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Not using outbound flight even if checked in?

Not using outbound flight even if checked in?

Old Jan 31, 19, 4:47 am
  #16  
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Maybe today's weather at LHR (including at least one BCN cancellation) and rebooking options will provide a get out of jail free card?
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Old Jan 31, 19, 8:30 am
  #17  
 
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Make your case to the airline why you believe it's in their best interest to grant your request. It's not likely to work, but if you can convince them, you're good to go.

There's your answer.
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Old Jan 31, 19, 9:00 am
  #18  
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I was going to suggest that if the flight is cancelled or badly delayed, that would be a reason to try to get a refund, but since the OP's friend has alrready flown on the Avios ticket, BA could argue that there was no intent to take the delayed/cancelled outbound flight.
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Old Jan 31, 19, 11:21 am
  #19  
 
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Originally Posted by Colin View Post
A BA agent certainly can, with trivial keystrokes, restore the return segment after it is auto-cancelled.
The issue is how to convince the agent to do so.

After it auto-cancels, send BA a DM via Twitter vaguely saying you canít see your flight home in Manage My Booking, ask if it is related to changing my outbound, attach your flown boarding pass to the tweet, and close with ďjust want to make sure iím ready to fly on Sunday.Ē
What you have said is a load of rubbish quite honestly. The agent isnt just pushing a button to reverse the change they are having to actually rebook from current availability. This means if there is no longer availability or the same booking class isnt available good luck getting it reinstated. Not to mention the fact that the agent would see the the status on the ticket as unflown and could check for the other flight you took if it was BA. Pretty sure they will want to see the full boarding pass too which has ticket number and pnr on.
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Old Jan 31, 19, 11:43 am
  #20  
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Originally Posted by SKT-DK View Post
I have always wondered why it is that people cannot just accept the terms and conditions of the ticket they bought (and accepted when doing the transaction).
Could it be because airlines use their disproportionate market power to impose on passengers unfair terms and conditions? I would not want to engage in the shady practices that colin recommends but it seems to me that there is a serious argument to be run that the automatic cancellation of a return flight when the outbound is not flown constitutes an unfair contract term, which may be invalid under the Consumers Rights Act 2015.
If a company like BA or any other did the same to you, you would no doubt be raging on about it on forums like this and complaining to BA like there was no tomorrow...
Well, let me know next time that you approach BA and they agree to modify their terms and conditions to offer you a bespoke transportation contract. You are comparing apples and oranges. Consumers have no choice but to accept the terms unilaterally imposed on them by airlines. If those terms are unfair, it is entirely appropriate to question them.
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Old Jan 31, 19, 11:59 am
  #21  
 
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Wasn't there a recent ruling in Spain saying that an airline can't cancel the rest of a booking if the passenger doesn't take the first flight? Does this ruling also cover UK-Spain-UK bookings?
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Old Jan 31, 19, 12:06 pm
  #22  
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Originally Posted by woobl View Post
I think I know the answer to this, but since this has been in the news recently wanted clarification!

My partner is booked on a BA flight tomorrow LHR - BCN, returning on Sunday. She decided to come out to BCN early so I booked her a reward tickets on Avios travelling this afternoon as the change fee was quite expensive. As such, she wouldn't use the outbound tomorrow. I'm pretty sure that means the return would be automatically cancelled, but can this be clarified?

Thanks!
You may have struck lucky as there is at least one BCN flight cancelled tomorrow. Calling up may be advantageous as would free a seat for another potential traveller moved from the cancelled flight.
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Old Jan 31, 19, 7:15 pm
  #23  
 
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Originally Posted by NickB View Post
Well, let me know next time that you approach BA and they agree to modify their terms and conditions to offer you a bespoke transportation contract. You are comparing apples and oranges. Consumers have no choice but to accept the terms unilaterally imposed on them by airlines. If those terms are unfair, it is entirely appropriate to question them.
And why exactly is that comparing apples and oranges? - if you want flexibility to avoid this situation by being able to move the outbound flight, you buy a flexible fare. If you do not, you buy a cheaper, in- or semi-flexible fare like in the OP's case. I fail to see why you are treated unfairly when the airline enforce the rules to which you agreed upon purchase.
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Old Feb 1, 19, 2:19 am
  #24  
 
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Originally Posted by SKT-DK View Post
I have always wondered why it is that people cannot just accept the terms and conditions of the ticket they bought (and accepted when doing the transaction).
If a company like BA or any other did the same to you, you would no doubt be raging on about it on forums like this and complaining to BA like there was no tomorrow...
Ethical behaviour is influenced by the ethics of the other party. You know, like not making customers aware of their EU261 rights and frustrating payment of claims, delaying refunds....

Hope that helps answer your question.
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Old Feb 1, 19, 2:36 am
  #25  
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Glad this has lead to an interesting discussion. In the end, she called BA and they cancelled the outbound, keeping the inbound intact and flew on the avios booking.

Thanks again for all the information.
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Old Feb 1, 19, 11:39 am
  #26  
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Originally Posted by SKT-DK View Post
And why exactly is that comparing apples and oranges?
because your comparison assumes that the airline and the consumer are on an equal footing. They are not. Let us say that you do not like clause X in the contract of transportation. So, what happens if you want to negotiate a change to it? Well, nothing happens because you simply can't. If you try to phone BA and argue that you want to buy a ticket to Paris, but you would want to slightly change clause 3c2) of your contract of carriage with BA, the agent won't laugh at you or put the phone down because they have been trained to be polite but they will tell you that it is not possible and they will undoubtedly think that you are a complete nutter because the very notion that a consumer might want to change the terms of a contract of carriage with an airline is utterly ridiculous. By contrast, if BA is unhappy with clause X in the contract of carriage, well they will just go ahead and change it and if you don't like the change, well tough: you will have no choice if you want to buy a ticket from the airline.
There is simply no equality between consumers and airlines: the power is one side and the other side has to accept more or less what the other side dictates and that is that.

I fail to see why you are treated unfairly when the airline enforce the rules to which you agreed upon purchase.
That was more or less how we understood "freedom of contract" in the 19th century, with the abuses that it led to, particularly in the field of employment.
Nowadays, that vision of things is universally rejected throughout European legal systems (and, dare I say, any civilised legal system), which all see a point for protective legislation such as consumer protection legislation to partially redress imbalances of power detrimental to the weaker party in certain types of contracts. Now, one can discuss how far it should reach, which clauses should be regarded as fair or unfair, but I do not think that there is much disagreement on the notion that one cannot, in consumer transactions, regard a clause as automatically fair merely it is in a contract that the consumer has agreed to. If you look at the consumer rights act 2015, for instance, or the law of other EU jurisdictions, a clause will normally be regarded as unfair and unenforceable in consumer contracts if it is causes a significant imbalance in the rights and obligations of the parties to the detriment of the consumer. Whether that is the case here can be debated but there is at least an arguable case.
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Old Feb 1, 19, 12:01 pm
  #27  
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Originally Posted by woobl View Post
Glad this has lead to an interesting discussion.
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Old Feb 2, 19, 2:24 am
  #28  
 
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Originally Posted by SKT-DK View Post
I have always wondered why it is that people cannot just accept the terms and conditions of the ticket they bought (and accepted when doing the transaction).
If a company like BA or any other did the same to you, you would no doubt be raging on about it on forums like this and complaining to BA like there was no tomorrow...
happy the OP knew the advice to ponder and that to be discarded
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