BA15 and dealing with jet lag

Old Jul 26, 17, 7:50 am
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BA15 and dealing with jet lag

I fly a lot but nearly all of it is to US (been there over 100 times now).

Tomorrow is my first flight to Australia (LHR-SIN-SYD). I then have the weekend to try to start to adjust to local time zones.

What sleep patterns do people find work well on the flight though? Given the flight leaves at 9:30 the tendency would be to sleep fairly shortly after that, but that's around the start of the day in Australia? Is it better to stay awake as long as possible and try to sleep in the later part of the LHR-SIN leg?

I guess I am lucky though. I booked CW and BA gave me a free upgrade to F on the outbound, though I have no idea why given I don't think there's any promotions on at present!
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Old Jul 26, 17, 7:56 am
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I prefer to sleep on the last leg, i.e SIN-SYD. That way I'm really tired once I hit SIN, so I have no problem sleeping.
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Old Jul 26, 17, 7:59 am
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I sleep as much as I possibly can on both legs.
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Old Jul 26, 17, 7:59 am
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You have ~24 hours of flying to get your 8 hours of sleep for the 'night' so get as much as you can, when you can. I tend to just sleep when I'm tired onboard, and then when i arrive force myself into the new timezone. There's really no getting around the jetlag on that flight.
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Old Jul 26, 17, 7:59 am
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I find it challenging whichever cabin you're in, and what ever tactic I find it doesn't work ! Last year I arrived at SYD and made it to the city by 7am. Hotel allowed (thankfully) a very early check in where I had 3 hours sleep with alarm set, then made it through the day. I think a bulk of my sleep happens annoyingly on the LHR-SYD leg. Enjoy the F
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Old Jul 26, 17, 8:06 am
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After 20 years of 7, 8, 9,11 and 12 hours of time changes I have given up and simply sleep when it feels right and then go for it at the other end - the quicker the better. Strangely I almost find it easier to do a 12 hour switch than a 7 hour one.
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Old Jul 26, 17, 8:18 am
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My approach - stay awake for all / most of LON-SIN, shower and a meal in the Qantas lounge in T1 (next to BA lounge) then sleep most of the SIN-SYD leg. Seems the best way to bounce myself into the local time zone...
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Old Jul 26, 17, 8:34 am
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Melatonin has saved my life on long haul Asia flights of which I frequent, and frequently in Y. Just an additional tool to consider.
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Old Jul 26, 17, 8:50 am
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Originally Posted by lhrjfkpax View Post
My approach - stay awake for all / most of LON-SIN, shower and a meal in the Qantas lounge in T1 (next to BA lounge) then sleep most of the SIN-SYD leg. Seems the best way to bounce myself into the local time zone...
+1
Because you have a whole day ahead of you after landing in SYD and the longer you last that day, the better it will be.
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Old Jul 26, 17, 8:53 am
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It's almost impossible to stay awake for LHR-SIN - especially after numerous dinners and drinks (CCR & onboard)
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Old Jul 26, 17, 10:15 am
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Originally Posted by 1010101 View Post
You have ~24 hours of flying to get your 8 hours of sleep for the 'night' so get as much as you can, when you can. I tend to just sleep when I'm tired onboard, and then when i arrive force myself into the new timezone. There's really no getting around the jetlag on that flight.
I agree I have flown to and from NZ/Aus at least 20 times. Experiences with jet lag have been variable but I find it much more difficult to cope with if I'm also sleep deprived.
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Old Jul 26, 17, 10:21 am
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This is my commute. Sleep as much as you can on both legs and then force yourself to stay awake until at least 2000 that night. You will then probably wake up at 0400. Gut it through again and you should be reet the next day.
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Old Jul 26, 17, 10:22 am
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Originally Posted by pomkiwi View Post
I agree I have flown to and from NZ/Aus at least 20 times. Experiences with jet lag have been variable but I find it much more difficult to cope with if I'm also sleep deprived.
Indeed. Long distance flying incurs both actual jet lag and sleep deprivation. It can be hard to separate the two or find best solutions to one or the other. I find countermeasures to jet lag that extend sleep deprivation to be worse than useless. I haven't been much attracted to medicinal approaches as experiments with melatonin have not had much effect, I am not into mixing alcohol and travel, and would not touch ambien. For others YMMV.
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Old Jul 26, 17, 10:34 am
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Originally Posted by CALlegacy View Post
Indeed. Long distance flying incurs both actual jet lag and sleep deprivation. It can be hard to separate the two or find best solutions to one or the other. I find countermeasures to jet lag that extend sleep deprivation to be worse than useless. I haven't been much attracted to medicinal approaches as experiments with melatonin have not had much effect, I am not into mixing alcohol and travel, and would not touch ambien. For others YMMV.
I agree with the first part of this. I used to think it was key to just get onto the other time zone. If I flew from JFK-HKG at 1:30am (the late CX flight), five years ago I would try and force myself to stay awake for hours.

Now I'm generally of the mind, resting while traveling is good. Maybe try and avoid a heavy eight hour sleep before arriving somewhere at night. But otherwise, get some rest when you can and force yourself into a heavy sleep on the overnight sectors that arrive in the morning.

I disagree with the later part. May I ask why you don't like mixing alcohol and travel (I find alcohol key to getting myself to a nap on westbound transatlantic that leave the UK mid-day) and wouldn't touch ambien (a critical component to any red eye sleeping/jet lag management strategy)? As I said to a colleague during some ridiculously impractical seminar on sleep management that touched on some impractical jet lag management tips, "I deal with jet lag with brute force: alcohol, caffeine, and ambien." Not all three at once of course.
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Old Jul 26, 17, 10:58 am
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Originally Posted by mikeyfly View Post
It's almost impossible to stay awake for LHR-SIN - especially after numerous dinners and drinks (CCR & onboard)
I agree, but I would agree with #2 - to maximize sleep on the SIN-SYD leg. If at all possible...
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