Multi-leg booking. At once or separately.

Old Mar 17, 14, 5:26 pm
  #1  
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Multi-leg booking. At once or separately.

Hi all,

Never flown with BA before (I generally don't fly much as it is), and had a question.

I would like to book YYZ->LHR, stay in England for a couple days, then fly LHR->CDG, spend a few days in Paris, then eventually fly back to Toronto on British Airways. To get back from Paris, it's CDG->LHR->YYZ.

I would like to book separately so round trip YYZ-LHR and round trip LHR-CDG because it's about $600 cheaper.

Obviously if I book all in one go and I miss my connection in LHR the airline will put me on the next flight. If I book them separately will it still be treated this way, or will I be out of luck much like if my car breaks down on the way to the airport and I don't make it there on time.

Thanks for any help!
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Old Mar 17, 14, 6:36 pm
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They could help, especially if both flights are on the same airline (like in this case). They are under no obligation to, but they usually will. I'd have a longer than usual connection though.

Oh, and consider booking YYZ-LHR-YYZ, CDG-LHR, and the Eurostar London-Paris, it may be cheaper and if you are staying in Central/North London and in central Paris much more convenient
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Old Mar 17, 14, 6:37 pm
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Originally Posted by xero9 View Post
I would like to book YYZ->LHR, stay in England for a couple days, then fly LHR->CDG, spend a few days in Paris, then eventually fly back to Toronto on British Airways. To get back from Paris, it's CDG->LHR->YYZ.

I would like to book separately so round trip YYZ-LHR and round trip LHR-CDG because it's about $600 cheaper.

Obviously if I book all in one go and I miss my connection in LHR the airline will put me on the next flight. If I book them separately will it still be treated this way, or will I be out of luck much like if my car breaks down on the way to the airport and I don't make it there on time.
If CDG-LHR and LHR-YYZ are both on BA, then you will probably be fine (and get reaccommodated) if the reason that you miss LHR-YYZ is that CDG-LHR is late. However, if that happens, don't expect more than being reaccommodated; you won't necessarily get your hotel paid for if you're delayed overnight, whereas you would if you were on a through booking.

One possible compromise is to book YYZ-LHR and then CDG-LHR-YYZ on one ticket, and book a one-way LHR-CDG (which, on your plans, might just as well be on a separate ticket as you have nothing to gain from it being on the same ticket).

Another idea - and a much better one if you're travelling from central London to central Paris - is to take the Eurostar train from London to Paris. If you're travelling city centre to city centre, it's almost madness to hoof out to an airport to fly.
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Old Mar 17, 14, 7:11 pm
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Eurostar is indeed a smart idea for centre to centre.

Also, since I presume you are going in Y, try to get the 787 service from/to YYZ.
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Old Mar 17, 14, 7:14 pm
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Since you plan to spend several days in England before going on to Paris! it makes much more sense to take the Eurostar. Much more pleasant and probably cheaper, especially if you book well in advance to get good fares.
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Old Mar 17, 14, 7:34 pm
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Multi-leg booking. At once or separately.

I've done both flying and Eurostar from London and Paris. I would recommend Eurostar there if you are leaving from London and if you are connecting straight back from Paris go ORY to LHR to YYZ.
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Old Mar 17, 14, 9:19 pm
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Wow, thanks for all the responses guys! Some good recommendations here for sure!

I had looked into the Eurostar to get to and from Paris, but I found the price to be more expensive than flying (and it's longer, I believe, though that might be rendered moot depending on how early I want to check in to Heathrow :P). One major consideration I had with flying over Eurostar was I plan on renting a car, even though we're going to return to London each night (and will pay dearly for parking I'm sure). It just seemed easier to return the car back to Heathrow.

Globaliser, that's actually a really good idea that I hadn't considered. One thing I noticed with BA is that if I pick premium economy on their 787 going to LHR, the fare for the return ticket jumps! Would be nice to fly at least one direction in premium economy would be nice, and this might let me do that without paying more to come home.

Thanks again all. You guys are helpful!
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Old Mar 18, 14, 12:26 am
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Theoretically your all in one ticket should be cheaper since if your return service involves a stay in London of less than 24 hours you avoid APD, a government tax. This perhaps explains your penultimate paragraph. If you can't see a reasonable fare online it may be worth having a BAEC agent look at it, they may come up with something.

City centre to city centre the train is almost certain to be quicker than flying since you can turn up 10 minutes before departure, or 30 minutes allegedly in Economy. However depending on the time of day that you'll be on the road, if you are renting a car and driving to the hotel in London each night (which is very brave of you) then you may want one outside the centre due to the congestion charge.
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Old Mar 18, 14, 3:29 am
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xero9, good luck with your trip. I think Globaliser's advice is spot on.

I don't know whether you've visited or driven in London or similar cities before, but you should be aware that driving in London is a very different experience from driving in Toronto (I have lived in Toronto), from the point of view of both the volume and aggression of the traffic, as well as the confusing road layout (not a grid like Toronto). That's without mentioning driving on the left!

It seems you want to drive outside of London, so if I were you I'd plan to stay somewhere on the outskirts. You can then drive more easily to wherever you plan to visit and, if you want to visit the centre, do so by public transport. The tube (subway) and train system are widespread and easy to use.

You'll probably respond now and tell me you've visited many times, in which case ignore the above!
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Old Mar 18, 14, 8:35 am
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corporate-wage-slave, I hadn't even considered the travel time from the hotel to LHR, then from CDG to our Paris hotel. This is certainly making the Eurostar seem more attractive at this point.

Corpt, I've NEVER been to London, England, Europe, or anywhere outside of the Eastern time zone for that matter! My plan for London was to rent a car at Heathrow and drive to the hotel and have it parked for most the time (I know it seems like a waste), taking it out only on the days we were leaving the city. Now you have me worried, haha.

I know this moving away from the original topic and may be moved to the UK forums, but I came up with three ways to get to and from the airport:

Rental Car
Pros: Faster(?), around the same cost as a taxi, ease of taking luggage, and will need one anyway
Cons: Dealing with traffic, parking.

Tube
Pros: Cheapest
Cons: Hauling luggage, slow (according to Google Maps)

Taxi
Pros: No car to worry about
Cons: Round trip is estimated to be more than it would cost to park a car the entire time we're there.

You guys have certainly given me a lot to consider.
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Old Mar 18, 14, 8:45 am
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Originally Posted by xero9 View Post
My plan for London was to rent a car at Heathrow and drive to the hotel and have it parked for most the time (I know it seems like a waste), taking it out only on the days we were leaving the city. Now you have me worried, haha.
Don't forget you also have to pay London congestion charge if you drive the car anywhere in central London zone on weekdays before 6pm. And it's 10 per day.
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Old Mar 18, 14, 8:48 am
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Originally Posted by xero9 View Post
Corpt, I've NEVER been to London, England, Europe, or anywhere outside of the Eastern time zone for that matter! My plan for London was to rent a car at Heathrow and drive to the hotel and have it parked for most the time (I know it seems like a waste), taking it out only on the days we were leaving the city. Now you have me worried, haha.
Unlike in North America and South Africa, the default in NW Europe is not to hire a car. I think I've done it about twice in my life in NW Europe and I travel a fair bit around that patch. Public transport is quite efficient on the whole. But a lot depends on where you are wanting to travel to in the London area. Certainly if you were going to a number of isolated rural locations then I can see the case, and indeed you may as well get a hotel not right in the centre to reduce the parking and congestion tax. If it's the Stratford upon Avon, Stonehenge and Oxford then definitely don't do it!

But by all means give us a few more details, I'm sure we will come up with some good ideas.
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Old Mar 18, 14, 8:48 am
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Originally Posted by xero9 View Post
Taxi
Pros: No car to worry about
Cons: Round trip is estimated to be more than it would cost to park a car the entire time we're there.
For CABS to/from airport to hotel check out something like http://www.minicabster.co.uk. You should get a pretty decent quote from the many cab companies it checks.
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Old Mar 18, 14, 9:10 am
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I suppose it all depends on what you are planning to do in London. Are you intending to see the main sights? Or do you have ideas for things that are out of town and off the typical tourist trail?

A car is not the easy or inexpensive option if you plan to stay in London. It's rather different driving over here compared with the US, with the non-grid road system, unfamiliar signposting, driving a stick shift on the left and the heavy traffic combined with difficult/expensive parking.
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Old Mar 18, 14, 9:25 am
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You may wish to consider Zip Car (which seems to exist in Toronto as well). You'll need to check the terms to make sure you can join, but if you have an American "or reciprocal" driving license it seems to be OK.

Not only is the cost of the congestion charge in central London included, but relatives have also found it useful for getting the train out of London, renting a Zipcar when they get to Oxford/Cambridge and then driving to their ultimate destination from there. Getting out of London in a car can take a significant amount of time (obviously depending on where you start/finish!).
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