Frozen on IBZ-LCY yesterday (cold cabin)

Old Sep 24, 18, 6:46 am
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Frozen on IBZ-LCY yesterday (cold cabin)

My OH and I froze our tails off on our flight back from IBZ yesterday. I noticed a few more people wearing jackets, hoodies, etc., which seems to suggest that we were not the only ones who thought that the cabin was a bit cold.

I mentioned it to the CSM who looked very surprised and said it was set to 20 degrees. She said she would change it to 21. I think she did because I saw her move the thermostat. For a little while the cabin felt a little bit less cold.

Later on, however, we felt cold again and on my way to the toilet I saw that the temperature was set back at 20 degrees.

Now, a 20 degrees setting sounds quite low to me. Maybe it felt even colder as we were coming from 30 degrees.

Is this a normal temperature for a short-haul flight? Perhaps she was trying to make us adjust to the temperature difference shock on landing?
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Old Sep 24, 18, 7:10 am
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I'm happy at 20, my wife freezes below 25 and the one time she ran me a bath I thought she was trying to boil me alive

Passengers competing for the thermostat and likely no more
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Old Sep 24, 18, 7:10 am
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Old Sep 24, 18, 7:14 am
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It's very difficult to control the temperature on the E170/E190. Often one end of the aircraft will be hot and the other end cold - usually the rear is colder than the front (it's not unusual for tiny pellets of ice to come out of the vents in the last few rows) but sometimes it's the other way around and the rear can be like a sauna, and the slightest turn of the thermostat can result in surprisingly dramatic changes.

Also as the two cabin crew are kept very busy on these flights and in Euro Traveller have to pass through the cabin three times to complete the service - food (which may involve practically climbing into the full size meal trolley to reach the ones at the back), bar, clear in - their perception of the temperature in the cabin will likely be quite different to those of passengers sitting under the air vents.
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Old Sep 24, 18, 7:16 am
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Twenty celsius for me is perfect, if a little warm. Current temperature in this Northumberland house (no central heating): 17.6c. We just need to invent some farm animal which grows a warming offcut product, suitable for clothing, in return for eating grass. It's so individual that there isn't a right or wrong about it, however pressurisation seems to add a dimension to it, cold dry air really getting to some people. Best to have the aircraft cool so you add clothing, rather than hot since you really don't want the reverse.
Oh and never believe an aircraft thermostat!
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Old Sep 24, 18, 7:23 am
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20C is a VERY long way from freezing and surely a very warm day to any true Brit. We have the house thermostat set to 18C during the winter and it feels very comfortable to us 2 old pensioners.
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Old Sep 24, 18, 7:28 am
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On an E190 ZRH-LCY a few weeks ago, I think I took my jumper on and off about 5 times, as the temperature soared and dropped wildly, like a Cessna approaching FNC. I was in row 12, so I can only imagine what extremes the poor chaps at either end of the cabin must have endured. For future flights, I will dress for the beach, but bring a winter sleeping bag in my carry-on.
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Old Sep 24, 18, 7:31 am
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Originally Posted by quakered View Post
20C is a VERY long way from freezing and surely a very warm day to any true Brit. We have the house thermostat set to 18C during the winter and it feels very comfortable to us 2 old pensioners.
Just because it was set to 20C doesn't mean the cabin was actually 20C.
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Old Sep 24, 18, 7:32 am
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Hahahaha I'm always very suspicious of Ibiza pax- who knows what's got into them?
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Old Sep 24, 18, 7:36 am
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As a building services engineer - we design school classrooms, offices and domestic living rooms at 21 deg C. Any sleeping areas have a night time temp of 16 deg C.

Cabin crew will be under pressure to keep costs down by ensuring correct temperatures are maintained.

I iusually find when office workers (usually female) are moaning it is too cold, they are the ones wearing strappy tops. Any suggestion to put on a jumper/cardigan is usually met with an indignant look!!
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Old Sep 24, 18, 7:39 am
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Originally Posted by Globaliser View Post
My advice: Let it go.
Originally Posted by zappomatic View Post
it's not unusual for tiny pellets of ice to come out of the vents in the last few rows
A woman in the row across mine complained to the CSM that (her exact words) “it was snowing”.
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Old Sep 24, 18, 7:40 am
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Originally Posted by FEMW View Post
Cabin crew will be under pressure to keep costs down by ensuring correct temperatures are maintained.
I've always wondered: do aircraft naturally cool down or heat up during flight? Given it's usually -50C outside i'd assumed that heating the cabin requires energy, although a metal tube in direct sunlight for several hours would presumably attract a lot of heat...
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Old Sep 24, 18, 7:40 am
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Originally Posted by FEMW View Post
Cabin crew will be under pressure to keep costs down by ensuring correct temperatures are maintained.
would there be any relationship between cabin temperature and cost on a plane?

the air conditioning packs run constantly on a plane and there isn’t really an option to turn them off unlike in a building to save some money.

EDIT: here is a nice explanation of how it works on a plane https://www.flyertalk.com/forum/25835713-post1428.html
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Old Sep 24, 18, 7:42 am
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Originally Posted by FEMW View Post
As a building services engineer - we design school classrooms, offices and domestic living rooms at 21 deg C. Any sleeping areas have a night time temp of 16 deg C.

Cabin crew will be under pressure to keep costs down by ensuring correct temperatures are maintained.

I iusually find when office workers (usually female) are moaning it is too cold, they are the ones wearing strappy tops. Any suggestion to put on a jumper/cardigan is usually met with an indignant look!!
You see, I was fine at 21 degrees. Just not at 20 ;-)

I eventually wore my jacket, but I couldn’t be bothered to open my suitcase and take out some jeans to wear.

I usually avoid wearing shorts on flights.
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Old Sep 24, 18, 8:07 am
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But it assuredly wasn't zero!
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