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-   -   Ask the staffer (https://www.flyertalk.com/forum/british-airways-executive-club/1949283-ask-staffer.html)

cxshane Feb 21, 19 9:09 pm

Staff travel - check in at transit desk allowed?
 
Hi, I will be traveling from Hong Kong to Brussels and then onto LHR. I'm wondering, if I've listed already, will I be able to attempt to get my boarding card at the transit desk or will I be required to exit through immigration and customs and go to the check in hall for the boarding card? I will have hand luggage only so don't need to collect bags.
Thanks

Globaliser Mar 3, 19 2:54 am

Retro liveries and ATC
 
The arrival of the retro livery aircraft made me wonder about how ATC refers to these aircraft if they're giving an instruction to other taxiing aircraft to follow them. Peter Sellers jokes aside, is it more complicated than "Follow the Lufthansa", particularly when the BOAC-livery aircraft for example has relatively little on it from the current (or any) BA livery?

I know that many young pilots have a certain enthusiasm for aviation and airlines, but it's not universal and there must be a lot of pilots flying today who never saw a BOAC or BEA livery in real life, and perhaps not even a Negus. Even more senior crew might not have encountered these liveries routinely, depending on where and what they were flying at the time.

george77300 Mar 3, 19 3:07 am


Originally Posted by Globaliser (Post 30841493)
The arrival of the retro livery aircraft made me wonder about how ATC refers to these aircraft if they're giving an instruction to other taxiing aircraft to follow them. Peter Sellers jokes aside, is it more complicated than "Follow the Lufthansa", particularly when the BOAC-livery aircraft for example has relatively little on it from the current (or any) BA livery?

I know that many young pilots have a certain enthusiasm for aviation and airlines, but it's not universal and there must be a lot of pilots flying today who never saw a BOAC or BEA livery in real life, and perhaps not even a Negus. Even more senior crew might not have encountered these liveries routinely, depending on where and what they were flying at the time.

I know itís not the same but when Alaska bought Virgin America and they were all flying ďAlaskaĒ callsign, they would still say to pilots to follow the ďVirgin 320Ē for example. Same when AA/US merger and all sorts of liveries applied.

I would guess they would tell in this case to follow the ďBOAC 747Ē. (With the exception of BA probably, ďfollow company 747Ē should be plenty clear enough for any BA pilots)

In the case of the Landor, that is close enough and says BA on it so I guess that would be normal.

Sigwx Mar 3, 19 3:56 am

Having taxied behind it the other day it was referred to as the ďcompany 747 in BEE OH AY SEA coloursĒ.

rapidex Mar 3, 19 6:02 am


Originally Posted by Globaliser (Post 30841493)
The arrival of the retro livery aircraft made me wonder about how ATC refers to these aircraft if they're giving an instruction to other taxiing aircraft to follow them. Peter Sellers jokes aside, is it more complicated than "Follow the Lufthansa", particularly when the BOAC-livery aircraft for example has relatively little on it from the current (or any) BA livery?

I know that many young pilots have a certain enthusiasm for aviation and airlines, but it's not universal and there must be a lot of pilots flying today who never saw a BOAC or BEA livery in real life, and perhaps not even a Negus. Even more senior crew might not have encountered these liveries routinely, depending on where and what they were flying at the time.

Its no different to the wet lease aircraft, with perhaps a Titan aircraft with a Speedbird callsign.

Globaliser Mar 3, 19 6:56 am


Originally Posted by rapidex (Post 30841820)
Its no different to the wet lease aircraft, with perhaps a Titan aircraft with a Speedbird callsign.

In such a case, would ATC tell another aircraft to follow the Titan, or to follow the Speedbird?

rapidex Mar 3, 19 7:12 am


Originally Posted by Globaliser (Post 30841939)
In such a case, would ATC tell another aircraft to follow the Titan, or to follow the Speedbird?

I would expect ATC to say follow the Titan A320, but if they were busy and made a mistake the average sharp F/O of the caliber BA employ would query it or ask for clarification.

Heathrow Tower Mar 3, 19 9:47 am

We would generally only refer to the colours of the aircraft, so a BOAC 747, or Titan 757, or Air Belgium A340, and in fact we specifically mark such differences to the norm on the flight strip.

However, when we are at a critical point, such as a conditional line up clearance, we might say ‘behind the departing (airline) in (different) colours, line up and wait blah di blah....’, so that the crew we are giving that clearance to are not confused by seeing an Air Belgium A340 while they hear a Speedbird call sign.

SaraJH Mar 10, 19 3:44 pm

Air sickness and crew (turbulence)
 
Firstly, huge apologies, I’ve done a search here and on google and can’t find the Ask the Crew thread.

I’ve read lots of posts today about the extreme wind and pax being sick, how do you crew train for this? If I’m on a lovely BA flight can I guarantee that the crew will be calm and not feeling sick? To be frank I couldn’t care less if the crew were being sick with me but it would be nice to know that they weren’t!


Just a note from one of the mods to say that the thread has been merged into the Ask the Crew thread after a kind FT member (thank you, you know who you are!) provided the link.
LTN Phobia, BA forum moderator

SaraJH Mar 10, 19 3:49 pm

I do have a valid reason for asking this, Iím absolutely TERRIBLE when it comes to travel sickeness. I was once seasick on a boat that was gently bobbing around in Thailand whilst every one else was snorkelling :eek:

Can I help you Mar 10, 19 3:51 pm

I have never even felt the slightest sick and I have been flying a very very long time, I’m guessing my body and especially my ears have adapted to the movement.

SaraJH Mar 10, 19 3:56 pm


Originally Posted by Can I help you (Post 30870327)
I have never even felt the slightest sick and I have been flying a very very long time, Iím guessing my body and especially my ears have adapted to the movement.

Thatís great to know. I do know that Iím in the minority but itís comforting to know that the crew (sample of one lol) arenít like me!

Can I help you Mar 10, 19 3:59 pm

However I often feel sick if I try to read in a car or on a bus.

SaraJH Mar 10, 19 4:03 pm


Originally Posted by Can I help you (Post 30870354)
However I often feel sick if I try to read in a car or on a bus.

That is interesting, Iím NEVER sick in a car but give me a boat and then itís guaranteed, aircraft hmmm yes, if itís bumpy!
what I find most interesting is that if Iím in Club World or Tesco First then I donít feel turbulence at all, no idea if it has to do with the prone position or the alcohol!

Can I help you Mar 10, 19 4:07 pm

I’m guessing alcohol. :D


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