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Old Mar 26, 19, 5:43 am
  #121  
 
Join Date: May 2014
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Originally Posted by alpha320 View Post
As flight crew we try a few things to help smooth out the ride for you! Each aircraft type has published a "turbulence penetration" speed, which we target to help reduce the intensity and give us greater margin on our speed between maximum and minimum. (this margin reduces with altitude so the main risk of turbulence is going too fast!) On the Airbus this is Mach 0.76. Despite this, the aeroplane is more than capable of flying through even the most severe turbulence. Often there is no obvious cause so it is hard to avoid, but sometimes ATC give us a heads up about reports from aircraft ahead. These reports help us decide if we want to descend, climb or turn to find smoother air. The place you'll feel turbulence the least is over the wings, nearest the centre of gravity, as the whole aeroplane is pivoting around. You'll feel it most at the rear as the horizontal stabiliser moves frequently to maintain our intended flight path. Up front is also better than at the back! For this reason we ask cabin crew at the rear to be our eyes and ears for the seat belt sign! Hope this helps!
Thank you! I try to avoid sitting down the back as I always feel more movement there, also feel more restricted than in an exit row or a nice flat bed! I feel turbulence far less when lying down.
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Old Mar 26, 19, 6:21 am
  #122  
 
Join Date: Mar 2019
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Originally Posted by RB211 View Post
Great information - thanks! Is the gravity feed backup from the left and right tanks another reason why the center tank is used first?

rb211.
Not really. The tanks fill in a certain order too, so if there is fuel in the centre tank, its because the wing tanks are already full. As a result, there is *always* fuel in the wing tanks. For most flights within Europe the centre tank flies empty.

Last edited by alpha320; Mar 26, 19 at 6:26 am Reason: More info
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Old Mar 26, 19, 7:32 am
  #123  
 
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Originally Posted by alpha320 View Post
Not really. The tanks fill in a certain order too, so if there is fuel in the centre tank, its because the wing tanks are already full. As a result, there is *always* fuel in the wing tanks. For most flights within Europe the centre tank flies empty.
Presumably because the engines are fed fuel from the wing tanks? So there can't ever be a scenario where the wing tanks are empty (unless all the tanks are empty, of course!!)
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Old Mar 26, 19, 7:37 am
  #124  
 
Join Date: Mar 2019
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Originally Posted by peter h View Post
Presumably because the engines are fed fuel from the wing tanks? So there can't ever be a scenario where the wing tanks are empty (unless all the tanks are empty, of course!!)
So if there is fuel in the centre tank (which has two pumps), each engine is supplied by one of the two centre tank pumps. Once the centre tank empties, each engine is supplied by both fuel pumps in its respective wing tank... unless we turn them off to force feeding from the other side to balance an imbalance. You are correct there should never be a scenario where the wing tanks are empty!
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Old Mar 28, 19, 8:23 am
  #125  
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
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Obviously itís subject to change but what aircraft is scheduled for ba2167 in Sunday? Assume itís G-VIIV?
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Old Mar 28, 19, 9:03 am
  #126  
 
Join Date: May 2017
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Here's my question:

We get a lot of questions on this forum (including the post immediately above!) about which frame is going to be allocated on a particular rotation. I am guilty of worrying about this too, particularly on routes where there is product variability on the same route from day-to-day (e.g. variation among the Mid-J 744 fleet). The allocations are (to outside punters like myself) quite unpredictable, with some frames scheduled for a prompt turnaround and others scheduled to sit on the ground for much longer.

My question is -- Who is responsible for allocating frames to particular rotations, and what factors do they take into account when choosing which frame should fly to which destination? Does the approach vary between LGW, LHR T3 and LHR T5?
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Old Mar 28, 19, 9:45 am
  #127  
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
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Originally Posted by hearingdouble View Post
Here's my question:

We get a lot of questions on this forum (including the post immediately above!) about which frame is going to be allocated on a particular rotation. I am guilty of worrying about this too, particularly on routes where there is product variability on the same route from day-to-day (e.g. variation among the Mid-J 744 fleet). The allocations are (to outside punters like myself) quite unpredictable, with some frames scheduled for a prompt turnaround and others scheduled to sit on the ground for much longer.

My question is -- Who is responsible for allocating frames to particular rotations, and what factors do they take into account when choosing which frame should fly to which destination? Does the approach vary between LGW, LHR T3 and LHR T5?
They feature on and off in this documentary, first appearance from 23:30:

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Old Mar 28, 19, 12:13 pm
  #128  
 
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Old Mar 28, 19, 12:15 pm
  #129  
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
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Originally Posted by Can I help you View Post
I believe that they were diverted due to industrial action.
Why is this called an industrial action when us yanks call it a strike? Are they the same thing? Iím just curious.
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Old Mar 28, 19, 12:53 pm
  #130  
 
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Originally Posted by CosmosHuman View Post
Why is this called an industrial action when us yanks call it a strike? Are they the same thing? Iím just curious.
A strike is a specific action whereas industrial action is a general term, and can, and often does mean a strike.

rb211.
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Old Mar 28, 19, 12:55 pm
  #131  
 
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Thank you for the explanation.
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Old Mar 28, 19, 2:28 pm
  #132  
 
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Originally Posted by CosmosHuman View Post
Why is this called an industrial action when us yanks call it a strike? Are they the same thing? I’m just curious.
Originally Posted by RB211 View Post
A strike is a specific action whereas industrial action is a general term, and can, and often does mean a strike.
rb211.
Other examples are the "work to rule" which was used to great effect on the railways (e.g. check all the safety equipment at each stop) and the "go slow" in which the job is done with all deliberate speed (slowly and thoughtfully). Ideally these were not pushed to a limit that would justify discipline.
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Old Mar 28, 19, 2:39 pm
  #133  
 
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Work slow down. I understand.
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Old Mar 28, 19, 3:37 pm
  #134  
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
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Originally Posted by hearingdouble View Post
Here's my question:

We get a lot of questions on this forum (including the post immediately above!) about which frame is going to be allocated on a particular rotation. I am guilty of worrying about this too, particularly on routes where there is product variability on the same route from day-to-day (e.g. variation among the Mid-J 744 fleet). The allocations are (to outside punters like myself) quite unpredictable, with some frames scheduled for a prompt turnaround and others scheduled to sit on the ground for much longer.

My question is -- Who is responsible for allocating frames to particular rotations, and what factors do they take into account when choosing which frame should fly to which destination? Does the approach vary between LGW, LHR T3 and LHR T5?
I think while the fleets are updating itís a common question. This flight was booked as a refurbed 4 class, it just changed to a unfurbed one. With a little one I wanted to check the ife/WiFi status 😄
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Old Mar 31, 19, 8:16 am
  #135  
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
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When an aircraft is positioning, without passengers onboard, does it require any cabin crew?
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