Grrrr - What happened to British Civility?

Old Aug 17, 10, 4:06 pm
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Grrrr - What happened to British Civility?

Following on from "Do BA have the best behaved passengers" thread, I was going to give this thread "Do BA have the rudest staff", but I realised it was not specific to BA staff.

I just landed at Heathrow from Manchester, and went to the bus station to get the 423 to Bath Road.

There were about 10 people in the queue - a typical, civilised British queue with a start and an end.

As the bus pulled in, about 15 T5 staff moved in from all sides. Not to the end of the queue, but to the front. They formed a mob that pushed their way onto the bus. The people at the front (I think were American) were a bit bemused, but didn't say anything. By the time I got on, there were no seats (not that I would have sat down anyway, it was the principal).

I was absolutely livid - and had to hold my tongue to avoid making a spectacle of myself once I got on.

Now, at least 3 of these people were in BA uniform. Others had the green BAA uniform, and a few others from shops and restaurants.

Now, I'm reluctant to post this as it'll probably get me banned. Anyway, every single one of these people were of Asian descent, so no doubt this is acceptable behaviour in their culture.

How long before this spreads to general British society - and we all end up accepting this as normal?

Yours,
Daily Mail Reader
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Old Aug 17, 10, 4:19 pm
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I too dislike bad manners and I readily agree that civility to strangers is a rapidly disappearing commodity. I hope, though, that you aren't suggesting that what you call British civility is the exclusive preserve of white British people? Such a suggestion would be rather uncivilised, though not, sadly, un-'British'.
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Old Aug 17, 10, 4:20 pm
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I'm afraid I noticed the same 'downgrading' of civility (and consideration towards others) in the UK. I like the 'old-fashioned' British queuing customs and civility, but sadly I feel they are being diluted by those who do not subscribe to those "old British ways", the Caucasian people included (including the English, American, Australian etc), so not just specific to any races.

To me, respect towards and preservation of their ways where-ever I go is important. For instance, while I do not agree with the concept of wearing a burka myself if I go to a country where women are expected to wear them, out of respect to their way. I'd quietly queue and stand on the right of an escalator if I am in England even though we stand on the left on an escalator here and queue barging is almost a national pastime here (but then again I'm not a native of here). At the same time, I join the queue barging here, or I'd be right at the back of everything, even with a bit of personal difficulty because I actually do not like queue barging!

As for those from outside the UK, we say "when in Rome" but unfortunately, not everyone takes this view and some people bring the way they do things to the country to which they visit or move, or the parents do not teach children the way things are done in the country in which they are born. And those brought up within the UK, I think they are ignoring the traditional civility and considerations that used to be deemed important.

I do not think it's a race thing though. It's how they are brought up, taught and above all, how they decide to behave.
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Old Aug 17, 10, 4:22 pm
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It's a London thing.

You lot in Manchester get the best fish and chips, even more rain than us and slappers in short skirts in February...

We Londoners get over priced everything, free 30 minute cycle hire and people that ignore Bus Q's...

I doubt that the ethnicity of the staff had anything to do with it... any more than their employer... as don't you have Q jumping 'Asians' and Rude BA Staff up there as well?
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Old Aug 17, 10, 4:25 pm
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Originally Posted by BA235 View Post
I too dislike bad manners and I readily agree that civility to strangers is a rapidly disappearing commodity. I hope, though, that you aren't suggesting that what you call British civility is the exclusive preserve of white British people? Such a suggestion would be rather uncivilised, though not, sadly, un-'British'.
Definitely not. We'll leave the White Brits to their ASBO's thank you very much! Thinking about it more rationally now I'm calming down - I think I'd prefer queue jumpers than getting my head caved in by a mob of thugs in Slough.

Cheers,
Rick
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Old Aug 17, 10, 4:29 pm
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Originally Posted by Gumbieben View Post
and slappers in short skirts in February...
This isn't appropriate language for this board is it ?
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Old Aug 17, 10, 4:30 pm
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Originally Posted by Gumbieben View Post
I doubt that the ethnicity of the staff had anything to do with it... any more than their employer... as don't you have Q jumping 'Asians' and Rude BA Staff up there as well?
Never noticed it up here to be honest. We don't have any BA staff for a start

I'd be more inclined to say something in my own town - and it's never happened as far as I can recall.

Cheers,
Rick
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Old Aug 17, 10, 4:30 pm
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Originally Posted by PaulN View Post
This isn't appropriate language for this board is it ?
What, February?
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Old Aug 17, 10, 4:31 pm
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Originally Posted by DYKWIA View Post
I think I'd prefer queue jumpers than getting my head caved in by a mob of thugs in Slough.
Talking of Slough, why is it so rough there?
When staying at a LHR hotel, I went shopping at a large Tesco in search of a UK multi-adapter and I found the area rather rough.
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Old Aug 17, 10, 4:34 pm
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Originally Posted by LTN Phobia View Post
Talking of Slough, why is it so rough there?
When staying at a LHR hotel, I went shopping at a large Tesco in search of a UK multi-adapter and I found the area rather rough.
Yep - I had the pleasure of staying there a few weeks ago (Holiday Inn Express) as all the Heathrow hotels were booked up. Walking through the town centre at 7pm was quite unnerving. Gangs of lads on bikes - probably not intent on anything, but made me a bit wary.
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Old Aug 17, 10, 4:34 pm
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I must say as someone who uses a bus in London on an almost daily basis that orderly queues are very rare indeed. Buses are so crowded and people know if they do try and queue orderly their politeness is not going to be rewarded when loads of people barge to the front. Also with the frequency of buses in London you can easily find the bus you want to have to stop behind another bus so if you stand in line by the stop then you'll be the last on.

Oddly enough I remember in Edinburgh the bus drivers would never let pax on until they reached the actual bus stop, so if there was another bus there you'd have to wait for it to move off. Good for those queueing but does slow things down.

In Newcastle the drivers would tend to open their door stopped behind the other bus (like in London) but there's not a mad dash for the door and people try and more or less stay in order (although it's a long time since I've used a bus in Newcastle so manners may have gone downhill here too).
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Old Aug 17, 10, 4:37 pm
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an aged American question

continuing the topic.

In the States we drive on the right and pass on the left. I don't know if it is unconcious or what but when ambulating (British influence), on a sidewalk or riding an escalator I carry that pattern on; walk right pass left, slow traffic right.

My quandry has been, since my first visit to London, where I do not drived and have not driven. I am never sure if I should walk on the left or right of a walkway. What side should I take going up an Underground stairway?
This is in all seriousness.

ralph
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Old Aug 17, 10, 4:39 pm
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Originally Posted by DYKWIA View Post
Walking through the town centre at 7pm was quite unnerving. Gangs of lads on bikes - probably not intent on anything, but made me a bit wary.
Indeed, I found 'gangs' of youths a bit unnerving too.

Going back to the bus manners, when the bus stops short of the bus stop and I end up being closer to the bus than those who were queuing before me, I step aside and do the "after you" thing until the people who were there before me had got on. I get really dirty look from people who were behind me as I guess I block them from getting on before me, but I cannot bring myself to queue jump in the UK even though perhaps I should in this circumstance.

Am I doing the right thing in giving way to those who were in the queue before me?



I recently had to catch a 'normal' train from London. There was a fairly large woman who was occupying an aisle seat, with facing seats also taken (she was fully able-bodied as it became evident when she got off the train). There was hardly any seat left in the carriage but the window seat next to her was vacant. I thought it was rude of her not to move to the window seat knowing full well people could not reach the window seat with her being in the aisle seat. She was middle-aged, fairly clearly locally grown one. I think too many native English people have stopped having consideration towards others, too.
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Old Aug 17, 10, 4:40 pm
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Originally Posted by rxralph View Post
My quandry has been, since my first visit to London, where I do not drived and have not driven. I am never sure if I should walk on the left or right of a walkway. What side should I take going up an Underground stairway?
This is in all seriousness.

ralph
Escalators is always walk on the left and stand on the right. Passageways generally seem to be the seem (except for some where signs say otherwise like between the two ticket halls at Victoria.
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Old Aug 17, 10, 4:42 pm
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Originally Posted by rxralph View Post
In the States we drive on the right and pass on the left.
You've got to kidding

As a NJ regular, passing takes place anywhere there is 100 yards of space. Left, right, both. It's a nightmare!
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