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Phnom Penh Restaurants [Was Finding a “Lost” Restaurant in Phnom Penh]

Phnom Penh Restaurants [Was Finding a “Lost” Restaurant in Phnom Penh]

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Old Apr 21, 19, 1:02 pm
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Phnom Penh Restaurants [Was Finding a “Lost” Restaurant in Phnom Penh]

On a visit there several years ago, I was invited to a very nice upscale restaurant that was located in a most impressive building that was formerly a French colonial bank. This isn’t much to go by, but does anyone recognize this restaurant ?
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Old Apr 21, 19, 1:04 pm
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Old Apr 23, 19, 2:24 am
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Originally Posted by Braniff View Post
On a visit there several years ago, I was invited to a very nice upscale restaurant that was located in a most impressive building that was formerly a French colonial bank. This isn’t much to go by, but does anyone recognize this restaurant ?
Was it by chance just in front of the main post office at #5 street 102 ? A relais & chateaux restaurant called Van’s ? If yes, it doesn’t exist anymore.
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Old Apr 23, 19, 9:00 am
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Originally Posted by Goldorak View Post

Was it by chance just in front of the main post office at #5 street 102 ? A relais & chateaux restaurant called Van’s ? If yes, it doesn’t exist anymore.
Thanks Goldorak. That was it ! Sorry to hear it doesn't exist anymore.
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Old Apr 23, 19, 10:06 am
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We'll be in Phnom Penh for a night later this year. Any suggestions for an enjoyable restaurant? It doesn't need to be fancy.

Is the Foreign Correspondence Club still a good place for a cold beverage?
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Old Apr 23, 19, 2:48 pm
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Originally Posted by SanDiego1K View Post
Is the Foreign Correspondence Club still a good place for a cold beverage?
Definitely yes.
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Old Apr 23, 19, 5:23 pm
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Originally Posted by SanDiego1K View Post
We'll be in Phnom Penh for a night later this year. Any suggestions for an enjoyable restaurant? It doesn't need to be fancy.

Is the Foreign Correspondence Club still a good place for a cold beverage?
I was recommend Malis restaurant. It was expensive but good.

Not sure I would recommend it as it was so expensive, but the story is that during the Khmer Rouge days, they killed off so many people that traditional recipes and cooking techniques were lost.

Malis is trying to resurrect that - at a price!
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Old Apr 24, 19, 12:18 am
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Originally Posted by SQTraveller View Post
I was recommend Malis restaurant. It was expensive but good.

Not sure I would recommend it as it was so expensive, but the story is that during the Khmer Rouge days, they killed off so many people that traditional recipes and cooking techniques were lost.

Malis is trying to resurrect that - at a price!
Indeed, Malis is a very nice place to go (there is one in Siem Reap also, along the River). Prices are more expensive than what you have usually in other restaurants in town, but they will not shock any westerner living in a big city.
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Old Apr 24, 19, 3:11 am
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Originally Posted by Goldorak View Post

Indeed, Malis is a very nice place to go (there is one in Siem Reap also, along the River). Prices are more expensive than what you have usually in other restaurants in town, but they will not shock any westerner living in a big city.
I travelled to Siem Reap as a poor recent graduate ... maybe it's time to go back.
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Old May 18, 19, 9:19 pm
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Originally Posted by SQTraveller View Post
I travelled to Siem Reap as a poor recent graduate ... maybe it's time to go back.
or consider yourself lucky that you saw interesting places before too much tourism happened.
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Old May 18, 19, 11:24 pm
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Originally Posted by SQTraveller View Post
I travelled to Siem Reap as a poor recent graduate ... maybe it's time to go back.
Dunno when you went but my trips were 1997 and 2000 and I think it'd be too depressing to go back. That's a very fragile site and I doubt the admission costs are going to help preserve it or keep the hands and feet off the most sensitive surfaces.

If there had been more Internet back in 1997 I probably would have talked myself out of that one...the Khmer Rouge came back and briefly occupied months after I went. You couldn't stray far from trails because of mines, but crowds were low. I went with friends on the 2000 trip and insisted on going to Banteay Srei, since back in 1997 you needed an armed guard to go there and I didn't want to mess with that. The guesthouse had a fan and mosquito net at $4 and the moto driver cost $6/day and just wanted to sleep in a hammock at the sites (I was prepared for that).

These days I'm sure you've got oodles more hotels and places to eat. I remember the Bayon Restaurant as one of the better choices, and there were the "dog places" that operated only a few days per month. I remember having the viewing peak overlooking the main temple to myself. Thankfully the Lonely Planet had a pretty extensive background section about all the temples, including the minor ones.

The FCCC in Phnom Penh was a wonderful, wonderful place...great atmosphere and all. Because of the direct flights to Siem Reap, maybe PP hasn't been overrun quite as much.
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Old May 19, 19, 6:48 am
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Originally Posted by worldiswide View Post
or consider yourself lucky that you saw interesting places before too much tourism happened.
Siam Reap was one of those places I just never got to until this past February. The crowds were very, very heavy at AW and I have some amusing photos of different tourists. It would have been nice to see it years ago. Even with that, though, it was still magical being there. I had read extensively about the ruins before I went and that knowledge plus taking the time to sit and reflect in several places made the trip worthwhile. I say this even though I had sprained my ankle in December and sprained it again walking through the Saigon airport, this time actually tearing a ligament. It was extremely painful with the steps at times at AW but I would do it again. I can also say that I went to the emergency room at one of the hospitals in SR the morning after I arrived because of that ankle. I received professional, quality care. I would go back to Cambodia in a heartbeat.
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Old May 19, 19, 12:43 pm
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I know we are taking all of this off topic but Cambodia is not one of the places that has opted for responsible tourism.. fragile is the right word for the sites and u need to figure out how tourism is right balance and manage if u want it to last abbd not ju st take short term cash out of it. We were there in 2003 or 04 and the sofitel was opening next to the royal angkor. I think it was the second ir third new hotel..i can't even imagine what the strip looks like now. Everything was brought in including flowers and fruits and vegetables where the idea wsss to build local cottage industries to provide. We were told to stay on the cleared paths since there were still clearing mines. We actually went to an outdoor display of landmines that was one of the most interesting and creepiest places I've been. Also went to bantay srai
And heard the stories of what happened on the roads as you suggest.

we visited Macchu picchu in the 70s and I don't think I could return and see the changes. Progress comes in all sizes and shapes.
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Old May 20, 19, 2:41 pm
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I was in SR in something like 2007 and then again in 2015. The amount of change in that time was astounding. The road from the ariport into town went from not too crowded to wall-to-wall businesses. I guess it is a bit of a conundrum. If you want to see it, it's not going to get any less touristed. But I would imagine some times of the year are better than others. And it also makes sense to branch out beyond the main temples. You can still have a relatively quiet visit and some of the farther afield sights. The town being more lively now than it was felt more positive to me. It's a poor country without a huge amount of natural resources to exploit, so they have to make money somehow. The corruption doesn't help.

PP seemed like it had become unmanageable to me. I did a trip through the eastern part of the country a couple of years ago so I was in and out through PNH. Traffic was nearly unbearable. PP isn't the sleepy little capital it used to be.
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Old Jul 1, 19, 10:28 am
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Phnom Penh Restaurant in old Indochina Bank Site

Originally Posted by Braniff View Post
On a visit there several years ago, I was invited to a very nice upscale restaurant that was located in a most impressive building that was formerly a French colonial bank. This isn’t much to go by, but does anyone recognize this restaurant ?
I just saw this. I passed by this restaurant a week or so ago. It's now Palais La Poste Restaurant.
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