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BA835 - 14/06 - Hard Landing then Go Around

BA835 - 14/06 - Hard Landing then Go Around

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Old Jun 15, 19, 3:13 am
  #46  
 
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Originally Posted by eugegall View Post
Hi all,

Had a bit of a funny experience today and wondered how common this is?

Very bumpy approach into Heathrow today, seemed faster than usual on final and with an almighty bang we touched down but then took off again. I know go arounds are more than standard but how often are go arounds happening after touching the tarmac?

Then oddly enough the captain came on the PA to say that both it was windy but the go around was caused by a plane on the runway.

I have a light pilots licence and if that was the case the controller would have asked for a go around way before touching the runway. Maybe he was just embarrassed to admit that he couldn't quite handle the aircraft during those particular challenging conditions. it just seemed very contradictory.

All in all they did a great job and I'm sure we were very safe at all times so congrats for landing in those conditions. Was very gusty indeed.
Go arounds in Gibraltar donít get anywhere near the runway..
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Old Jun 15, 19, 3:31 am
  #47  
 
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Originally Posted by eugegall View Post
Sorry to ask again but any idea how roughly a go around happens after they have physically touched down?
The answer is almost never. Part of the landing checks for modern aircraft is to arm the auto spoiler. The spoilers will then activate when the aircraft senses touchdown through either a weight on wheels switch or for some widebodies a tilt switch on the undercarriage. It would be dangerous to attempt a go around after the spoilers have activated. For this reason on base training flights auto spoilers are not activated for touch and goes.

A low level go around may result in contact with the runway, due to the time required for big engines to spool up to go around thrust, combined with the downward momentum of the aircraft. Pushing the toga (take of /go arround ) buttons on the thrust levers disarms the auto spoiler whilst airborn.
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Old Jun 15, 19, 4:43 am
  #48  
 
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Originally Posted by Raymoland View Post
As many as you have fuel for. I would imagine after two tries most would head to your alternate.
I can remember landing on a 4th attempt into Riyadh!
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Old Jun 15, 19, 5:00 am
  #49  
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Only one go-around for me ... F-27 into SOU on a rather turbulent day, on short final when a light a/c entered the runway without clearance. Quick blast of power, and bumped around the pattern to have another go. Bloody puddle-jumpers!
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Old Jun 15, 19, 5:12 am
  #50  
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Originally Posted by Sheikh Yerbooty View Post
... my respect for London ATC is unsurpassed - they are, quite literally, the undisputed world champions of calmly and efficiently shifting enormous amounts of traffic in a hugely congested area, to and from equally congested airports.
Indeed, 100% agreed. They really are true asset to aviation.
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Old Jun 15, 19, 9:22 am
  #51  
 
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Originally Posted by PETER01 View Post

OAO (Over and Out, I just made that one up )


You can never have an over and out! Over means I have stated my message and await a response. Out means I have finished my communication and so not require a response!
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Old Jun 15, 19, 9:24 am
  #52  
 
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Originally Posted by BA6501 View Post
What is the maximum number of 'tries' possible? I thought that after two go arounds, pilots normally go to the diversion airport (to avoid trying to land the plane at all costs in 'frustration' on the third try)... Sure I read that on here once!
No clue, there was no need to divert, weather was totally fine.
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Old Jun 15, 19, 9:44 am
  #53  
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Not sure what time this was, but late evening yesterday, as I had a long layover while getting over to the HGI (after getting out from Hatton Cross station), there were a couple of planes coming in, and one of them was the Finnair flight from HEL. This AY flight was about to land (just before the BP petrol station), it had to an aborted landing, first time seeing this from the ground (I've experienced more than a couple of times an aborted landing).

Not sure if this was due to weather or aircraft on runway, as the Air Canada flight behind it just landed as normal.

Cheers!
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Old Jun 15, 19, 10:04 am
  #54  
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Originally Posted by KARFA View Post


on my one they did the opposite on the second attempt - banged it in right at the start of the TDZ! They weren’t going long again

all my go arounds have been followed by a successful second attempt so far!
I had one brief touchdown followed by a dramatic power up and then landing at another airport about a hundred miles away. If was a flight that had already been delayed by summer thunderstorms and the story was that the first airport lost all electrical power just as we were touching down. It was an exciting flight for geeks, but I never felt unsafe.

IANAP (I am not a pilot) but I've been told that pilots are trained from the beginning that if they suspect a problem, they get the aircraft back up in the air instantly and do a go around and landing once the situation has been clarified to be safe.
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Old Jun 15, 19, 10:14 am
  #55  
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Originally Posted by MSPeconomist View Post

IANAP (I am not a pilot) but I've been told that pilots are trained from the beginning that if they suspect a problem, they get the aircraft back up in the air instantly and do a go around and landing once the situation has been clarified to be safe.
100%, though preferably prior to touching down.
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Old Jun 15, 19, 10:16 am
  #56  
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Originally Posted by nldogbert View Post
Not sure if this was due to weather or aircraft on runway, as the Air Canada flight behind it just landed as normal.

Cheers!
While most common there are other factors, such as an unstable approach (not necessarily due to wind, the pilot could've just c*cked it up), emergency equipment needing to cross the runway and taking precedence in the case of an incident (brake fire at JFK recently caused this kind of go around), warning indications in the cockpit, etc.
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Old Jun 15, 19, 10:18 am
  #57  
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Originally Posted by MSPeconomist View Post
IANAP (I am not a pilot) but I've been told that pilots are trained from the beginning that if they suspect a problem, they get the aircraft back up in the air instantly and do a go around and landing once the situation has been clarified to be safe.
True, but then I think there are also some problems which would be better dealt with if you continued the landing such as a cargo/engine fire indication.
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Old Jun 15, 19, 10:19 am
  #58  
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Originally Posted by EDIwanderer View Post


You can never have an over and out! Over means I have stated my message and await a response. Out means I have finished my communication and so not require a response!
Over = Over to you
Out = I'm outta here
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Old Jun 15, 19, 10:22 am
  #59  
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Actually, unless there are identified comms difficulties, no ATCO would use ‘over’ or indeed ‘out’ ... except in the latter case to shut someone up!
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Old Jun 15, 19, 11:47 am
  #60  
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Originally Posted by T8191 View Post
Actually, unless there are identified comms difficulties, no ATCO would use ‘over’ or indeed ‘out’ ... except in the latter case to shut someone up!
True that. I have heard "out" said by a known narky ATCO. It wasn't said to me but it kind of made me laugh. Your comment reminded me...

The only other times I distinctly remember hearing "out" in the aviation context from the 'proper' end is at the end of ATIS*.

I did say "out" once when I had to unplug the headsets for safety reason and there were no speakers so I couldn't have heard them, just to make it clear, after I told them what was happening.

However, when it comes to marine radio transmissions, I hear it all the time, and sometimes even use "over". Much less disciplined or congested in the marine context though! The last time I used it was a few weeks ago when the a certain navy (non-EU/non-Commonwealth) decided that they wanted to congregate in the area and started giving a number of annoying civilian boats instructions to get us out of the area. They told us "180" but didn't say 180 what - did they mean "turn 180" or "heading 180" which we had to clarify (they meant heading, as it turns out).

*This is not for T8191 but for those who aren't familiar, ATIS = Automatic Terminal Information Service, basically it's mostly the aviation weather stuff

Going back to the subject of going around with the wheels having touched the ground, I can't even remember where it was or which airline it was, but I had one instance this year, because of preceding traffic being slow to vacate. I went through a phase of flying into fog-prone airports with just Cat I and had so many go-arounds that they stopped registering in my mind.

Last edited by LTN Phobia; Jun 15, 19 at 12:40 pm
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