A genuine question for rude BA passengers

Old May 24, 19, 5:51 am
  #1  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 356
A genuine question for rude BA passengers

Having witnessed yet another rude passenger on the Rio to Heathrow flight, I wonder whether crews or fellow passengers can start asking these individuals whether they are on medication. It's uncomfortable to watch unreasonable adult behaviours which this time involved a lady loudly demanding that the captain came to speak to her about the lack of choice in starters and desserts. It later turned into demands that her friend in Y should be given the spare CW seat next to her. Should crews be able to discreetly ask someone whether the person is on medication? Would crews add a note to the passenger records to reflect possible mental health issues and erratic behaviours rather than just "rude" or "unruly"?
kaizenflying is offline  
Old May 24, 19, 5:57 am
  #2  
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Ipswich
Posts: 7,541
Um. No. Many regular prescriptions are for fairly mundane things unconnected to mental health, and unlikely to cause behavioural issues as a side effect. The only way to use this as an excuse would be to start digging into what kind of medication, and for what. That could never be a good thing.
Redhead, IAMORGAN, origin and 8 others like this.
windowontheAside is offline  
Old May 24, 19, 5:59 am
  #3  
 
Join Date: May 2017
Programs: Skywards, QF FF
Posts: 41
What a strange assumption. I am on plenty of medication, and none of it makes me rude or unruly. Nor do mental health issues make me rude and unruly.
Perhaps a note in the system that someone is a total plonker, but if a member of the crew asked me if I were on medication Id be shocked. If a fellow passenger asked me, Id be inclined to reply that it was none of their business.
petit_manchot is offline  
Old May 24, 19, 6:01 am
  #4  
FlyerTalk Evangelist
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: London
Programs: Mucci. Nothing else matters.
Posts: 37,206
Originally Posted by kaizenflying View Post
It's uncomfortable to watch unreasonable adult behaviours which this time involved a lady loudly demanding that the captain came to speak to her about the lack of choice in starters and desserts. It later turned into demands that her friend in Y should be given the spare CW seat next to her.
I didn't see the incident myself, but from the description I would ask why either of these demands would necessarily suggest mental illness? They seem to be entirely consistent with a common theme in reports of poor behaviour: people who think that they are special and specially entitled.

Frequently - perhaps usually - it is nothing more than an inability to understand that whatever cabin you're flying in, in reality you're almost certainly merely an unimportant number to BA, to be processed and carried along with thousands of indistinguishable others.

So many people can't cope with that, and deal very badly with it when they are reminded of it, but that is a long way from true mental illness (and it would be unfortunate and perhaps dangerous to trivialise mental illness in this way).
Andriyko, Gerbs, wrp96 and 8 others like this.
Globaliser is offline  
Old May 24, 19, 6:03 am
  #5  
Moderator: British Airways Executive Club
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Programs: Battleaxe Alliance
Posts: 22,026
I can see where you are coming from, in that when someone is behaving weirdly, it does make you wonder if it's caused by something, be it medication or alcohol or whatever*, or whether the person is just plain rude and weird.
However, I don't think asking that question to a rude person would get anywhere.

*Rather than the implication that they have an underlying medical conditions such as a mental illness, the question here is, did they take something that might have affected their normal inhibition, e.g. anxiolytic, sleeping tablets, alcohol, or both etc.
origin, flygirl68 and nancypants like this.
LTN Phobia is offline  
Old May 24, 19, 6:09 am
  #6  
A FlyerTalk Posting Legend
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Minneapolis: DL DM charter 2.3MM
Programs: A3*Gold, SPG Plat, HyattDiamond, MarriottPP, LHW exAccess, ICI, Raffles Amb, NW PE MM, TWA Gold MM
Posts: 92,716
Many countries have regulations to the effect that someone's medical records are private and confidential. It's none of your business.
david55, Gino Troian and ermis177 like this.
MSPeconomist is offline  
Old May 24, 19, 6:16 am
  #7  
FlyerTalk Evangelist
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Programs: Mucci des Hommes Magiques et Magnifiques
Posts: 16,245
The way I handle rude customers is to listen and then give short answers, like no that is not possible and then just repeat the answer after each let off of steam, the more you go into reasons the more that fuels the fire.
You have to remain calm and polite and they soon realise that they are not going to get what they want.
Can I help you is offline  
Old May 24, 19, 6:21 am
  #8  
 
Join Date: Feb 2019
Location: UK. West Sussex
Programs: BAEC. Silver.
Posts: 310
Just sounds like a really rude person
a case if DYKWIA....
nothing to do with any illness, just bad manners

"The captain is a little busy flying the plane at the moment, to serve you an alternative meal"

"Unfortunatly, it is not possible for your friend to move up to Business class or first"
"But should you wish. You can move back to economy and sit with them"
"you will also be able to enjoy a different style of meal, which may be more to your liking"
​​​​​
Fatdickie is offline  
Old May 24, 19, 6:21 am
  #9  
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Programs: BA Silver, Virgin Gold
Posts: 132
Originally Posted by kaizenflying View Post
Having witnessed yet another rude passenger on the Rio to Heathrow flight, I wonder whether crews or fellow passengers can start asking these individuals whether they are on medication. It's uncomfortable to watch unreasonable adult behaviours which this time involved a lady loudly demanding that the captain came to speak to her about the lack of choice in starters and desserts. It later turned into demands that her friend in Y should be given the spare CW seat next to her. Should crews be able to discreetly ask someone whether the person is on medication? Would crews add a note to the passenger records to reflect possible mental health issues and erratic behaviours rather than just "rude" or "unruly"?
Was the tone used rude?

I dont see the requests as rude but more unusual
London21 is offline  
Old May 24, 19, 6:24 am
  #10  
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: London
Programs: US Gold
Posts: 615
Isn't the most likely medication in this scenario alcohol?

wg
nancypants likes this.
wendyg is offline  
Old May 24, 19, 6:27 am
  #11  
Senior Mod and Moderator: Aegean Miles&Bonus and British Airways
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Norwich, UK
Programs: A3*G, BA Gold, BD Gold (in memoriam), IHG Spire Ambassador
Posts: 6,989
Originally Posted by Can I help you View Post
The way I handle rude customers is to listen and then give short answers, like no that is not possible and then just repeat the answer after each let off of steam, the more you go into reasons the more that fuels the fire.
You have to remain calm and polite and they soon realise that they are not going to get what they want.
I tend to find that the nicer you are to people, including Cabin Crew, the more they are likely to help you in return ...

Travelling in Y to and from PIT last week I was royally looked after by the crew, for which I was extremely grateful - in fact I specifically asked to see the CSM to make sure he thanked them on my behalf during the Mixed Fleet de-brief, and from his reaction that's not something that happened very often. All that brought was more leftover goodies from CW and another glass of champagne, although by the time I was served afternoon tea with a tablecloth (albeit at 2am UK time) the people sitting in the aisle opposite must have wondered what on earth was going on!
Shingi, Gerbs, LTN Phobia and 8 others like this.
NWIFlyer is offline  
Old May 24, 19, 6:27 am
  #12  
FlyerTalk Evangelist
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Berlin, SW Florida, and Toronto
Programs: UA 1K, Hilton Diamond, Discovery Black, and assorted others
Posts: 29,605
I suspect the OP was trying to be humorous.
LondonElite is offline  
Old May 24, 19, 6:31 am
  #13  
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Ipswich
Posts: 7,541
I've just realised the title is "A genuine question for rude BA passengers" (rather than about)

Since I answered, does that mean I've outed myself?
origin likes this.
windowontheAside is offline  
Old May 24, 19, 6:32 am
  #14  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 356
Originally Posted by MSPeconomist View Post
Many countries have regulations to the effect that someone's medical records are private and confidential. It's none of your business.
There's no suggestion that access to medical records is granted. More that crews are alert to the signs of mental health. It's common practice and often referred to as a duty of care in many UK organisations now. Professionals would probably argue that rudeness is linked to the mind functions and emotions being distorted (for whatever reason, including as a result of alcohol, frustration) but that's maybe not for this forum. I certainly looked at the individual on my flight as being irrational in that moment (with possibly low emotional intelligence) but in an empathetic way, hence the question.
kaizenflying is offline  
Old May 24, 19, 6:34 am
  #15  
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Programs: BA GGL, TK Elite
Posts: 2,795
Rude behaviour is usually not driven by medication, rather a mix of genetics and upbringing. If you’re dealing with a grown up rude person, it’s safe to assume they will have that personality trait for the rest of their life.

Which in itself is probably a reason to feel sorry for them, more than anything else...
lavajava likes this.
LCY8737 is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Search Engine: