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Real Zika risk in Rio in the Winter

Real Zika risk in Rio in the Winter

Old Jun 3, 16, 5:30 pm
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Real Zika risk in Rio in the Winter

Going to Rio in early July for 3 day

I'm a dude but in the baby-making phase of my life.

All I'm doing is hotel / morning run / beach.

What's the real risk of contracting zika in the winter, in densely populated Rio?

Last edited by shuuy; Jun 5, 16 at 12:12 pm
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Old Jun 3, 16, 8:33 pm
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Dude, first of all, nobody has calculated the "real risk" for contacting Zika in Rio (by the way, the beaches are not so densely populated in the winter). Then, with what you describe as your daily activities, one could say that the risk is low: There should (whatever that means) be fewer aedine mossies close to the beach; they will have fewer chances of biting, as you'll be running, and then it seems that you'll be spending the rest of the day in the hotel (watching tv?).

Not being in position to bring the chances down to zero, the only alternative that you have, in addition to cancelling this strange three-day stay in Rio (can't you have the planned activities in Sydney?) or to refraining from sex for 8 weeks, is to get tested for anti-Zika antibodies after your return home. Of course you'll have to refrain from baby-producing sex as well (given we're in FT, I won't elaborate on other alternatives), but if negative, you can start your attempts to spreading your genes much earlier.

Take all of the above from a medic who's been working on tropical diseases for decades. The most important piece of advice is to proactively lower your risk, e.g through the usage of repellants or clothing or by avoiding certain places or all of that...
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Old Jun 4, 16, 1:07 pm
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Originally Posted by shuuy View Post
But trying to have a baby with a ladyfriend and don't want to wait 8 weeks for the sexy time.
Know you can pass the zika s*** on.
The real risk, even if it 1%, is a "you shouldn't even have to ask" when the ramifications are a deformed baby needing a lifetime of specialized medical care, not to mention possible Guillian Barre or other malady for you and your ladyfriend. Not spreading your seed for 8 weeks would seem to be a minor hardship, so to speak.
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Old Jun 5, 16, 12:11 pm
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Thanks all. Proactive management + testing + when home + waiting
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Old Jun 5, 16, 11:05 pm
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I just got back from Rio, spent 1 week. I was also there in April for 1 week as well. ... I was also in Sao Paulo, JAN, FEB and MARCH for 1 week, I did not see one bug on all trips. In the urban areas which includes the touristy beach area of Rio bug eradication has been pretty successful.

In Rio I stayed in Barra da Tijuca and every evening you could see the bug bombs going off in the nearby forrest, you could also smell it in the early evening... smelled like a camp ground.

If you were going hiking in the forrest outside the city I would worry, but in urban areas, Sao Paulo and Rio... an encounter with a mosquito would be rare... like I said in the 5 weeks I've spent in Brazil I did not see 1 bug.

Originally Posted by shuuy View Post
Going to Rio in early July for 3 day

I'm a dude but in the baby-making phase of my life.

All I'm doing is hotel / morning run / beach.

What's the real risk of contracting zika in the winter, in densely populated Rio?
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Old Jun 6, 16, 3:19 am
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Originally Posted by Radiant Flyer View Post
I just got back from Rio, spent 1 week. I was also there in April for 1 week as well. ... I was also in Sao Paulo, JAN, FEB and MARCH for 1 week, I did not see one bug on all trips. In the urban areas which includes the touristy beach area of Rio bug eradication has been pretty successful.

In Rio I stayed in Barra da Tijuca and every evening you could see the bug bombs going off in the nearby forrest, you could also smell it in the early evening... smelled like a camp ground.

If you were going hiking in the forrest outside the city I would worry, but in urban areas, Sao Paulo and Rio... an encounter with a mosquito would be rare... like I said in the 5 weeks I've spent in Brazil I did not see 1 bug.
What was your experience like when returning to the US at immigration/customs? Any extra procedures like being pulled aside, etc?
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Old Jun 7, 16, 12:00 am
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The flights from Brazil get treated like any other flight.

The bug bombing of forested areas in populated areas has been going on for years, not only in Brazil but also in Asia and other tropical areas around the world. If they did not do this you would be eaten alive by bugs. I walked all over RIO and Sao Paulo, hung out at the beach and watched the sunsets, no flies, no moths and no mosquitos.

When you get there you will realize it's not as bad as the media portrays it to be. From what I could see there is no mosquito problem in urban areas.

Originally Posted by SkyTeam777 View Post
What was your experience like when returning to the US at immigration/customs? Any extra procedures like being pulled aside, etc?

Last edited by Radiant Flyer; Jun 7, 16 at 10:51 am
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Old Jun 7, 16, 7:42 am
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Well, a) they are indeed practicing mosquito control and b) there is a real problem with Aedes spp. mosquitoes, vectors of the Zika virus (and there has been one for many years). You don't really expect to "see" any of that in a metro area of more than 12 million people...

In a few words: Don't panic, but be cautious and responsible!
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Old Jun 7, 16, 5:18 pm
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I wasn't so concerned about Zika, until this week.
CNN interviewed a professor from the #1 medical
school(yes, that one) in this country. He said that
there's no proven method yet to make sure the
Zika is completely out of an infected person's blood. (!)

Call me paranoid, doesn't that mean there is a chance
that the Zika virus can remain in someone's blood
for years? (which means he/she should try to have
a child during all those years until the scientists come
up with a foolproof way to determine the presence
of the virus?)
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Old Jun 7, 16, 7:06 pm
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Originally Posted by Siberian_Viktorya View Post
I wasn't so concerned about Zika, until this week.
CNN interviewed a professor from the #1 medical
school(yes, that one) in this country. He said that
there's no proven method yet to make sure the
Zika is completely out of an infected person's blood. (!)

Call me paranoid, doesn't that mean there is a chance
that the Zika virus can remain in someone's blood
for years? (which means he/she should try to have
a child during all those years until the scientists come
up with a foolproof way to determine the presence
of the virus?)
Again, FT is NOT the forum to discuss medical issues, thus here's only a short (informed) answer without details. With the Zika situation being so recent, how does the distinguished colleague from that University know how long is long, etc.? Let's keep our pants on (also helps for Zika-related, sex-linked health problems)
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Old Jun 7, 16, 7:18 pm
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OP should check the habits of the involved mosquito species and let this inform decisions to run at dawn or dusk.

Is OP really planning to spend all evenings and nights in Rio in a hotel room rather than going out to restaurants and bars, etc.? I'm not sure I believe this.
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Old Jun 27, 16, 6:17 pm
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Originally Posted by KLouis View Post
Well, a) they are indeed practicing mosquito control and b) there is a real problem with Aedes spp. mosquitoes, vectors of the Zika virus (and there has been one for many years). You don't really expect to "see" any of that in a metro area of more than 12 million people...

In a few words: Don't panic, but be cautious and responsible!
Just back from a conference in Botafogo neighbourhood. I don't think I saw 5 mosquitoes during the whole week. I had brought DEET but stopped using it after Day 1. Botafogo is not on the Olympic side of town, but really: bugs were NOT repeat NOT an issue for me last week.
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Old Jun 27, 16, 8:06 pm
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For those going to Rio for the Olympics, here are the latest WHO health recommendations for that event. You'll have to scroll down for Zika.
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Old Jun 28, 16, 9:12 pm
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I think I got bit twice this evening at the outdoor restaurant at Copacabana.
Looks like I'm getting tested when I get home.
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Old Jun 28, 16, 9:57 pm
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The chances that you were bitten by an Aedes mossy in the evening are rather small, most probably this/these was/were Culex ones, thus harmless with respect to Zika. Still, if you had used DEET, you would not have had any problems: your fault!
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