FLounge wifi blocking FT?!

Old Mar 15, 16, 10:10 pm
  #31  
 
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Originally Posted by k_getchell View Post
Someone else mentioned security in layers. This is the key. Up to date software and appropriate tools (VPN, Firewall, AV etc)

However scare tactics aren't the way to go. Sensible conversations about the realistic risks are far more likely to yield results.
That was me. >>>Here

Where are the scare tactics? I am stating technical facts, please reread the part about commercial products that decrypt https on the fly.

Again let me point you to Kapersky regarding the risks & mitigation: https://usa.kaspersky.com/internet-s...lic-wifi-risks

Last edited by ABeautifulPlaceInThe; Mar 15, 16 at 10:21 pm
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Old Mar 15, 16, 10:48 pm
  #32  
 
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Originally Posted by where2travel View Post
This always seems to happen to me. I get around it by going to Google and just searching for "Flyertalk British Airways forum" and you can access here via a direct link. This is instead of typing "www.flyertalk.com" into the address field and going from there, which brings up the block message.
Same for me - it's always been the case in the lounge at MAN as well IME. Not having much of a clue about these things, I take a similar route as above to solve it.
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Old Mar 16, 16, 1:16 am
  #33  
 
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Originally Posted by ABeautifulPlaceInThe View Post
That was me. >>>Here

Where are the scare tactics? I am stating technical facts, please reread the part about commercial products that decrypt https on the fly.

Again let me point you to Kapersky regarding the risks & mitigation: https://usa.kaspersky.com/internet-s...lic-wifi-risks
My reading of your tone implies to me that you're suggesting this is an imminent risk to everyone. I agree that a risk exists, but in reality it's a risk that will never manifest into being for the majority of people using the lounges - after all, how many people have had this happen so far as a percentage of those using the lounges? If people apply some common sense then they reduce their likelihood of attack yet further.

A VPN will not provide the ultimate protection you are claiming and it is wrong to imply a single tool will protect someone if they're not fully conversant in the nature of the threat and the protection that the VPN will offer. There are no absolutes in computer security as it is a very complex area. This is basic textbook stuff that any CISO would agree with.

That is the point I am trying to make, on which note I will bow out of this element of the discussion as this is now waaaay off topic.

My advice to anyone concerned would be to discuss concerns with a security expert (perhaps at work if using work equipment) so that you understand the problem and the risks and can make an informed decision on the best remedy. Don't just buy a VPN off the back of this discussion without understanding what you're doing as you risk making a mistake in implementation which leaves you vulnerable. The most dangerous position to be in is one where you think you're protected but are actually vulnerable as in this situation you're likely to let your guard down and leave yourself most open to attack.
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Old Mar 16, 16, 2:23 am
  #34  
 
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Is it bad that at first glance I thought this was a reference to the Financial Times website?
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Old Mar 16, 16, 3:06 am
  #35  
 
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It is more or less normal that BA blocks sites which are not 100% guaranteed in favour of BA and which are beyond their control. An argument used a lot in FT threads and in favour of BA blocking FT: in Turkey much more sites are blocked by the government (in other words : it is worse elsewhere).
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Old Mar 16, 16, 5:23 am
  #36  
 
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Originally Posted by Bazz16202 View Post
Is it bad that at first glance I thought this was a reference to the Financial Times website?
Glad I wasn't the only one.


No FT...no comment.
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Old Mar 16, 16, 6:09 am
  #37  
 
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Originally Posted by vibguy View Post
It is more or less normal that BA blocks sites which are not 100% guaranteed in favour of BA and which are beyond their control. An argument used a lot in FT threads and in favour of BA blocking FT: in Turkey much more sites are blocked by the government (in other words : it is worse elsewhere).
Is this meant to be sarcasm? I hardly think BA would promote the Daily Mail of all papers if they were actively censoring anti-BA stories!
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Old Mar 16, 16, 6:49 am
  #38  
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The blocking can also be due to the noxious ads that pops up on FT regularly. Several users reported that their work now blocked FT due specifically to that. More info are in the technical support and feedback forum.
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Old Mar 16, 16, 7:42 am
  #39  
 
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I have fed back to the ISP and also complained to BA.

I would encourage everyone on this forum to do the same.

Text of my complaint:

I tried to access www.flyertalk.com over WiFi in the First Lounge this morning, only to see a message that the website has been blocked.

I understand that this is a policy decision rather than a technical issue.

There are absolutely NO grounds for blocking FlyerTalk, which is a legitimate site invaluable for frequent flyers such as myself. The blocking of this site reflects poorly on the BA brand.

Please reconsider this decision as a matter of urgency.
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Old Mar 16, 16, 8:08 am
  #40  
 
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Originally Posted by OverTheHorizon View Post
I have fed back to the ISP and also complained to BA.

I would encourage everyone on this forum to do the same.

Text of my complaint:

I tried to access www.flyertalk.com over WiFi in the First Lounge this morning, only to see a message that the website has been blocked.

I understand that this is a policy decision rather than a technical issue.

There are absolutely NO grounds for blocking FlyerTalk, which is a legitimate site invaluable for frequent flyers such as myself. The blocking of this site reflects poorly on the BA brand.

Please reconsider this decision as a matter of urgency.
When I worked in a customer service role, there was nothing that irritated me more than a customer either citing a non-existent law or insisting on nefarious intent when there was none...
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Old Mar 16, 16, 8:17 am
  #41  
 
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Originally Posted by callum9999 View Post
When I worked in a customer service role, there was nothing that irritated me more than a customer either citing a non-existent law or insisting on nefarious intent when there was none...
Can't detect either of those in the post above - care to elaborate ??
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Old Mar 16, 16, 10:05 am
  #42  
 
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Originally Posted by k_getchell View Post
My reading of your tone implies to me that you're suggesting this is an imminent risk to everyone. I agree that a risk exists, but in reality it's a risk that will never manifest into being for the majority of people using the lounges - after all, how many people have had this happen so far as a percentage of those using the lounges? If people apply some common sense then they reduce their likelihood of attack yet further.

A VPN will not provide the ultimate protection you are claiming and it is wrong to imply a single tool will protect someone if they're not fully conversant in the nature of the threat and the protection that the VPN will offer. There are no absolutes in computer security as it is a very complex area. This is basic textbook stuff that any CISO would agree with.

That is the point I am trying to make, on which note I will bow out of this element of the discussion as this is now waaaay off topic.

My advice to anyone concerned would be to discuss concerns with a security expert (perhaps at work if using work equipment) so that you understand the problem and the risks and can make an informed decision on the best remedy. Don't just buy a VPN off the back of this discussion without understanding what you're doing as you risk making a mistake in implementation which leaves you vulnerable. The most dangerous position to be in is one where you think you're protected but are actually vulnerable as in this situation you're likely to let your guard down and leave yourself most open to attack.

I did not say this; again, this is what I said:

A level of security and usability is always a compromise and using a firewall/VPN/Security Patched OS combination in an accessible form to the average person is what we should aim for.
If my link to Kapersky regarding VPNs is not good enough for you how about F-Secure: http://safeandsavvy.f-secure.com/201...f-public-wifi/

Public WiFi is NOT secure or safe. But we’re not saying don’t use it, we’re saying don’t use it without proper security. A good VPN will provide encryption so even if someone tries, they can’t tap into your data.
A good number of open wi-fi providers take the time to tell you in their T&C that there are inherent risks with wireless communications and suggest using a VPN,” Sullivan says. “So if you don’t take it from me, take it from them.
Or Symantec: https://us.norton.com/dangers-of-public-wifi/

Use a VPN (virtual private network). VPNs create a network-within-a-network solution to keep everything you do on public Wi-Fi private. Even on a password-protected network, people can still intercept the signal. VPNs can help make you invisible, allowing you to check sites without worry.
How about Europol on the risks: http://www.welivesecurity.com/2014/1...ts-know-risks/

Earlier this year, Oerting, the head of Europe’s Europol Cyber Crime division, warned that free hotspots were increasingly used to steal private information from consumers in Europe, as reported by We Live Security here. Oerting said, “We have seen an increase in the misuse of Wi-Fi in order to steal information, identity or passwords and money from the users who use public or insecure wi-fi connections.”
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Old Mar 16, 16, 10:19 am
  #43  
 
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For those of you that do not have access to a Corporate CISO

For laptops I would recommend the following as a minimum. Fondleslabs & phones follow the same rule of thumb, but do your research with the likes of Kapersky, Symantec, F-Secure and of course the manufacturer.


  • Make sure you are using an operating system that is still supported by the vendor. (Looking at you, people still using XP)
  • Ensure that all OS updates & security patches are up to date.
  • Disable any OS services that present a security risk or that you are not using.
  • Use an OS password (Sounds obvious but many do not). Make sure it has high entropy.
  • Use filesystem encrytion. Bitlocker for Windows. (File Vault for OS X)
  • Install a firewall, as a minimum use the OS' built in firewall.
  • Install an anti-virus, I use Bitdefender Antivirus Plus 2016. (Don't believe that Macs are immune to virus', Avira is the flavour of choice at the moment)
  • Install a malware scanner, I am partial to Malwarebytes.
  • Use a VPN from a trusted source, as a minimum browser based, preferably network level, I use Cisco AnyConnect Secure Mobility Solution, but appreciate that is a resource not available to all.
  • Make sure your browser is always updated to the latest version.
  • Ensure Flash and Java are disabled.
  • Install EFF's HTTPS Everywhere.
  • Install EFF's Privacy Badger.
  • (Whitelist FlyerTalk ) - Edit.
  • Now, use common sense, for example do not ignore any security warnings because they are getting in your way, only ignore their recommendations if you truly know what you are doing.
  • Be mindful of physical security, never leave device unattended.
  • Shield your passwords & credentials, with a simple smartphone the camera can be zoomed in across a lounge to observe (and record) your screen & keyboard. Consider a privacy screen.

Last edited by ABeautifulPlaceInThe; Mar 16, 16 at 10:50 am
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Old Mar 16, 16, 10:38 am
  #44  
 
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Originally Posted by ABeautifulPlaceInThe View Post
For laptops I would recommend the following as a minimum. Fondleslabs & phones follow the same rule of thumb, but do your research with the likes of Kapersky, Symantec, F-Secure and of course the manufacturer.


  • Make sure you are using an operating system that is still supported by the vendor. (Looking at you, people still using XP)
  • Ensure that all OS updates & security patches are up to date.
  • Disable any OS services that present a security risk or that you are not using.
  • Use an OS password (Sounds obvious but many do not). Make sure it has high entropy.
  • Use filesystem encrytion. Bitlocker for Windows. (File Vault for OS X)
  • Install a firewall, as a minimum use the OS' built in firewall.
  • Install an anti-virus, I use Bitdefender Antivirus Plus 2016. (Don't believe that Macs are immune to virus', Avira is the flavour of choice at the moment)
  • Install a malware scanner, I am partial to Malwarebytes.
  • Use a VPN from a trusted source, as a minimum browser based, preferably network level, I use Cisco AnyConnect Secure Mobility Solution, but appreciate that is a resource not available to all.
  • Make sure your browser is always updated to the latest version.
  • Ensure Flash and Java are disabled.
  • Install EFF's HTTPS Everywhere.
  • Install EFF's Privacy Badger.
  • If ads annoy you, consider uBlock Origin
  • Now, use common sense, for example do not ignore any security warnings because they are getting in your way, only ignore their recommendations if you truly know what you are doing.
  • Be mindful of physical security, never leave device unattended.
  • Shield your passwords & credentials, with a simple smartphone the camera can be zoomed in across a lounge to observe (and record) your screen & keyboard. Consider a privacy screen.
This is all very nice, but I don't think that 99% of computer users would know what you are talking about with Bitlocker and Privacy Badgers, etc... Or most of the other stuff after XP.

Oh, and you're not allowed to recommend Ad Blockers on FT .
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Old Mar 16, 16, 10:44 am
  #45  
 
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Originally Posted by fransknorge View Post
The blocking can also be due to the noxious ads that pops up on FT regularly. Several users reported that their work now blocked FT due specifically to that. More info are in the technical support and feedback forum.

I doubt that flyertalk.com is intentionally blocked, more likely an effect of some automatic trigger and false alarm. This isn't the first time flyertalk.com is blocked, I have experienced it a few years ago in F-lounge.

Just report it and let the IT-people adjust whatever system is involved.
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