“On time” departure

Old Jun 6, 2019, 7:34 am
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“On time” departure

BA730 LHR GVA departed at 1354 today, one minute earlier than scheduled and as such is showing as “departed early” on the BA app.
The BA734 to GVA is scheduled to depart at 1515 but is already showing a new ETD at 1525, but shows “on time” on the BA app.
Really? Irritating.

Last edited by Yeoman5; Jun 6, 2019 at 7:36 am Reason: Correction
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Old Jun 6, 2019, 8:05 am
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You must be fairly easily irritated

A buffer is applied for departure times. Anything within that buffer shows as 'on time' as there's a good chance it will arrive on time.
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Old Jun 6, 2019, 8:20 am
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I believe that "On time" is defined as being up to 15 minutes later than the scheduled departure time.
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Old Jun 6, 2019, 8:22 am
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Well the app is showing the 734 as departing at 15.19 so all good then!
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Old Jun 6, 2019, 9:57 am
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I'm with you on the 'mildly irritating' front.... It's the 1 minute early TRUMPETING as EARLY that annoys me... if there's +15 mins of on time, then up to 15 mins early should be on time too!
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Old Jun 6, 2019, 10:17 am
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Originally Posted by UKtravelbear
Well the app is showing the 734 as departing at 15.19 so all good then!
and the driver got us here just a minute late. Almost like a Swiss clock...
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Old Jun 6, 2019, 10:19 am
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I've always wondered what counts as "departure time"? Doors closed, "Ready" to ATC, Push-back, Engine start, Take-off, or something in between? My last departure from LGW there was a good 40 minutes between doors closed and take off.
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Old Jun 6, 2019, 10:32 am
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Push-back, basically.

From memory, I think that the time that is communicated via ACARS is parking brake off. So if the aircraft is ready, the tug is connected, and the parking brake is off but the aircraft has to wait before actually pushing because of (eg) movements behind it, then the actual departure time may be recorded as slightly earlier than actual push-back.

Interestingly, ISTR from previous discussions that for the purposes of the ANO, a "flight" only begins when the aircraft begins to move under its own power. So presumably that would exclude push-back and engine start (and any tow to a remote engine start position), and the "flight" only commences when the aircraft taxies by itself. But that is of course for different purposes from "departure time".
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Old Jun 6, 2019, 10:37 am
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Another pet peeve of mine is where we're told "Today's flight is exceptionally full" which, to me at least, is nonsense. The flight is either full or it isn't. It can't be "exceptionally" full.
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Old Jun 6, 2019, 10:46 am
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Originally Posted by catandmouse
I've always wondered what counts as "departure time"? Doors closed, "Ready" to ATC, Push-back, Engine start, Take-off, or something in between? My last departure from LGW there was a good 40 minutes between doors closed and take off.
Whatever is more convenient for the airline. If you miss conformance they'll tell you the departure time is wheels in the air (yes, this really happened to me, albeit on BE, not BA).
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Old Jun 6, 2019, 10:48 am
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Originally Posted by Geordie405
Another pet peeve of mine is where we're told "Today's flight is exceptionally full" which, to me at least, is nonsense. The flight is either full or it isn't. It can't be "exceptionally" full.
I know what you mean. What irritates me is the adoption of the American Airlines patter of saying " We will be arriving into London Heathrow (or wherever)" In English you arrive at somewhere not into. The preposition into generally means movement toward the inside of something.
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Old Jun 6, 2019, 11:27 am
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Published time of departure is push back time. At BA doors are to be closed 5mins prior to this time. Time to taxi is absorbed into the scheduled ‘flight time’.

I was told on a visit to EDI Tower that the official departure time for CAA statistics on punctuality, comes from the time ATC give approval for Push & Start.
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Old Jun 6, 2019, 11:44 am
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Originally Posted by PUCCI GALORE
I know what you mean. What irritates me is the adoption of the American Airlines patter of saying " We will be arriving into London Heathrow (or wherever)" In English you arrive at somewhere not into. The preposition into generally means movement toward the inside of something.
Well, for that matter what about "I'm flying out of Terminal 5"?

I don't understand the modern allergy to the perfectly good word "from".
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Old Jun 6, 2019, 12:48 pm
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Originally Posted by Geordie405
Another pet peeve of mine is where we're told "Today's flight is exceptionally full" which, to me at least, is nonsense. The flight is either full or it isn't. It can't be "exceptionally" full.
Absolutely. And its cousin phrases “very full” or “completely full”.

Glad I’m not the only one who has a bug bear at adverbs bring inappropriately prefixed to binary states. See also: “really unique” and “very pregnant”.
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Old Jun 6, 2019, 1:18 pm
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Originally Posted by PUCCI GALORE
I know what you mean. What irritates me is the adoption of the American Airlines patter of saying " We will be arriving into London Heathrow (or wherever)" In English you arrive at somewhere not into. The preposition into generally means movement toward the inside of something.
umm that’s the normal usage. As you may recall, the US has far more people than England and thus standard English is American English.
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