Clocks Change and BA's Schedule

Old Oct 27, 19, 1:01 am
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Clocks Change and BA's Schedule

Morning,

Currently sitting at home in Windsor and I noticed more planes than normal before 6am. Looking at FR24 there's plenty waiting to land which I'm assuming is due to the changing of the clocks as it's the normal morning rush.

Would anyone be able to explain how the changing of the clocks affects the schedule for BA, if at all?

Sorry if this is a silly question. It's early and I'm curious.

Ta!
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Old Oct 27, 19, 1:25 am
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Airlines adjust their schedules for daylight savings in countries where they fly to as appropriate

It is quite common for airlines to have different scheduled times based on time of year
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Old Oct 27, 19, 1:39 am
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Don't forget that the US don't change their clocks on the same weekend so they tend to have a week at the winter change where all the flights arrive one hour earlier I think.
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Old Oct 27, 19, 2:11 am
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Originally Posted by alex67500 View Post
Don't forget that the US don't change their clocks on the same weekend so they tend to have a week at the winter change where all the flights arrive one hour earlier I think.
Can be even more noticeable for travel between northern and southern hemispheres where clocks go forward in the south whilst going back in the north, creating a 2 hour variance between summer and winter
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Old Oct 27, 19, 2:13 am
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In many internal systems UTC time is used(marked with a Z). UTC doesn’t change for daylight saving. That translates to the local time as displayed to customers.
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Old Oct 27, 19, 2:26 am
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Originally Posted by Mks6 View Post
Sorry if this is a silly question. It's early and I'm curious.

Ta!

Operations can rock happily along using UTC/GMT/Zulu hours, with local clock time as an overlay. Where its essential to maintain local schedule integrity there clearly have to be be some operational adjustments.

Just imagine what it was like in the days of printed timetables - particularly as the dates of clock adjustments are not always geographically synchronised.
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Old Oct 27, 19, 2:27 am
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Today is the first day of the IATA winter schedule season, so there is a complete revision of the whole BA schedule in any case versus summer. In other words, this week looks very different to last week.

Im addition there may be a few temporary anomalies where clocks have changed in UK but not yet in other time zones as mentioned above.
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Old Oct 27, 19, 3:27 am
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Few years ago I flew back from the US during the week where the time difference was 4 not 5 hours and the flight was still scheduled to arrive at LHR at its usual time and they adjusted the departure time at the origin airport to cover it.

But I guess it’s not always possible to do that.

And yes as these dates are known about a long time in advance (unless you’re I think Morocco and you change your mind at the last minute) the airlines adjust their schedules for it.
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Old Oct 27, 19, 4:00 am
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Originally Posted by Mks6 View Post
Morning,

Currently sitting at home in Windsor and I noticed more planes than normal before 6am
They put their clocks forward instead of back ?!?
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Old Oct 27, 19, 4:15 am
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Originally Posted by UKtravelbear View Post
Few years ago I flew back from the US during the week where the time difference was 4 not 5 hours and the flight was still scheduled to arrive at LHR at its usual time and they adjusted the departure time at the origin airport to cover it.
Which for airports with curfews or busy slots can be needed.
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Old Oct 27, 19, 4:49 am
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Originally Posted by Ldnn1 View Post
Today is the first day of the IATA winter schedule season, so there is a complete revision of the whole BA schedule in any case versus summer. In other words, this week looks very different to last week.

Im addition there may be a few temporary anomalies where clocks have changed in UK but not yet in other time zones as mentioned above.
Exactly - clock time change coincides with the changes of winter and summer schedules, so it is really an entirely new set of operations that get put in place.

Incidentally, if, as promised, we stop changing time for the winter, I do wonder if the winter and summer season will keep happening on the same dates or change somehow. US airlines have long had more "seasons" of flights for instance, and I have often wondered if the 7 months - 5 months model is ideal for airlines.
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Old Oct 27, 19, 6:29 am
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Originally Posted by Dave Noble View Post
Can be even more noticeable for travel between northern and southern hemispheres where clocks go forward in the south whilst going back in the north, creating a 2 hour variance between summer and winter
Given that jetlag would be the main noticeable factor for longhaul journeys, this "2 hour variance" in expected time would only be observable for travellers moving within the same timezone, or one timezone difference either way.

And given that there are only 4 "major" countries in the Southern Hemisphere that use DST (Chile, Paraguay, parts of Australia, New Zealand) I don't think this "2 hour variance" is much of an issue for North-South (or vice versa) travellers; jetlag and tiredness from travel is going to be the dominant factor.
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Old Oct 27, 19, 8:49 am
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Originally Posted by irishguy28 View Post
Given that jetlag would be the main noticeable factor for longhaul journeys, this "2 hour variance" in expected time would only be observable for travellers moving within the same timezone, or one timezone difference either way.

And given that there are only 4 "major" countries in the Southern Hemisphere that use DST (Chile, Paraguay, parts of Australia, New Zealand) I don't think this "2 hour variance" is much of an issue for North-South (or vice versa) travellers; jetlag and tiredness from travel is going to be the dominant factor.
That is beside the point - which is that for flights between e.g. Australia and the USA, to maintain the same arrival or departure time at one end (which may be necessary because of slots or curfews), the arrival or departure time at the other end has to be moved by 2 hours, or the scheduled flight time has to be lengthened or shortened by 2 hours, or a mixture. This can lead to other problems which all have to be worked out by the airline schedulers.

Since airlines don't really publish full timetables any more, and airports / ATC don't generally publicly release information about how they organise flight movements, a layperson has to compile their own timetables and study them carefully in order to gain the understanding needed to answer the OP.
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Old Oct 27, 19, 10:08 am
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Originally Posted by irishguy28 View Post
Given that jetlag would be the main noticeable factor for longhaul journeys, this "2 hour variance" in expected time would only be observable for travellers moving within the same timezone, or one timezone difference either way.

And given that there are only 4 "major" countries in the Southern Hemisphere that use DST (Chile, Paraguay, parts of Australia, New Zealand) I don't think this "2 hour variance" is much of an issue for North-South (or vice versa) travellers; jetlag and tiredness from travel is going to be the dominant factor.
Until now, this factor has created significant wobble with BA's somewhat awkward afternoon departure time out of GRU (given that it's always timed to arrive at the same hour). Now that Brazil has abandoned daylight savings time, the seasonal variance is down to one hour.
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Old Oct 27, 19, 3:03 pm
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Originally Posted by irishguy28 View Post
Given that jetlag would be the main noticeable factor for longhaul journeys, this "2 hour variance" in expected time would only be observable for travellers moving within the same timezone, or one timezone difference either way.

And given that there are only 4 "major" countries in the Southern Hemisphere that use DST (Chile, Paraguay, parts of Australia, New Zealand) I don't think this "2 hour variance" is much of an issue for North-South (or vice versa) travellers; jetlag and tiredness from travel is going to be the dominant factor.
What has jetlag got to do with it? Flight schedules are impacted by the 2 hour variance between summer and winter. For example
BA16 21/10 scheduled to depart Sydney at 15:50 and arrive in Singapore at 21:05 ; depart at 22:35 and arrive into London at 05:05
BA16 28/10 is scheduled to depart Sydney at 16:30 and arrive in Singapore at 21:30 ; depart at 22:55 and arrive into London at 04:55

Even the 1 hour time difference between last week and this leads to a later departure out of Sydney by 40 mins and a 10 min earlier arrival time. I suspect that the start of DST in Australia earlier in month also had some impact

The airlines know when DST starts and ends in the different countries and plans schedules accordingly
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