‘Supersonic’ on a 747 - 20th Jan

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Old Jan 21, 19, 9:13 am
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‘Supersonic’ on a 747 - 20th Jan

Thought I'd share this experience flying back from LAS yesterday - Matching the speed of sound with a 230 mph+ tailwind.

While I can't complain about a 9 hour journey back, I do question the decision to fly through such a volatile jet stream. It was certainly some of the worst prolonged turbulence experience I've had on a flight....

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Old Jan 21, 19, 9:22 am
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I am sure you are aware that you were not going supersonic (just going fast over the ground).

Planes don't fall out of the sky due to turbulence (except maybe for a certain French Carrier). Quite a few people seem to get concerned with bumps but it's really nothing to get bothered about - if it does concern you then there are courses available to address or you can always take the train or go by sea!
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Old Jan 21, 19, 9:29 am
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It wasn't going supersonic... interesting read from a while back:

Boeing 777 to replace Concorde?
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Old Jan 21, 19, 9:30 am
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Originally Posted by moral_low_ground View Post
I am sure you are aware that you were not going supersonic (just going fast over the ground).

Planes don't fall out of the sky due to turbulence (except maybe for a certain French Carrier). Quite a few people seem to get concerned with bumps but it's really nothing to get bothered about - if it does concern you then there are courses available to address or you can always take the train or go by sea!

Of course - I know its just groundspeed, but still quite impressive!

Ref turbulence. Absolutely know that its not dangerous, I just question the decision on BA routes to fly that particular north atlantic route given the passenger comfort issue.
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Old Jan 21, 19, 9:33 am
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speaking for myself the bumpier the better unless I'm trying to sleep, it takes the boredom out of flying. I've even had a drink hit the overhead bins with the resulting soaking on a flight back from Jersey C.I.
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Old Jan 21, 19, 9:36 am
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Originally Posted by Chris1988 View Post
I just question the decision on BA routes to fly that particular north atlantic route given the passenger comfort issue.
It would have taken quite a long and costly routing to avoid the wind over the US and the Atlantic, If the turbulence wasn't dangerous I personally wouldn't want the airline to fly around the houses to avoid it.

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Old Jan 21, 19, 9:41 am
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I fully accept the OP’s perception: a nice observation! ... Groundspeed v. airspeed is well understood by most here. However, it does make for a quick trip!

As for turbulence, whilst it doesn’t worry me (from a safety POV) it’s bloody annoying. Especially the almost guaranteed batch off Newfoundland during the dinner service! As for thejohn’s experience on the JER sector ... no thanks!!
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Old Jan 21, 19, 10:16 am
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I don't think it's right to suggest that severe turbulence isn't dangerous. While it might not make a plane fall out the sky, it clearly can cause passenger and crew safety issues, ranging from spilled drinks to (at the extreme) nasty head injuries.
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Old Jan 21, 19, 11:19 am
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Originally Posted by Ldnn1 View Post
I don't think it's right to suggest that severe turbulence isn't dangerous. While it might not make a plane fall out the sky, it clearly can cause passenger and crew safety issues, ranging from spilled drinks to (at the extreme) nasty head injuries.
Keep your seatbelt fastened, and avoid hot drinks!
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Old Jan 21, 19, 11:30 am
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Originally Posted by T8191 View Post
Keep your seatbelt fastened, and avoid hot drinks!
...and red wine.
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Old Jan 21, 19, 11:48 am
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Originally Posted by florens View Post
...and red wine.
My concern was more related to the combination of several glasses of wine (and the after effects) + 3 hours of seatbelt sign

Last edited by Chris1988; Jan 21, 19 at 11:49 am Reason: wrong quote
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Old Jan 21, 19, 12:01 pm
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Originally Posted by Chris1988 View Post
My concern was more related to the combination of several glasses of wine (and the after effects) + 3 hours of seatbelt sign

LOL a terrible situation but when nature calls! and yes, unfortunate timing with that big storm blowing over the northeast of US and continuing off to the ocean. however after a few wines like you...well the turbulence like that are a nice soothing feeling to me!
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Old Jan 21, 19, 12:03 pm
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Hi,

I think unusually severe Mountain Wake Turbluence caused a BOAC 707 ( flight 911) to break up close to Mt Fuji in Japan back in 1966 but do not recall any other incidents of turbulence causing a disaster (windshear/microbursts excluded)

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Old Jan 21, 19, 12:04 pm
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Originally Posted by KARFA View Post
It would have taken quite a long and costly routing to avoid the wind over the US and the Atlantic, If the turbulence wasn't dangerous I personally wouldn't want the airline to fly around the houses to avoid it.

Ah, I see another fan of the Windy website as well!

I do not mind turbulence myself, but I remember three years ago flying back to LCY on the Babybus and being lifted off my seat (whilst trying to sleep) because it was so rough. Mind, I still managed a good five hour or so of sleep

H
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Old Jan 21, 19, 12:08 pm
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The worst turbulence (and most prolonged) I’ve ever experienced was on an Emirates flight from Dubai to Singapore many years ago on a B777.

The crew were strapped in for several hours, no service of any kind. However I only found out about this towards the end of the flight when I woke up! I’d managed to sleep through the whole thing. None of them could quite believe it.

Might have helped that I’d polished off a generous amount of Dom (I forget which vintage) before getting my head down.
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