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Careers that allow one to get BAEC GGL at a young age

Careers that allow one to get BAEC GGL at a young age

Old Jan 13, 2019, 1:04 am
  #31  
 
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THE FOLLOWING IS ALL SAID AFFECTIONATELY AND IN JEST.....


....He's mapping 25 years, I couldn't tell you my next 25 days!

There is some amazing advice from some learned voices here and I can only mirror them tbh. I will add that to a large degree no career path is either a sure fire way or one which will exclude you from travel. Learning how to game the airlines as much as possible is probably a better approach than trying to map a large and highly changeable part of your life. It is certainly commendable that you are looking forward but I am sure I wont be alone in pointing out that with most your life ahead of you it's wise to remember you have no idea what is around the corner be it good or bad.

Hard work, research and good time management can allow you to travel the world if your passionate and committed enough. GFL is certainly something to have but not something i'd look to structure my life around especially as none of us know what tomorrow holds and how life may affect us.
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Old Jan 13, 2019, 1:38 am
  #32  
 
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The most successful people don't fly anywhere in their jobs, they pay others to run around the world for them. So aim higher.

re prestige for getting GGL at a young age, it will no doubt result in recognition, but be aware that the recognition may not always be positive.
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Old Jan 13, 2019, 1:46 am
  #33  
 
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I echo a lot of what is said above.

I have ended up following a similar path to one of those OP sets out (so far!), and barely travel for work at all. I'm quite happy with that. Some of my colleagues with slightly different focuses travel a lot more. None of us could predict any of this when we were 18, and nor would we have wanted to.

(Also, working in London, New York and Hong Kong simultaneously sounds unbelievably tiring!)
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Old Jan 13, 2019, 1:59 am
  #34  
 
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Like most people here, Iím wondering why GGL is the goal? A better primary goal would be to choose a career with travel to places you actually want to see. If you like high end cities then a career in finance would suit. If you want wildernesses then mining might be better. Remember that outside banking and finance most business travel will not land you somewhere fashionable or comfortable.

A useful secondary goal would be to get into a career or company where a minimum of business class is assured, at least for flights over four hours. This will make international travel far more comfortable and may allow you to reach top tier on more than one airline. While I love my job and the travel it entails I am only allowed to book coach for all air travel and that literally and figuratively hurts sometimes.

Be wary of trying to join a company with the goal of fulfilling your personal travel plans, even with a good Oxbridge degree. Even worse is trying to leverage business class air travel as a new hire. Hiring managers are turned off by people like that as they see them as trying to use the company dollar to see the world who wonít necessarily be focused on the job in hand.

Finally, your best chance of achieving any lofty goal is to work hard at what you do now. A first or double first in PPE at Oxbridge will open many, many doors for you. Focus on that for the next three years and always be ready for networking and you should be well on your way.
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Old Jan 13, 2019, 2:15 am
  #35  
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Originally Posted by roberino
Finally, your best chance of achieving any lofty goal is to work hard at what you do now. A first or double first in PPE at Oxbridge will open many, many doors for you. Focus on that for the next three years and always be ready for networking and you should be well on your way.
Indeed my young cousin (he's in his early 30s) has made a few appearances here, he has a First PPE, and promptly took a lifelong vow of poverty and chastity. He seems very happy, mind, but that may be because he drinks and swears more than me.

I don't have anything of substance to add to the carefully considered points above, other than it is worth occasionally asking yourself this question: "are you doing something now, which in five years' time will still motivate you to get up in the morning raring to go?". Oh, and don't dismiss public service - it doesn't always get a good rap but few things are more fulfilling than serving your country, in whatever way you wish to define that.
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Old Jan 13, 2019, 3:40 am
  #36  
 
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Just to add a slightly different perspective, I ended up (by sheer chance) in a role in my early twenties that allowed me to travel J and occasionally F a few times a year. My first CW flight with work aged 22 is still an experience I remember!

However, now somewhat (ahem) older and still travelling in J/F for work a few times a year, the J/F trips I enjoy the most, by far, are those with my family for leisure. I feel very fortunate that my career has allowed me to be in a position to fly Premium for my much cherished personal travel. The work travel, for me, really is just a Ďnice to haveí.
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Old Jan 13, 2019, 3:42 am
  #37  
 
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Enjoy your student years while you can, whilst 3 years seems a long time, it will fly by and get out of University what you want from it. If you want to go for 1st class degree and a masters etc then go for it, my time was not the most academic. I was in the gym or in the rowing boat but I scraped a respectable degree and wouldn't change it for the world, I got from it what I wanted.

If you don't know what you want to do now don't worry, just go with the flow and see what opportunities come to you. The most interesting people I've met often don't know what they want to do now, even after spending years at large/successful companies.

To try and answer your original question. I've spoke to and met countless people travelling and more often than not the careers are so varied.

There are the obvious patterns, banking, consulting, big 4 audit firms, oil and gas, however I have friends who work for these multinationals and sometimes they have to battle for J travel in the early years of their career.

What you also have to consider is that often the multinationals you are going from corporate office to corporate office in the world cities, with
perhaps occasional visit to a regional one. Whilst making shuttles to New York and Hong Kong at first sounds great, believe me in time the same places wear thin.

Personally I am lucky that my job, which is sales in a specific area allows me a varied travel schedule, of course I am still visiting places again. I always remember one gentleman `I met who was a Singaporean, living in Switzerland who looks for FIFA implementing common referee practice with all of its member countries, it just proves endless careers can take you places.

Good luck in your future endavours
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Old Jan 13, 2019, 3:45 am
  #38  
 
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Originally Posted by corporate-wage-slave
He seems very happy, mind, but that may be because he drinks and swears more than me.
To be fair you set a fairly low bar CWS

To the OP, my career has been a range of lucky chances, being in the right place at the right time, and a bit of hard work. The job that I first wanted to do when I graduated disappeared from existance within a couple of years. Although I can't buy-in to the percentage, the sentiment behind the research that Dell undertook that "85% Of Jobs That Will Exist In 2030 Havenít Been Invented Yet" is something that would make me set a general direction rather than a firm path in my career.

Therefore, I will end up with CCR/GGL this year through 95% personal travel, an understanding boss (4 extra weeks unpaid leave if you have a child!), and an even more understanding wife (as I often take the 4 weeks unpaid leave by myself!!).

Therefore I'd say follow what interests you and what you feel will remunerate you well enough to pay for the travel you want - I agree with the other posters who say that even early morning travel feels better when you don't have a day of business meetings at the end of it!

Good luck.
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Old Jan 13, 2019, 3:53 am
  #39  
 
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Well I read the OP a few hours ago but was unsure if it was serious.

To be honest in the world we now live I think it's impossible or even foolish to build one's long term life plan around becoming a GGL. A million and one things can happen along the way, continued enhancements may well make travel a grind once the honeymoon period has worn off, corporates continue to downgrade travel policies and no-one knows whether GGL (or even BA) will exist in 10 years time.

Personally I try to build my life around something I enjoy doing, travel and status are a nice by-product but to be honest IMHO there is more to life than being sat in a steel tube (regardless of status) or lurking around airport waiting rooms.

Doing 60 odd legs is more than enough for me each year, in fact I would encourage the OP to check out the BBC radio programme from last year, none of the people participating really convinced me they enjoyed it and some came across as strange including the guy who droned on in monotone about flights to Tallin.
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Old Jan 13, 2019, 4:06 am
  #40  
 
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xjk1 I love how you are so full of hopes and dreams for your future, and I personally believe we move toward our dreams. The only thing I'm wondering about is you say you want GGL at a young age, but it is worth thinking about why this is so important to you. You enjoy flying - great! But don't worry about the external trinkets of status - do what you really want, and enjoy the rewards (in whatever form they take) when they naturally come
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Old Jan 13, 2019, 4:09 am
  #41  
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Originally Posted by Scots_Al
Go to uni, drink, meet women (or men), have fun. See where your priorities are in a few years.
100x this.
I'm a fellow at Oxford and I see lots of students with a similar mindset to the OP: Study hard, get a good internship, get more internships, network, network, network.
They typically leave uni and go off to some exciting, well paid job. Often one that involves plenty of travelling. But, when you see them at a college dinner 5 years later they're seldom the ones who are happy with life. They *all* talk about wishing they'd made more of their time at uni and not focused so much on what comes after. It's the guys who worked hard(ish) *and* played hard who seem the happiest. Poorer, but happier!

University is a magical time, it is (in my opinion) the perfect balance between responsibilities and freedom. What comes after is important, but leaving uni with happy and fulfilling memories more so.

PS: You're safe, btw. I don't teach any elements of PPE ;-)
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Old Jan 13, 2019, 5:45 am
  #42  
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All the best whichever path you take. ^

Furthest I got through work travel was Peterhead Prison by train and bus from Glasgow. Turned out to be a very interesting day though.
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Old Jan 13, 2019, 6:12 am
  #43  
 
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Just to echo a point that Orbitmic made.
I think it is important.
If you can control your travel yourself it is so much more relaxing.
Some jobs control you and your travel. That is no fun.
I was fortunate when I travelled a lot - for about 10 years I had to get to meeting X in place Y. However, I had control over my time, so if I wanted to go the night before, I could. Some Co.s just dump you on the first plane/train out, and the last one back in.
For a further 15 years I was "global" in 2 corps. In both, I decided my own travel 75% of the time, subject to budget. The 25% was decided by the boss class......who fortunately worked to tough, but doable schedules.
Beware those Cos who just ignore unreasonable schedules.
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Old Jan 13, 2019, 8:04 am
  #44  
 
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You should think longer term, xjk1. I can only echo the people telling you to pursue what you want to do - not what piece of perceived status you may or may not get out of it.

I was a lot like you once, and I think I know how you feel. If you would like to hear my story from one of the fields of work which you cite as interesting to you, please do PM me any time. Happy to give advice
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Old Jan 13, 2019, 8:31 am
  #45  
 
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Originally Posted by simonrp84
100x this.
I'm a fellow at Oxford and I see lots of students with a similar mindset to the OP: Study hard, get a good internship, get more internships, network, network, network.
They typically leave uni and go off to some exciting, well paid job. Often one that involves plenty of travelling. But, when you see them at a college dinner 5 years later they're seldom the ones who are happy with life. They *all* talk about wishing they'd made more of their time at uni and not focused so much on what comes after. It's the guys who worked hard(ish) *and* played hard who seem the happiest. Poorer, but happier!

University is a magical time, it is (in my opinion) the perfect balance between responsibilities and freedom. What comes after is important, but leaving uni with happy and fulfilling memories more so.

PS: You're safe, btw. I don't teach any elements of PPE ;-)
100% with the above. Can I just add, from my experience, the happiest chaps at Oxford college reunions seem to be the Forestry mob. (Some of them even manage to fly quite a lot!). Is it too late to change?
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