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Brazil Tourist Visa Questions and Answers

Brazil Tourist Visa Questions and Answers

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Old Jun 17, 19, 1:47 am   -   Wikipost
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Starting today (Monday June 17, 2019) tourists with USA (plus Canada and Japan IIRC) passports can enter Brazil for up to 90 days without a visa and can possibly extend their stay to 180 days according to CNN.
Brazil Tourist Visa Questions and Answers
Since November 21, 2017, Brazil has offered the option of online e-visas for Australians to save the visits to Brazil embassies and consulates. Sounds good, any experiences to share?

E-visas will be offered to Americans, Canadians and Japanese as of January, 2018. The e - visas are to be done within 72 hours.

http://www.brazilgovnews.gov.br/news...ns-in-november

https://www.cntraveler.com/story/us-...isas-to-brazil
Brazilian visa questions have been moved to this "sticky" thread, so others can find it and various answers more easily.

A useful tool to determine your visa needs is TIMATIC- Star Alliance helpfully provides access to TIMATIC via this link, with a page you can provide nationality, country of residence, trip origin, destination, etc. to get the same information used by your airline to permit / not allow you to fly. NON-US passport holders can download a PDF document via this page to determine their visa requirements (TIMATIC may be more up to date).

N.B. If you enter Brasil by land be sure to get your entry stamp; failure to do so may result in a fine and penalties. (Art. 125 XVI, c/c Arts. 22 e 24 da Lei n 6.815/80 modificada pela Lei n 6.964/81 punishable with a fine of 413.88 Reals each, ~$190 USD - see post)

Generally, for U S Passport holders (TDS' Brazil Visas page has links, requirements, downloadable forms here.)

The passport (original is required) must:

. . . ● Be valid for the next six months
. . . ● Have at least one blank visa page (amendments and endorsement pages cannot be used to fulfill this requirement)
. . . ● Not be frayed, torn, separating, or altered in any other way

You may be required to provide a copy of your identification / personal information page as well. You may want to scan this as well and send yourself a copy so you can retrieve it form e-mail if your passport is lost, stolen or damaged.

Photograph: ONE color, passport photo is required; must

. . . ● Be printed on photo paper (paper-printed digital photos not accepted)
. . . ● Be two inches by two inches
. . . ● Have a white background
. . . ● Have been taken within the last six months

Proof of Residency in Consular Jurisdiction

A copy of current Driver's License, displaying your residential address, or other legal proof of residency such as a lease or utility bill, is required

Proof of Travel Arrangements

Proof of travel arrangements for the trip duration are requested, including:

. . . ● Include a copy of an itinerary or e-ticket showing entry and exit dates
. . . ● Show the traveler's full name (as printed in his or her passport)
. . . ● Letters of invitation for nonpaid lodging can be useful

Each consulate may have slightly different requirements regarding proof of travel plans. Carefully read the site for the Brazilian Consulate under whose jurisdiction your residence falls.

Note: An itinerary is a printout of reserved RT flights, not a paid ticket.

Note that Brazilian authorities may require proof of financial sufficiency - $150 per day would be considered minimally reasonable, but credit cards often suffice for such proof.

Online Brazil Application (from CBIT)

The Consulate of Brazil has instituted a web-based visa application form. The application must be completed online and can be found at https://scedv.serpro.gov.br/. We cannot process your visa request if you do not complete the application form online. Your completed application must:

. . . ● Include answers for all fields
. . . ● Include your name as it appears in your passport (leave the middle name field of the application form blank if your middle name is not represented in your passport)
. . . ● Include your designated code number which will be issued at the end of the online application process
. . . ● Include your signature as it appears in your passport
. . . ● Be submitted to the consulate within 30 days of completion
. . . ● Be signed inside the LARGE BOX found directly below the place of birth field
. . . ● Be printed and included in your completed (Application Kit)

Some Brazilian Consulates are (as of date of this edit) allowing electronic upload of documents for review, with originals presented at time of interview.

Minor Applicants

Minors under the age of 18 must submit the following documents, all of which must be notarized:

. . . ● The attached Minor Authorization form
. . . ● A notarized letter of consent from both parents or legal guardian
. . . ● The child's birth certificate
. . . ● A copy of both parent's photo IDs
. . . ● If the child has legal guardians, the guardians must provide a notarized legal proof of guardianship.

Fees: United States passport holders: US$ 160.00, charged in reciprocity for an identical fee paid by Brazilian citizens who apply for a tourist visa to the U.S.; $65 Canadians, $35 Australians; no visa needed for U.K. Citizens.

[an additional $20 consular fee is due when the visa applicant is not present in person to submit the visa documents. Must be paid via a U S Postal Money Order (cash, credit cards and checks are not accepted). ]

Some Brazilian Consulates do not accept application packets by mail, only in person. If you or a relative cannot appear in person.... try a visa service if you can not personally make it to a consulate dispensing visas; the office you use must must be in the service area of the Consulate you are required to use (depends on where you live).

List of Brazilian consulates in USA.

Notes:

. . . ● The "must be used within 90 days (the first time) requirement was done away with in January 2010 (for holders of most countries' passports, including US, but not all countries)
. . . ● the fee for U S passport holders, which is in reciprocity with US visa fees to Brazilians, is U$160;
. . . generally a multiple entry visa for ten years from issue (but other times may always be specified by the consular officials);
. . . ● validity is for a maximum duration per stay of ninety days (can be extended within Brazil by the Federal Police up to 90 more days) and a maximum of 180 days per year.

Note for US Citizens obtaining a visa for Brazil at a consulate outside the United States, the process and rules aren't completely the same. So check on the local website for the consulate you plan to visit.

The previous thread is: Tourist Visa for Brazil: questions (archival - closed)


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Old Apr 10, 11, 8:32 pm
  #16  
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
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Leave "Contact in Brazil" Blank?

I got in on the CO mistake fare to GRU. When submitting my VISA application online I see they ask for "Contact in Brazil" on the address tab. Can I just leave this blank except for my estimated arrival date, length of stay, and if I have ever been to Brazil before? I will only be there for 12 hours, so I will have no contact in Brazil.
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Old Apr 14, 11, 10:54 am
  #17  
 
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I will have a 12 hr stay in GRU too.

On my visa application I listed the Marriott GRU Airport address. I submitted my itin as-is. No problems or questions at all.

Applied at consulate in DC on 4/5. Received back today (4/14): Multiple entry, 90-day max, good for 10 years.
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Old Apr 14, 11, 10:57 am
  #18  
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Originally Posted by whistler814 View Post
I will have a 12 hr stay in GRU too.

On my visa application I listed the Marriott GRU Airport address. I submitted my itin as-is. No problems or questions at all.

Applied at consulate in DC on 4/5. Received back today (4/14): Multiple entry, 90-day max, good for 10 years.
^

I am also going to be at the Marriott, so I listed that as my temporary address. Plan to send my pp to NYC on Monday.
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Old Apr 14, 11, 5:39 pm
  #19  
 
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Originally Posted by FriendlySkies View Post
Thanks to the great CO mistake fare (SEA-GRU), I've booked two trips to GRU in June. As I'll be staying for twelve hours, I understand that I need a visa.

Does anybody have a recommendation of a visa service? I have looked at Travisa, but have never used them. Or would it be better to mail in the request to the nearest consulate?
You should check with the particular consulate that has jurisdiction over your residence to see how visas can be obtained there. Some Brazilian consulates -- for example the one in Los Angeles -- will not accept visa applications by mail. The only ways to apply for a visa there are to apply in person or to use a visa service.
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Old Apr 18, 11, 1:17 pm
  #20  
 
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I am going to have my brother submit my documents for me in DC (my jurisdiction). Can anyone tell me what kind of power of attorney do I need? A notarized paper that says he can submit it for me? Does anyone have a sample? I am also aware of the $20 fee.

Last edited by fjord; Apr 18, 11 at 1:23 pm
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Old Apr 19, 11, 8:02 am
  #21  
 
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Maybe someone has more recent experience, but two years ago I applied for a tourist visa for my dad at the DC consulate. No power of attorney was needed.

I recently got my own tourist visa there. Very quick service. Easy metered parking on L street right in front of the office. Drop off took 2 minutes, pick up took 5 at around 9:30-10am. I was more bugged leaving an hour of time on the meter.
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Old Apr 26, 11, 3:07 pm
  #22  
 
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Originally Posted by whistler814 View Post
Maybe someone has more recent experience, but two years ago I applied for a tourist visa for my dad at the DC consulate. No power of attorney was needed.

I recently got my own tourist visa there. Very quick service. Easy metered parking on L street right in front of the office. Drop off took 2 minutes, pick up took 5 at around 9:30-10am. I was more bugged leaving an hour of time on the meter.
me too
I was surprised that I could find parking there. I work a few blocks away from that location and its IMPOSSIBLE to find parking within 3 blocks of where I work. Must be a recession there. : )
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Old Apr 29, 11, 10:17 am
  #23  
 
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Visa service

I have no connection to this firm at all, but thought I'd report outstanding service from Travel Document Systems (TDS). I used their New York City office because I live in upstate NY. I sent our passports, application forms, photos, etc. to arrive Monday morning & I got the passports back Friday morning with 10-year Brazilian tourist visas attached.

They only charged $50 per passport, plus FedEx costs. Well worth it!

David
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Old Apr 29, 11, 8:27 pm
  #24  
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Just got my passport back this morning. I used a company called CIBT (cibt.com).. I also have no relation, fwiw..

Had a discount code, so I paid $39 for the agency fee. Good customer service, and their website allows you to track the pps steps..^
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Old May 3, 11, 12:51 pm
  #25  
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I'm in a bit of a dilemma on the visa issue.

I too, took advantage of the recent CO mistake fare. I will be flying down to GRU hours on May 28th with a 12 hours layover. My problem is that I had sent in my passport to get visa pages. But he passport is not due back until next week. So by the time I get it back, there are only about 2 weeks left to get a Brazil visa.

The SF consulate has jurisdiction for me (Seattle). But it seems they have really stringent requirement....like making an appointment and such.

I'm thinking of using a visa service in Houston, TX. (visaexress) But I'm not sure if that's possible, given my jurisdiction is for San Fran.
So, my question is, when one uses a visa service, do they have to live where the service company will be applying for the visa?

If the time is too tight, I guess my other option is to get an award ticket from GRU to a third country...so that I am allowed to board my original flight w/out a visa. This will be my last resort because I really wanted to leave the airport and take a look around a little bit.
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Old May 12, 11, 9:09 pm
  #26  
 
Join Date: May 2011
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Need Advice- Brazil tourist visa denied - apply at another consulate?

I have a friend who will I will be traveling with to Brazil (hopefully) in the next 2 weeks but he has had some major issues getting his tourist visa. He apparently accidentally selected “business visa” for the first form that he turned in and his application was rejected. He sent in another form for the tourist visa and they just rejected that visa citing that they had determined he was “going to Brazil for volunteer purposes.” He didn’t allude to anything related to volunteering on his application and he indicated that his his occupation was a student. They say he now must apply for a “VITEM I” visa which has very painful documentation attached to it along with a criminal background check that will render getting the visa in time impossible.

Two questions:

1) Will him traveling personally to the consulate in Chicago to plead his case make any difference?

2) I noticed that the Washington D.C. Consulate takes applications from any jurisdiction if they apply in person. If he flew to D.C. to apply in person there are the would the denial issued in Chicago be in a some system linked to the D.C. consulate?

We're leaving May 28th and doing a bit of stressing about this (have airline tickets etc.).

Any help would be greatly appreciated!!!
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Old May 12, 11, 11:41 pm
  #27  
 
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Originally Posted by jrtravel70 View Post

snip snip

Two questions:

1) Will him traveling personally to the consulate in Chicago to plead his case make any difference?
You or your friend might get lucky if you tried to discuss the matter with the consulate. However, read the quoted section below from a Brazilian consulate site as it pertains to the issuance of visas:

"Please note that issuing or denying a visa is a sovereign act of Governments. It is a prerogative applied by every country and strengthened by international practice. The kind of visa - if granted - and the validity period of the visa are also a sovereign decision of the Consulate. NO discussion on this matter will be accepted."

Therefore, it will most likely be a waste of time to try to discuss the refusal of the visa by the consulate.

Originally Posted by jrtravel70 View Post

2) I noticed that the Washington D.C. Consulate takes applications from any jurisdiction if they apply in person. If he flew to D.C. to apply in person there are the would the denial issued in Chicago be in a some system linked to the D.C. consulate?
It is possible that the consulate offices are linked and that D.C. would be aware of the refusal by Chicago. I doubt that the system is that sophisticated, but it could be.

Of course, there is no guarantee your friend would get the visa this way but if he is willing to go to the expense and time, it is worth a shot. If he decides to go this route, make sure the visa application is accurately completed.

The worse that could happen is he would get denied a visa and your friend could spend some pleasant time in Washington, D.C., a wonderful place to visit.

It might appear unforgiving of the consulate to refuse the visa in light of the error that your friend tried to correct. However, reciprocity, is what Brazil is known to do with respect to the issuance of a visa. More specific, if a Brazilian citizen tried to get a U.S. visa and did not accurately complete the visa application, the Brazilian citizen would be refused a visa. Reciprocity is just a nice way of saying payback -

Good luck on whatever you decide. And, if you both make it to Brazil, have a splendid time .
-

Last edited by dgcpaphd; Jun 18, 11 at 1:25 pm
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Old May 13, 11, 4:11 am
  #28  
 
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IIRC Brazil has a centralized visa application system, that requires you to pre-fill all the information before applying. Chances are another consulate will know about it.
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Old May 13, 11, 10:27 am
  #29  
 
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Originally Posted by jrtravel70 View Post


2) I noticed that the Washington D.C. Consulate takes applications from any jurisdiction if they apply in person. If he flew to D.C. to apply in person there are the would the denial issued in Chicago be in a some system linked to the D.C. consulate?

Any help would be greatly appreciated!!!
I had another thought about an alternative to obtaining a visa. Your friend could use the services of a company that acts as an agent for a person who wants a visa. There is a fee for this but it would save a trip to Washington.
-
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Old May 15, 11, 12:36 pm
  #30  
 
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Thumbs up Reciprocity

Originally Posted by Palal View Post
IIRC Brazil has a centralized visa application system, that requires you to pre-fill all the information before applying. Chances are another consulate will know about it.
I hope you have had some luck up to this point. But, Palal is correct. Unless you're flying to the North pole, most all Visa systems are centralized. So no matter where you go, they will have your passport info on file along with your application. So don't make matters worse. You will need to find a consulate official who can reason with your friend and see it as an honest mistake. Don't give up. Brazil is worth the hassle.

To be honest, there is no Tourist Visa required of Americans. In truth, it's a "Reciprocity Visa." Simply put, the Government of Brazil is only imposing on us Americans what we impose on their citizens. The hassle is "parte do jogo" (part of the game). At least you are entitled to a refund of the "reciprocity fee" for being denied. Most Brazilians usually have to take a few days off of work, travel to another city to apply for a US visa for an interview they've been waiting for over 3 months at a fee of $140usd. Guess what happens when they are denied? You figured it out.

None of that helps you. But, take a page from the Brazilian playbook "Jeitinho Brasiliero" Just keep trying. Be honest, apologetic, respectful, but persistent. Sometimes they just want to see you sweat. The Brazilians standing outside the US Consulates in Brazil for 6 hours don't have a choice. As an American who lived in Brazil, I envision the day when we'll be willing to wait on the line for 6 hours to get to Brazil while the rest of the world travels there freely.

Last edited by l etoile; May 15, 11 at 8:00 pm
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