Cabin Temperature

Old Oct 24, 18, 7:34 am
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Cabin Temperature

I've just returned from a return trip to JNB.

The outbound was in Club sat in 53k and the return was in First in 3k. A380 both times.
The cabin during the night of the outbound flight was unbearable. Several people complained but apparently it has to be set at 23 degrees which felt and seems extremely high.

Last night was the same story although the crew did agree to drop the temp a little but still not enough to want to have a cover over me.

Am I crazy in thinking BA have this the wrong way around. With Club and First being supplied with bedding including duvets, why wouldn't they want the cabin a little cooler so people can get snug under duvet. Instead they have it too hot, which you can't escape!

Thoughts/preferences?
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Old Oct 24, 18, 7:40 am
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The recommended temperature is 21/22c on a night flight. All you can do is ask the crew to turn it down if you are too hot but there are limits of course as there may be 13 other viewpoints in the same cabin.
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Old Oct 24, 18, 8:12 am
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Originally Posted by eugegall View Post
Several people complained but apparently it has to be set at 23 degrees which felt and seems extremely high.
it is too high for a night flight. BA cabin crew donít seem to be able to grasp the concept of sleeping under a duvet/white company blanket in 23 degrees. Yes there are other people in the cabin, but it is far easier to stick another layer on and warm up, than it is to cool down - you canít exactly take your clothes off!

I have seen the policy in writing and I know that it should be set to somewhere around 21 degrees at night. This is still too warm for me, but it is better than 23 degrees. So when the crew told you it has to be set to 23 degrees, then theyíre either lacking in knowledge of their procedures or they are lying.

The A380 has underfloor heating in the galleys and the crew (who understandably get cold at night), instead of turning up the underfloor heating, they whack the temperature up in the cabin, but with the curtains closed at night what this does is create a mini sauna in the cabin and very little heat escapes through the thick curtain that separates the galley from the cabin. This, I believe, is the reason they turn it up so much as they canít feel the effect unless they do so. Itís completely unacceptable and instead of sitting on their jumpseats and getting cold in the middle of the night, they should move around more and wear a jumper. They are after all still on duty at this point.
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Old Oct 24, 18, 8:56 am
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I agree the temperature should be set at 21c.
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Old Oct 24, 18, 9:04 am
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last month coming back from HKG in 53K unusually I was cold. I was sleeping without the duvet as normal, so when I looked for my duvet my seat mate had mine as well as his so it must have been cold. I never need a duvet no matter what airline I travel with, it was a pleasant change and I did go back to sleep without a duvet. No way was the cabin temp was 21/22c range.
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Old Oct 24, 18, 9:27 am
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Originally Posted by BApilotinsider View Post
The recommended temperature is 21/22c on a night flight. All you can do is ask the crew to turn it down if you are too hot but there are limits of course as there may be 13 other viewpoints in the same cabin.
I just roll down the window an inch or so when this happens.
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Old Oct 24, 18, 9:37 am
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My last A380 flight to JNB was in WTP, slept for 7 hours.
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Old Oct 24, 18, 9:39 am
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I am always too cold on planes!
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Old Oct 24, 18, 9:46 am
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The perennial BA complaint. Every other airline manages to keep their planes temperate, but BA insist that you boil gently for 7 hours so that you can arrive at your destination nicely fusty and sweaty.

The ideal temperature for sleeping is actually more like 18C, as countless studies have shown.

Last edited by opalfruit; Oct 24, 18 at 9:57 am
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Old Oct 24, 18, 9:56 am
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This is one of my pet hates. I do think it is better than it used to be but I remember a number of flights where the crew have told me that they specifically turn the temperature up on the "sleeping" section of the flight. This always seem unbelievably odd to me as almost everyone I know goes to bed and their heating turns off around that time! I only know one couple who leave the heating on all night! Due to this we have only stayed there once and even with it being January and us opening both windows full whack we both roasted all night!

Even in economy there are blankets to go around and even with a blanket 20+ degrees is way too hot as you are still in your clothes!!! Crazy.
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Old Oct 24, 18, 10:08 am
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Originally Posted by highexpectations View Post
... you can’t exactly take your clothes off!

Well no, of course not but you can reduce them. I was on an A380 overnight on Monday night and changed into very lightweight shorts and a tee shirt once I boarded. Slept the whole way and I am someone who normally finds the temperature on the high side. The idea of wearing the BA pajamas or anything remotely heavy like that would make temperature control a lot harder for me.

Originally Posted by highexpectations View Post
I have seen the policy in writing and I know that it should be set to somewhere around 21 degrees at night. This is still too warm for me, but it is better than 23 degrees. So when the crew told you it has to be set to 23 degrees, then they’re either lacking in knowledge of their procedures or they are lying.
Originally Posted by highexpectations View Post
Here we go with the L word again. There are loads of other explanations. Maybe the crew member made a mistake and gave the wrong figure even though procedures were followed, perhaps the number was heard incorrectly etc etc. Why would a crew member lie about it? The world is not black and white.
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Last edited by golfmad; Oct 24, 18 at 10:43 am
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Old Oct 24, 18, 10:21 am
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Like the OP, I need cool temps to sleep soundly. I'd set it at 17 C if I could, but I realize that's not what most people want. I've discovered on a few flights over the years that on some planes it is significantly cooler right next to an emergency door/window. I'm not sure what exactly accounts for that, but the result is a happy one from my perspective.
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Old Oct 24, 18, 10:32 am
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Originally Posted by opalfruit View Post
The perennial BA complaint. Every other airline manages to keep their planes temperate,
You obviously don't fly JAL.

(JAL aircraft are conditioned to ~25C, like the rest of Japan)

Meanwhile, it may well be that 18C is a reasonable temperature for most people from temperate regions in the world to sleep, but that is assuming they are: from a temperate region, asleep, in a bed with typical bed linen (including some insulating top cover), in a room without strong airflow (which causes extra cooling).

Aircraft, meanwhile, have: some people asleep and some not, people not all from a temperate region, not asleep in a bed with typical bed linen (especially in economy), in an environment with strong airflow.

So 21C, the typical design temperature for buildings in most of the world for waking activity, is a much more reasonable compromise.

If you want to be cold, sit by the exit row on an old aircraft, especially the emergency exits of a 767. Cold enough for anyone!
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Old Oct 24, 18, 10:42 am
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Originally Posted by flatlander View Post
You obviously don't fly JAL.

(JAL aircraft are conditioned to ~25C, like the rest of Japan)
Note to self: Never fly JAL
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Old Oct 24, 18, 10:52 am
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53A on UD A380 was the most uncomfortable Iíve ever been on a plane; it was roasting overnight. Crew said it was set to 21 degrees. On the way home I was in 51A, or perhaps 50A I donít remember, the same cabin temp was set and yet it was a lot cooler. It seems that even within a deck, temps can vary a huge amount.
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