starts its journey towards the window.
I think it's the other way around now, the flow is generally air comes in from top and side, and flow out of the vents at the bottom. See the Airbus diagram in this article https://news.cgtn.com/news/2020-02-0...WJW/index.html

I am not sure there is an obvious bad place and good place to sit with regard to window, middle, and aisle.
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Old Jul 7, 20, 3:45 am
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Is probably plane specific as well in terms of how the air flows. Either way I agree that there is no particularly safe place to sit that is better than others. Decision is to fly or not and accept whatever risk comes with it
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Old Jul 7, 20, 4:03 am
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Here are a couple of videos of models. important to say that models are only as good as the data that is input, so it is entirely possible that there are inaccuracies, and they were also based on influenza droplets not CoV-19. There are also others who model based purely on times spent in proximity, but cabin shape and furniture does likely have a significant influence, as does airflow. There is strong evidence from China from a toilet vent that ventilation significantly impacts on virus particle flow.


https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/115151...e-coronavirus/

There are also other factors too- such as if your wearing a mask, if the infected pax is wearing a mask, your susceptibility for infections etc.

More important things to do that seat selection;
wash your hands- ideally with soap and water prior to boarding.
wash your hands with alcohol once you’ve boarded.
don’t eat and drink on the flight
minimise talking on the flight
don’t sing
ensure you are well hydrated prior to the flight (non-alcohol)
ensure you eat well generally, take vitamin D supplementation if your not able to get outside much at present.
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Old Jul 7, 20, 7:44 am
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It never occurred to me to seek scientific research and risk analysis in The Sun
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