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-   -   Ask the staffer (https://www.flyertalk.com/forum/british-airways-executive-club/1949283-ask-staffer.html)

SaraJH Mar 10, 19 4:14 pm

Oh get away lol!

Seriously, I’ve done an in flight experiment (on more than one occasions) and turbulence is FAR less noticeable when one is prone! Honestly.

Mind you, that’s on ‘big plane equals less bumps” on a small aircraft I still feel it like every other poor delicate tummy passenger!
And of course, once one nearby person has been affected then it takes me a nanosecond.....bleurgh!

BingBongBoy Mar 10, 19 6:25 pm

I never felt sick through turbulence when working at BA.

I have once in my new job on a ferry flight across the Atlantic, but our aircraft does feel turbulence a lot and it was prolonged with no way out of it, so after about 45 minutes I started to feel a little queasy.

MSPeconomist Mar 10, 19 6:32 pm

It might be an urban legend, but some carriers reportedly give prospective cabin crew a very rough ride (either deliberately on an actual flight or in a simulator) as part of their training courses. If someone reacts badly, that recruit presumably would either drop out or flunk out.

BTW, I've always been told that turbulence is better toward the front of the aircraft, so this could explain why business class seems better this way.

LTN Phobia Mar 10, 19 7:34 pm


Originally Posted by SaraJH (Post 30870320)
I do have a valid reason for asking this, I’m absolutely TERRIBLE when it comes to travel sickeness. I was once seasick on a boat that was gently bobbing around in Thailand whilst every one else was snorkelling :eek:

Not a crew member but have something to say about motion sickness in different situations.

Gentle bobbing around can be really bad for sea sickness, depending on how it is. Different sort of bobbing around can trigger motion sickness, or not! The worst I have felt (although I have never actually thrown up due to motion sickness in my life) was bobbing up and down (just basically stationery) on a trial sail off the coast of Australia in a catamaran and got completely becalmed. On the other hand, I have been in rough seas where other people felt pretty bad but I was fine though, and also other 'bobbing up and down' situation and felt perfectly OK.

On the other hand, on one of the very rough flights on a turboprop, I think I was the only person besides the crew members who did not throw up. :D My only annoyance was writing things was nearly impossible and I'd be behind with my work, and I also felt a bit queasy with the smell and sound (it's a different sort of queasiness from the motion-induced one), but not because of the motion.

Yet, put me in a road vehicle and drive in a slightly 'wrong' way (usually to do with unsteady speed control), and I would feel quite queasy...

Different motions affect different people differently, or even the same person differently. Even for the same person and the same kind of motion, it can sometimes make them feel bad or not (e.g. familiarisation, tiredness, food intake etc.).

In other words, don't psych yourself out. If you are worried, pop an anti-motion sickness tablet... They tend to be quite effective.

SQTraveller Mar 11, 19 12:23 am


Originally Posted by SaraJH (Post 30870320)
I do have a valid reason for asking this, Iím absolutely TERRIBLE when it comes to travel sickeness. I was once seasick on a boat that was gently bobbing around in Thailand whilst every one else was snorkelling :eek:

I absolutely hate bobbing around in the water on a boat. I don't get motion sick immediately but I do eventually. I was also on a boat in Thailand and found that although I felt a bit queasy on the boat, once I jumped into the water I actually felt fine!

Waterhorse Mar 11, 19 1:58 am

The nausea is caused by the way our brains work. We get most of our orientation from our vision, it is an incredibly powerful influence on how our brains perceive the world. We gain balance info from our inner ear. The inner ear is very good at detecting change provided the rate of change exceeds a certain threshold. Small, gentle accelerations below that threshold are not perceived and the subsequent correction to normal can be felt as a jolt in the opposite direction. Our vision then tells our brain this is not right and nausea ensues.

On aircraft, our vision tells us very little as all the reference points are fixed, it is the reference points, ie the internal structure of the fuselage that are moving as the aircraft moves, with no external visual clues to the movement then once again, nausea. It is why we tell people with sea sickness to go on deck and stare at the horizon, we give them a fixed visual reference point upon which the brain can then concentrate to marry the visual info with the inner ear data on movement. In a car or aircraft reading, ie generally having oneís head tilted down really adds another dimension to the confusion the brain has to rectify. I get motion sickness in a car f Iím in the back seat reading yet can fly aerobatics without the tiniest bit of nausea.

The inner ear has three semi circular canals all in different planes. Within those canals is a fluid, the density of which matches exactly the density of a small bone, the otolith which sits on some fine hairs. As we move our head, the otolith tends to stay in place due to inertia and thus bends the hairs which then sends a signal to our brain informing it of the motion. The fluid in the ear is very sensitive to alcohol, which changes the density and can cause the otolith to float and signals movement when none is present. This causes the spinning feeling when one is tipsy and lays down.

So so all these things add up to how we feel nausea on an aircraft. We have no sensible visual reference, we fool the semi circular canals with sub threshold accelerations, we place the semi circular canals in the ďwrongĒ oreientaion by tilting the aircraft and we get rapid reversals in motion in turbulence.

Some are are more prone to nausea that others but the biggest two things to do to help are not to drink alcohol and not to put oneís head down at all - donít read etc or work at a laptop or iPad.

MADPhil Mar 11, 19 8:15 am


Originally Posted by MSPeconomist (Post 30870880)
BTW, I've always been told that turbulence is better toward the front of the aircraft, so this could explain why business class seems better this way.

I was in row 1 on a flight a few weeks back which went through a prolonged bumpy patch and the FA cheered us up by saying that it would feel much worse further back.

xtra1 Mar 15, 19 3:30 am

Sitting in the terrace of the CCR at this moment; just been watching those yellow driverless plane-tugs; pushing back planes.
Wondering if they are remote controlled or automatic? Never seen them used at other airports before.

PrivatePilotDR40 Mar 15, 19 3:46 am


Originally Posted by xtra1 (Post 30889539)
Sitting in the terrace of the CCR at this moment; just been watching those yellow driverless plane-tugs; pushing back planes.
Wondering if they are remote controlled or automatic? Never seen them used at other airports before.

Im not a "staffer" or Airport worker, however, these are remotely controlled by the Ramp staff (not sure official title.). However, if you watch the push back you will see personnel walking alongside or close to the push back tug and he will have a controller around their neck. They then disconnect the nose steering pin and control the tug back to its space and show the pilots the disconnected pin.

alex67500 Mar 15, 19 4:48 am

I have a question following BA182 last Monday. We received a text around 4pm telling us the flight would be delayed 2hrs (so 2:15am instead of 0:15). The Captain said the plane was hit by lightning when flying out of LHR on its way over to JFK and that meant some standard maintenance had to be performed.

What kinds of checks are performed in this case? It's pretty obvious that planes get hit by lightning all the time, and it was safe enough to carry on flying over the Atlantic, so I'm wondering if electrics have to be replaced / checked etc. Thanks.

EJetter Mar 15, 19 5:03 am


Originally Posted by PrivatePilotDR40 (Post 30889573)
Im not a "staffer" or Airport worker, however, these are remotely controlled by the Ramp staff (not sure official title.). However, if you watch the push back you will see personnel walking alongside or close to the push back tug and he will have a controller around their neck. They then disconnect the nose steering pin and control the tug back to its space and show the pilots the disconnected pin.

These are called Mototoks

1010101 Mar 15, 19 5:11 am


Originally Posted by alex67500 (Post 30889682)
I have a question following BA182 last Monday. We received a text around 4pm telling us the flight would be delayed 2hrs (so 2:15am instead of 0:15). The Captain said the plane was hit by lightning when flying out of LHR on its way over to JFK and that meant some standard maintenance had to be performed.

What kinds of checks are performed in this case? It's pretty obvious that planes get hit by lightning all the time, and it was safe enough to carry on flying over the Atlantic, so I'm wondering if electrics have to be replaced / checked etc. Thanks.

Depends on the severity. Most important is to find the entry and exit points and then go from there, looking for visible damage and checking the various aircraft systems. There might be nothing or there could be extensive damage. A good friend of mine flying a G650 was grounded for months whilst they fixed the aircraft after a strike.

This is a good summary of what must happen after a strike:

https://www.boeing.com/commercial/ae...les/2012_q4/4/

KARFA Mar 15, 19 5:11 am


Originally Posted by xtra1 (Post 30889539)
Sitting in the terrace of the CCR at this moment; just been watching those yellow driverless plane-tugs; pushing back planes.
Wondering if they are remote controlled or automatic? Never seen them used at other airports before.

yes there is an operator who drives it using a remote control console


https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/8...921/g0yTRZ.jpg

Some more information in this thread https://www.flyertalk.com/forum/brit...push-back.html

flatlander Mar 15, 19 7:45 am


Originally Posted by LTN Phobia (Post 30871078)
If you are worried, pop an anti-motion sickness tablet... They tend to be quite effective.

Indeed, my partner swears by them for driving.

However, do try them out beforehand. In particular beware of Hyoscine which can cause some quite "trippy" feelings in some people. Feeling like you've taken a hallucinogen may not be the effect you are after, and finding this out when you're stuck in an aircraft could be unpleasant. Meanwhile, some others are quite sedative, so that is another thing you may or may not want to deal with. Try them out on the ground first to check the side-effects before you try them in the aircraft, vehicle, or watercraft to check their effectiveness for you.

Bluecardholder Mar 15, 19 7:48 am

This happened to me once coming back from TXL - we were in the Northern stack over Essex and then flew to the Southern Stack over Biggin Hill. The reason given was icing issues. HTH


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