No nuts please!

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Old Apr 10, 19, 10:00 am
  #136  
 
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Originally Posted by kipper View Post
Then don't serve it to the kids. Make sure you serve the kids first, keeping their meals isolated from those with pine nuts, and wash your hands in between handling the food with pine nuts and anything for the kids.

Ideally, allow for at least a few seats' worth of a buffer, so the kid doesn't accidentally ingest anything from that meal (for example, the person next to the kid drops a piece of the pesto, the kid touches it, then touches their glass, etc.).

Coming back from PRG last fall, I was on a DL flight and had notified them of my nut allergy in advance. When we arrived, we were asked about it, and I confirmed my nut allergy. Once we boarded, before takeoff, both an FA and the purser confirmed my nut allergy. When the FAs handed out the menus, I noticed that one of the meals included pesto. I asked the FA if it was possible to ensure one of whatever the other meal was available for me, given my allergy. The FA said she would make sure to accommodate me, and her solution was to serve me when serving all of the other special meals. It worked well, as it was a minor inconvenience for her and ensured I could eat on the flight. I really do wish airlines would give the option to pre-order a nut-free meal.
This, to me, seems the perfect answer to this entire thread.
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Old Apr 10, 19, 10:13 am
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Originally Posted by Yeoman5 View Post
May I ask that you do a little reading on this topic before posting such a response. It mayhelp you look less ignorant.
And why, if an allergy was such a lethal threat to someone's existence, would they risk their life and RELY on the compliance of 100+ other passengers? If it's legitimately such a threat to someone's existence - particularly a 2 year old - then why take that chance?

In many Asian countries, it's extremely common to wear masks when they have a cold so as not to spread the germs. I don't see why this is a big ask.
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Old Apr 10, 19, 10:33 am
  #138  
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Originally Posted by azmojo View Post
And why, if an allergy was such a lethal threat to someone's existence, would they risk their life and RELY on the compliance of 100+ other passengers? If it's legitimately such a threat to someone's existence - particularly a 2 year old - then why take that chance?

In many Asian countries, it's extremely common to wear masks when they have a cold so as not to spread the germs. I don't see why this is a big ask.
Good luck getting a 2-year-old to wear a mask and keep it on for more than a few minutes. Travel by other means is not always an option.
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Old Apr 10, 19, 4:16 pm
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Originally Posted by GCab View Post
I'm sorry but I am going to respond further to this despite my earlier post, because there is a tide of irrationality sweeping the world at the moment and looking at those sources I detect a common thread

All these links are from the "I can't believe this happened to me AND THEY WOULDN'T LISTEN [*optional* EVEN THOUGH I AM AN ACTUAL MOM]" school of populist, "the liberal globalist authorities/big business are out to get us" journalism (Sun/Mail/Fox/Mirror - seriously?), and seem to be more about the psychological reactions of those involved, than the actual biological ones.

I haven't yet trawled each one for details but a lot of it seems perceptual rather than objective, in the same mode as a lot of the of the anti-vaccine stuff out there ("this happened, and it might be related to X, but in any case I'm very very upset about it, and that's what counts").

The tone (if not the actual words) of most of those articles, read as if Brexit/Trump would be the solution of nut allergies, if only "They" would listen to Real People/Hard-working Families. Just saying.

No reflection on the many seriously anaphylactic people out there (including those cited in the articles), or those here who are related to them - my comment is mainly around the editorial colour around these articles. The links are mainly from trash press, and are not evidence. I admit though that I did ask for actual stories and you have provided these, so I apologise for moving the goalposts, and I do applaud and support you for pushing the "jeez, why not just do what it takes to help others" angle - really can't criticise that at all.

Happy to discuss anything more scientific for debate purposes - I just don't think these articles are that.
iíll help you out anyway
1) passengers within a few rows of affected served nuts
2) passengers within a few rows of affected served nuts
3) skin reaction from tray table ?contaminated with nut residue
4) duplicate of 3
5) passengers within a few rows of affected served nuts
6) hasnít even got on the plane yet but scared to because Cathay have said they will still serve nuts

the psychological angle definitely comes into this and I would suggest is probably more damaging than the actual risk
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Old Apr 10, 19, 4:26 pm
  #140  
 
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Originally Posted by kipper View Post
Good luck getting a 2-year-old to wear a mask and keep it on for more than a few minutes. Travel by other means is not always an option.
OK, so your 2 year old will die if exposed to peanuts, and you are going to entrust a plane full of people to not expose the kid to peanuts? If it's that risky, why are you even on a plane?
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Old Apr 10, 19, 5:05 pm
  #141  
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Originally Posted by azmojo View Post
If it's that risky, why are you even on a plane?
Really? Wow, you are a piece of work. So you're advocating that that up to 1.5 to 2% of the entire US population affected by nut allergies should just stop flying altogether then (that's about 5 million people or more) because someone on a plane cannot stop themselves from eating nuts on the flight? If people can fly without smoking on a plane, people can refrain from eating nuts on a plane.
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Old Apr 10, 19, 5:24 pm
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Originally Posted by TravelLawyer View Post
Really? Wow, you are a piece of work. So you're advocating that that up to 1.5 to 2% of the entire US population affected by nut allergies should just stop flying altogether then (that's about 5 million people or more) because someone on a plane cannot stop themselves from eating nuts on the flight? If people can fly without smoking on a plane, people can refrain from eating nuts on a plane.
That's not what I'm advocating. And besides, they can always fly private or on a no-nut airline.
I'm saying that if the threat is that real and legitimate, and knowing the general public is incapable of complying with such requests (you need look only at an airport security screening setup for an example of people not able to follow simple requests), and airline cleaning crews are not that good, etc., that considering all of that you are still willing to get on a plane - or bring a 2 year old with such condition - into a place where someone might consume peanuts despite all of the precautions, perhaps the threat really isn't that legitimate. Perhaps this is more about the attention and inconveniencing others. Otherwise if the threat was legitimate, simply asking people not to consume nuts on an airplane would not be sufficient to eliminate the lethal risk. If the danger was truly that grave, people would wear masks and take other precautions or avoid public flying altogether.

Last edited by azmojo; Apr 10, 19 at 5:37 pm
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Old Apr 10, 19, 5:33 pm
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Originally Posted by Coffeemadman View Post
Nobody dies NOT eating nuts.
People DO die eating nuts.

Simple.
Nobody dies NOT getting on a plane.

Originally Posted by GCab View Post
Social accommodation vs. responsibility is a perfectly valid concept, and unconstrained moral panic isn't always the answer.
This. Especially true for those who give airline no prior notice of allergy, insist no nuts/legumes be served or consumed on the flight, yet unable to produce an Epi-pen from their hand luggage.

Originally Posted by kipper View Post
Travel by other means is not always an option.
Hard for FlyerTalkers to imagine but many people survive never setting foot on a plane.
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Old Apr 10, 19, 5:43 pm
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When airlines accommodate pax requests for food restrictions on what others carry on, then they need to offer substitutes that accommodate the dietary restrictions of those who otherwise took personal responsibility for their needs. Itís only reasonable.

No, pretzels are not a substitute for nuts. What low carb, high protein, vegan options do you suggest the airlines stock?
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Old Apr 10, 19, 6:40 pm
  #145  
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Smile Nuts Allergies? Really?

The response of the public is hysterical, and this thread confirms it!

It has been REPEATEDLY demonstrated (and leading allergists from throughout the world such as OHSU in Portland, Oregon, the CDC, John's Hopkins in Maryland, London School of Medicine, etc.) that nut allergies are not airborne and must be ingested to create anaphylaxis, even in those with severe allergy to nuts or seafood. My son is moderately to severely allergic to seafood, mostly shellfish and has never had a reaction other than through ingestion. Admittedly, this specific case (my son) is anecdotal and I personally do not put much weight in anecdotal 'evidence' put forth by those who are paranoid of everything, e.g. the anti-vaccination crowd that has reincarnated the spread of measles and small pox through their ignorance and obstinacy.

Certainly nut and seafood allergies are indeed real and can definitely be life threatening. But spreading false information simply creates divisiveness and unwarranted paranoia. We have enough of that in our political systems to not need this sort of BS being propagated by businesses ignorant and/or unwilling to do their homework to understand the real situation. There is absolutely no reason for nuts not to be served on a flight. Those with nut allergies know who they are and SHOULD know how to manage it, i.e. they simply have to avoid ingesting the nut proteins that trigger the reaction. If that means they fell they need to wear a mask, that does not seem to be a major sacrifice as if they really believe they are threatened then they need to wear that mask EVERYWHERE, not just on an airplane!

All that said, while I truly love my peanuts I'm more than happy to forego them on a flight if it makes someone else more comfortable. Just don't be making it a big deal and trying to force their non-existent problem on everyone else. Travel safe, relax and be mindful or others idiosyncrasies and tolerant of their ignorance. It makes life easier.

P.S. Interestingly, most of what we think of as nuts really are not. E.G. cashews, hazelnuts, walnuts, pecans, etc. are (as someone else pointed out) actually fruits! But now we wax philosophical and begin to argue semantics!!
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Old Apr 10, 19, 6:59 pm
  #146  
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Originally Posted by Segments View Post


Nobody dies NOT getting on a plane.



This. Especially true for those who give airline no prior notice of allergy, insist no nuts/legumes be served or consumed on the flight, yet unable to produce an Epi-pen from their hand luggage.



Hard for FlyerTalkers to imagine but many people survive never setting foot on a plane.
You will find that BAís policy is not to take note of allergies on bookings but that you should inform cabin crew on boarding. This ensures that they receive the message. A note is not necessarily going to be picked up. It then puts the emphasis on the customer to inform the crew and therefore a dialogue can take place. I think this is sensible.

As for previous comments about the airline switching meals for the whole flight then I think this is not ever going to happen. But not serving peanuts is an easy and relatively straight forward step and will benefit a significant proportion of those with severe allergies.
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Old Apr 10, 19, 9:37 pm
  #147  
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Originally Posted by CEB View Post
P.S. Interestingly, most of what we think of as nuts really are not. E.G. cashews, hazelnuts, walnuts, pecans, etc. are (as someone else pointed out) actually fruits! But now we wax philosophical and begin to argue semantics!!
Semantics? ALL nuts are fruit by definition. Peanuts are an exception and are legumes.
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Old Apr 11, 19, 2:15 am
  #148  
 
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Originally Posted by azmojo View Post
And why, if an allergy was such a lethal threat to someone's existence, would they risk their life and RELY on the compliance of 100+ other passengers? If it's legitimately such a threat to someone's existence - particularly a 2 year old - then why take that chance?

In many Asian countries, it's extremely common to wear masks when they have a cold so as not to spread the germs. I don't see why this is a big ask.
How does wearing a mask prevent a nut allergy via direct skin contact with the protein that causes the anaphylaxis?

Nut allergies aren't a choice. Eating nuts is a choice!!
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Old Apr 11, 19, 2:40 am
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Originally Posted by babats View Post
Why criticise somebody who has taken an unselfish approach to a potential solution which doesn't impact other passengers?
Because their statement on wearing a surgical mask as a way of preventing potential problems illustrates ignorance of the issue.
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Old Apr 11, 19, 2:44 am
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Originally Posted by craigdthomas View Post


How does wearing a mask prevent a nut allergy via direct skin contact with the protein that causes the anaphylaxis?

Nut allergies aren't a choice. Eating nuts is a choice!!
Flying is a choice too.

I have no skin the game, I like nuts, can I fly without them, absolutely.

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