FlyerTalk Forums

FlyerTalk Forums (https://www.flyertalk.com/forum/index.php)
-   British Airways | Executive Club (https://www.flyertalk.com/forum/british-airways-executive-club-446/)
-   -   Ask the staffer (https://www.flyertalk.com/forum/british-airways-executive-club/1949283-ask-staffer.html)

woglet86 Jun 24, 19 6:09 am

I saw on the CSM’s iPad recently flying Dublin to Heathrow that my seat number was in green, and said “CR” underneath or beside it, as well as a little arrow. Does anybody know what this means? Mine was the only seat number in green as far as I could tell.

I also think, but can’t be sure, that at some point my entry moved to the top of the list, whereas initially it was further down the list as I was in row 2. I would have assumed in order of seat number would be the default.

I had been upgraded shortly before boarding, the flight was full.

Thanks!

Can I help you Jun 24, 19 6:30 am

It indicates you were upgraded, very very rarely we have customers with a red downward arrow when downgraded.

Can I help you Jun 24, 19 6:32 am

There are two ways that we can view the customer lists, either by seat row or by value, you may have been at the top of the list as a GGL.

BoeBus Jun 24, 19 7:46 am

Single Engine Taxi
 
A few questions about single engine taxi please:

When do you [decide to] start the second engine?
Do you keep the APU running and use it’s bleed air to start the second engine or is it the first engine’s job?
When taxying on one engine do you have to compensate when turning for the asymmetric thrust or is this automatically done?

Thanks for satisfying my geeky curiosity!

Sigwx Jun 24, 19 9:25 am


Originally Posted by BoeBus (Post 31233800)
A few questions about single engine taxi please:

When do you [decide to] start the second engine?
Do you keep the APU running and use it’s bleed air to start the second engine or is it the first engine’s job?
When taxying on one engine do you have to compensate when turning for the asymmetric thrust or is this automatically done?

Thanks for satisfying my geeky curiosity!


we liase with ATC as to how long we can expect before line up clearance. This gives us time to start the engine, allow it to run for a specified time dependant on engine type before we are allowed to apply rake off thrust (engine warm up) and complete the after start and before take off procedures. Yes APU bleed is used. The APU burns tea spoons compared to engines at idle and yes re the asymmetric thrust. Not a massive issue given the levels involved though. If we’d be needing a lot of thrust we would start both together.

BoeBus Jun 24, 19 1:18 pm


Originally Posted by Sigwx (Post 31234085)



we liase with ATC as to how long we can expect before line up clearance. This gives us time to start the engine, allow it to run for a specified time dependant on engine type before we are allowed to apply rake off thrust (engine warm up) and complete the after start and before take off procedures. Yes APU bleed is used. The APU burns tea spoons compared to engines at idle and yes re the asymmetric thrust. Not a massive issue given the levels involved though. If we’d be needing a lot of thrust we would start both together.

Brilliant, many thanks!

Heathrow Tower Jun 24, 19 1:28 pm


Originally Posted by Lost-in-Space (Post 31227954)
This one for the ATCOs:

When (if?!) the third runway is operating at LHR, how will it be used? To get a balanced utilisation of all three runways, will one be in mixed mode i.e. departures and landings? And, if so, which runway would be mixed mode?

Thanks!

Heathrow Airport are planning to use the 3 runways in four different configurations and rotate through them to provide respite.

You can see them described in the latest consultation that has just opened.

Essentially, if you consider working from northernmost to southernmost, and where M=Mixed, D=Departures and L=Landing, the modes will be;
MDL
MLD
LDM
DLM

Mixed mode won’t be a planned configuration on the middle runway, because the missed approach procedure has to go straight ahead (there’s a runway either side), which means it will conflict with a departure from the same runway (ideally you’d want the missed approach to turn away from the runway if there’s a departure just getting airborne). To enable mixed mode on the middle runway, you’d have to build in a procedural longitudinal separation, for example, the departure must be rolling by the time the inbound is at 6nm from touchdown (so that if there is a go around, there’s enough separation from the departure).....this restriction would cripple the throughput of that runway.

Hope that makes sense!


Takiteasy Jun 24, 19 3:45 pm


Originally Posted by Heathrow Tower (Post 31234846)


Heathrow Airport are planning to use the 3 runways in four different configurations and rotate through them to provide respite.

You can see them described in the latest consultation that has just opened.

Essentially, if you consider working from northernmost to southernmost, and where M=Mixed, D=Departures and L=Landing, the modes will be;
MDL
MLD
LDM
DLM

Mixed mode won’t be a planned configuration on the middle runway, because the missed approach procedure has to go straight ahead (there’s a runway either side), which means it will conflict with a departure from the same runway (ideally you’d want the missed approach to turn away from the runway if there’s a departure just getting airborne). To enable mixed mode on the middle runway, you’d have to build in a procedural longitudinal separation, for example, the departure must be rolling by the time the inbound is at 6nm from touchdown (so that if there is a go around, there’s enough separation from the departure).....this restriction would cripple the throughput of that runway.

Hope that makes sense!


Super interesting, many thanks. Currently there are only 2 configurations LD, DL and they get swapped according to the day of the month, and every day at 3pm. So basically each configuration is used 50% of the time.
Once we move to 4 configs, when will they be in use? 25% of the time each on average?

Heathrow Tower Jun 24, 19 3:48 pm


Originally Posted by Takiteasy (Post 31235383)

Super interesting, many thanks. Currently there are only 2 configurations LD, DL and they get swapped according to the day of the month, and every day at 3pm. So basically each configuration is used 50% of the time.
Once we move to 4 configs, when will they be in use? 25% of the time each on average?

All of that detail is being consulted on at the moment, along with matters such as keeping, reversing or abandoning the westerly preference.

TheFlyingCyclist Jun 24, 19 3:49 pm

I didn’t think 09L is currently used for departures?

Takiteasy Jun 24, 19 4:04 pm


Originally Posted by Heathrow Tower (Post 31235396)


All of that detail is being consulted on at the moment, along with matters such as keeping, reversing or abandoning the westerly preference.

Consultations (whether for Heathrow runways, before a round of corporate redundancies, or prior to changing the schedule of a school) tend to be purely a box ticking exercise. There must be a preference, published or not, from the airport/airlines. Any insight as to what that is?
[Disclaimer: am affected by LHR flight paths yet strongly in favour of Rwy3]

alex67500 Jun 24, 19 4:30 pm


Originally Posted by Heathrow Tower (Post 31235396)
All of that detail is being consulted on at the moment, along with matters such as keeping, reversing or abandoning the westerly preference.

You mean like LCY where they really turn depending on the wind? Or could LHR go to easterly as default and only pivot if conditions get bad?

Heathrow Tower Jun 24, 19 11:28 pm


Originally Posted by Takiteasy (Post 31235470)

Consultations (whether for Heathrow runways, before a round of corporate redundancies, or prior to changing the schedule of a school) tend to be purely a box ticking exercise. There must be a preference, published or not, from the airport/airlines. Any insight as to what that is?
[Disclaimer: am affected by LHR flight paths yet strongly in favour of Rwy3]

If you read the consultation, you’ll see that HAL are going to use all four modes equally, and the consultation is on the duration of period of each mode.

Heathrow Tower Jun 24, 19 11:31 pm


Originally Posted by alex67500 (Post 31235572)
You mean like LCY where they really turn depending on the wind? Or could LHR go to easterly as default and only pivot if conditions get bad?

Currently, LHR operates a westerly preference, so that means we continue on westerlies (Landing FROM London, taking off TO Windsor) up to a 5kt easterly wind (5kt tailwind) in order to reduce noise over west London.

The consultation is trying to determine whether that stays or changes.

Lost-in-Space Jun 25, 19 2:58 am


Originally Posted by Heathrow Tower (Post 31234846)


Heathrow Airport are planning to use the 3 runways in four different configurations and rotate through them to provide respite.

You can see them described in the latest consultation that has just opened.

Essentially, if you consider working from northernmost to southernmost, and where M=Mixed, D=Departures and L=Landing, the modes will be;
MDL
MLD
LDM
DLM

Mixed mode won’t be a planned configuration on the middle runway, because the missed approach procedure has to go straight ahead (there’s a runway either side), which means it will conflict with a departure from the same runway (ideally you’d want the missed approach to turn away from the runway if there’s a departure just getting airborne). To enable mixed mode on the middle runway, you’d have to build in a procedural longitudinal separation, for example, the departure must be rolling by the time the inbound is at 6nm from touchdown (so that if there is a go around, there’s enough separation from the departure).....this restriction would cripple the throughput of that runway.

Hope that makes sense!


HeathrowTower, many thanks, nicely explained!


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:20 pm.


This site is owned, operated, and maintained by MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Designated trademarks are the property of their respective owners.