any club seats less "turbulent" than others?

Old Jan 27, 11, 2:49 pm
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any club seats less "turbulent" than others?

Being a white-knuckle flyer (I'm more or less ok on smooth flights), I'm wondering if any of the club seats on BA 777 (Phila-Heathrow) are more or less susceptible to turbulence than others. Still trying to decide whether to splurge on Club, but if we do, I want to try to get the best-bet seats for us.

Also: How do I locate my recent posts other than scrolling down through the list?

Thanks!
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Old Jan 27, 11, 3:04 pm
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Originally Posted by pease View Post
Being a white-knuckle flyer (I'm more or less ok on smooth flights), I'm wondering if any of the club seats on BA 777 (Phila-Heathrow) are more or less susceptible to turbulence than others. Still trying to decide whether to splurge on Club, but if we do, I want to try to get the best-bet seats for us.

Also: How do I locate my recent posts other than scrolling down through the list?

Thanks!
CW on the 777 is situated pretty much over the wings so technically that's the steadiest part of the plane. Even so, I don't have any insight as to whether the middle seats or window seats are any steadier

It's not an immensely 'choppy' route AFAIK.

From personal experience, PHL tends to get the non-AVOD 777s. I would worry more about the crappy IFE if I were you.
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Old Jan 27, 11, 3:40 pm
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I read somewhere that turbulence is less the further forward you sit (or is that something to do with the champagne available?).

Seriously though, I used to be nervous of turbulence, but of late two things have helped:

1) Generally flying in Club upwards: I am sure that the bed positions lessens the impact of the bouncing. On a recent EZE - LHR flight it got (which I gather is common) very bumpy over the Equator, but being able to lie down and stretch out really made it noticeably better. For that reason, yes - upgrade! Go Club.

2) Someone once remarked to me that think of what used to fly this route - an old Vickers something-or-other? They probably struggled to cut through the cloud, and still made it to the destination more often than not. Seriously, planes are so marvellous that you can't help but feel safe.

On another note, I really do marvel at nature when we hit turbulence these days; it's a bit inconvenient, but nothing more than that.

Try to enjoy, there is much to appreciated in CW.

M
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Old Jan 27, 11, 3:49 pm
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BA could not guarantee the lack of turbulence in F, as pointed out by one of the best posts on this forum

http://www.flyertalk.com/forum/briti...erience-f.html


On a serious note, you will get turbulence no matter where you sit. It makes absolutely no difference what so ever. The only difference will be how squidgy the seat is.

Phil-LHR will use the Polar Jetstream which can give turbulence, but 99% of the time will not, you will only get light chop. This is because aircraft these days fly at around 38,000ft which on the flight from the US to the UK, is above the height where you will get any weather (called the Tropapause, which at 50deg north is around 34,000ft).

The reason for bad turbulence coming from South America is that there are large updrafts caused by the hot moist air from the Atlantic and thunderstorms are quite frequent. The Tropapause is also much higher at the equator (around 46,000ft), so there are more clouds and storms for planes to avoid (or in the case of Air France, not avoid).
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Old Jan 27, 11, 3:50 pm
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Originally Posted by globalste View Post
BA could not guarantee the lack of turbulence in F, as pointed out by one of the best posts on this forum

http://www.flyertalk.com/forum/briti...erience-f.html
I remember that shocking story. I sometimes still break out in a cold sweat just thinking about it. But me, I love turbulence. It helps me sleep.
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Old Jan 27, 11, 3:52 pm
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The galley right at the back of the 777, next stop the tail, is a great place to be when you go through turbulence. Very bumpy down the back.

218
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Old Jan 27, 11, 3:55 pm
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Do people really believe that if a plane is being tossed about in turbulence, that there are parts of the plane less affected than others?

It's not quite the same as a bus passing over a hump-backed bridge, after all.
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Old Jan 27, 11, 3:59 pm
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now its the lightning you want to be worried about...

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Old Jan 27, 11, 4:10 pm
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Originally Posted by irishguy28 View Post
Do people really believe that if a plane is being tossed about in turbulence, that there are parts of the plane less affected than others?
There definitely are places where the AC moves less. In terms of yaw, pitch and roll the area immediately in front of the wing is least 'mobile'.

Unfortunately this could be in CW or WT+ depending on 777/747 (and on the specific configuration of these). I'd rather trade in the extra movement for the better package in the nose though
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Old Jan 27, 11, 4:18 pm
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OK - I'm not saying that the entire body of the plane remains completely rigid during the exercise - but the "bounce" in the plane, compared to the (in extreme cases) hundreds of feet/metres that the plane drops through in a very short period, means that the "difference" is hardly worthy of notice. What's a few (tens of) centimetres when you're talking about tens (or hundreds) of metres?

I just get the impression that a lot of people have a complete misconception of what actually happens during severe turbulence. In these cases, it doesn't really matter where you are sitting. Just pray that you're strapped in!
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Old Jan 27, 11, 4:30 pm
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Thanks to a most excellent vegetable curry in the T5 lounge there was quite a lot of trouser turbulence in Club World last time I flew LHR-BOS...
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Old Jan 27, 11, 4:32 pm
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Originally Posted by irishguy28 View Post
I just get the impression that a lot of people have a complete misconception of what actually happens during severe turbulence. In these cases, it doesn't really matter where you are sitting. Just pray that you're strapped in!
Severe turbulence is extremely, extremely rare. Even pilots sh!t their pants during severe turbulence. What pax call severe is actually called moderate and so on. Moderate turbulence is already enough for the crew to secure the trolleys and themselves.

What most pax think is moderate is more like a mild chop...

I cured my mother from her 'fear' of turbulence completely by explaining to her that is was like a boat on water and sometimes you have some waves, etc. She loves boats so she is all happy now.
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Old Jan 27, 11, 4:37 pm
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Originally Posted by badoc View Post
There definitely are places where the AC moves less. In terms of yaw, pitch and roll the area immediately in front of the wing is least 'mobile'.
I agree, though think it's the difference between slight movement and turbulence. The back of the plane has a lot more movement than the wings and nose IMHO, so smoother away from the back. But when it's turbulent, i.e choppy movements up and down I don't think where you are would make much difference.
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Old Jan 27, 11, 4:47 pm
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Best place to be is as near to the nose as possible....so I was told.
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Old Jan 27, 11, 4:53 pm
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I have heard the 777 has a nauseating yaw (I believe) at the back of the plane that some people are extremely sensitive to and some people don't even notice. Not sure if it an old wives' tale though...
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