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B737 Max : CAA bans from UK airspace; Comair aircraft grounded

B737 Max : CAA bans from UK airspace; Comair aircraft grounded

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Old Mar 12, 19, 11:13 am
  #136  
 
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Originally Posted by antichef View Post
TK1997 IST-LGW turned around near Prague
Unlucky for them today was a MAX on both LGW services, which are usually operated by a B739.

TK1982 was allowed to leave this afternoon albeit with a three hour delay.
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Old Mar 12, 19, 11:16 am
  #137  
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So glad that FR24 provides dynamic information about the movement of individual flights.

Perhaps we might concentrate on the bigger issue?
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Old Mar 12, 19, 11:24 am
  #138  
 
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Originally Posted by MSPeconomist View Post
I thought the TK MAX aircraft were already in UK airspace, not just halfway there.
I would love to see the onboard shopping selection on the TK MAX plane
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Old Mar 12, 19, 11:31 am
  #139  
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Originally Posted by mastutio View Post
I would love to see the onboard shopping selection on the TK MAX plane
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Old Mar 12, 19, 11:32 am
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Belgium, France, Germany, Ireland and The Netherlands have closed their airspace to the MAX 8
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Old Mar 12, 19, 11:33 am
  #141  
 
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Originally Posted by 1010101 View Post
It will be interesting to see how long the FAA holds out.
Maybe they’re holding out for some legally binding assurances from Geoffrey Cox that the plane is safe.
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Old Mar 12, 19, 11:46 am
  #142  
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EASA just banned the 7M8 from the entire european airspace, now it just got real and I stand corrected. 7M8 is toast.
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Old Mar 12, 19, 11:47 am
  #143  
 
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There's now an EU-wide ban on all 737-8 and 737-9
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Old Mar 12, 19, 11:55 am
  #144  
 
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As it would seem Boeing are now unable to deliver any B73max to any carrier outside the USA, and they were relying on the revenue from the increased production to tide them over whilst B777 revenue declines before the B777/9, how is this cash flow problem going to affect Boeing?
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Old Mar 12, 19, 11:56 am
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I would hope that, contrary what I am sure many believe, that EASA and other respective bodies are not simply acting because there's a public outcry, and as such, there's most likely a significant issue behind this (beyond the two main points of course).

I agree with other posters who are writing off this aircraft line. I think the public damage is simply too great on this.
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Old Mar 12, 19, 11:59 am
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Originally Posted by rapidex View Post
As it would seem Boeing are now unable to deliver any B73max to any carrier outside the USA, and they were relying on the revenue from the increased production to tide them over whilst B777 revenue declines before the B777/9, how is this cash flow problem going to affect Boeing?
I don't think Boeing will be in any issues but of course the 737-line this is massive supporter of the dividend, and as such, a significant shareholder base is likely to sell as it may be affected (and potential lawsuits from several bodies=. That said, AFAIK they still produce the 737-800 and other lines, and as these are not affected, should be ok.

If any, it will speed up Boeing's clean sheet design (though main issue there is still engines and not the aircraft AFAIK).
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Old Mar 12, 19, 12:04 pm
  #147  
 
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Originally Posted by Irreverent Medusa View Post
There's now an EU-wide ban on all 737-8 and 737-9
MAX only or is that the way to designate a Max (with the normal ones being 737-800/900)?
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Old Mar 12, 19, 12:13 pm
  #148  
 
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Originally Posted by GGla View Post
MAX only or is that the way to designate a Max (with the normal ones being 737-800/900)?
It's from that highly technical source known as the Beeb so I'm going to say it probably just covers the Max
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Old Mar 12, 19, 12:20 pm
  #149  
 
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That Norwegian MAX that got stuck in Iran for 2 months (LN-BKE) must now be one of the least productive jets in aviation history!

Delivered to Norwegian on 30th October, stuck on the ground in Iran from December to February, rescued 3 weeks ago and then grounded today...
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Old Mar 12, 19, 12:23 pm
  #150  
 
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Originally Posted by dodgeflyer View Post
I would hope that, contrary what I am sure many believe, that EASA and other respective bodies are not simply acting because there's a public outcry, and as such, there's most likely a significant issue behind this (beyond the two main points of course).
I think they are working on the approach of "We are not sure if it is safe, so let us assume it's not," vs. "Until we know for sure it is unsafe, we'll assume it is." I see no problem with an abundance of caution until the root cause is discovered a proper risk analysis can be done.
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