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July 2nd Total Eclipse Transport out of the city

July 2nd Total Eclipse Transport out of the city

Old May 1, 19, 2:16 pm
  #1  
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July 2nd Total Eclipse Transport out of the city

My partner and I will be flying into EZE for a week for our first visit to Buenos Aires, with the hope of catching the total eclipse on the 2nd of July. Looking at the totality path it looks like we need to get out of BA proper and I was hoping to get some more info on options since I haven't found much concrete info while googling. I know the weather is historically against us but at the very least we will have a vacation, and if everything works out we can see the totality.

It seems like we could possibly take a train or bus to another town like Lujan, Lobos or Canuelas, but I was also thinking some tour agency might offer a day tour, but I haven't found any. Hiring a driver for 4-8 hours so we don't need to worry about timetables etc seems to be another option.

Searching around online left me without any obvious options. Are there local tour agencies offering transport or maybe car services/ drivers anyone could recommend? I strongly prefer to not rent a car and drive myself, but I guess that's technically an option as well.
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Old May 4, 19, 7:14 am
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Article from National Geographic

San Juan, Argentina mentioned below. It’s actually an up-and-coming wine region as well. Somewhat of a sleepy town in general, I’ve only been twice once touring around vineyards, and when Mendoza was closed a few years back I flew into that airport and took the airline supplied buses to Mendoza. Something to consider, if you’re still thinking about viewing the eclipse.. Buenos Aires is also noted with 99% totality (see below)

I Starstruck I

A solar eclipse is coming this summer. Here’s where to see it.

Start planning: Spots for this once-in-a-lifetime experience are filling up.

Since North America’s 2017 solar eclipse, interest in the wonders of the sky has skyrocketed. While it’s hard to quantify how many travelers are stargazing in dark sky spots and traveling to see eclipses, “astrotourism” (traveling for astronomical experiences) is one of the top travel trends for 2019.

Among such attractions as meteor showers or the northern lights, solar eclipses hold their own: Here, the moon fully blocks the sun and casts an eerie shadow (or umbra) across our planet. Earth’s next total solar eclipse will sweep across the South Pacific and South America on July 2, 2019, and destinations in the path of totality are gearing up for crowds of “umbraphiles.” (Read about May’s top stargazing events.)

Check out these five great spots to see this summer’s eclipse—but act quickly, as many tours and hotels are filling up. International eclipse-chasing is not a spur-of-the-moment kind of trip, but it certainly is an unforgettable one.

Note: Wherever you go, you’ll need to protect your eyes during certain parts of the eclipse. Look for solar eclipse glasses which comply with the ISO 12312-2 international safety standard.

Elqui Valley, Chile

Why go: Chile’s Elqui Valley has leaped onto the global stage as a world-class stargazing destination—and it’s a prime spot to experience totality during the July 2 eclipse. The valley, known for its pisco production and astronomical observatories, is expecting over a quarter-million visitors for the days surrounding the eclipse.

Plan your visit: While you won’t need a tour to experience totality here, it’s best to book all travel and accommodation in advance. After the one-hour flight from Santiago to La Serena (also in the path of totality), drive another hour to Vicuña, the epicenter of eclipse mania. Don’t forget to book an observatory tour when you’re in the area: Mamalluca Observatory offers tours in Spanish and English. (These National Geographic Lodges are top choices for nature’s most amazing natural light shows.)

San Juan, Argentina

Why go: As one of the largest cities in the path of totality, San Juan, Argentina, is one of the most popular eclipse destinations. Its population of 112,000 is expected to quintuple on the days surrounding the eclipse.

Plan your visit: Reach San Juan from Buenos Aires by a 14-hour drive or a 90-minute flight. To avoid overbooked flights, get creative on your timing: Consider spending a few days in the area, which is a great base for wine-tasting or history tours. On the day of the eclipse, head to one of the city’s main parks to view totality; Parque de Mayo or Plaza 25 de Mayo are both good options.

Cruising from French Polynesia

Why go: Mix astrotourism with snorkeling and cultural immersion by viewing the total solar eclipse aboard the small cruise ship, Paul Gauguin. The 15-day, round-trip cruise, offered by tour operators including TravelQuest, includes visits to some of French Polynesia’s most paradisiacal islands.

Plan your visit: After setting sail from Papeete, Tahiti, you’ll experience totality on day seven, bookended by shipboard lectures on Polynesia culture and visits to Bora Bora, Huahine, and atolls including Rangiroa. As if this trip isn’t bucket list–worthy enough, there’s an optional Easter Island add-on before the ship sets sail on June 26. (Find a tour already booked? Start planning for a Pacific cruise beneath the 2020 total solar eclipse instead.)

Oeno Island, Pitcairn Islands

Why go: Where the French Polynesia tour offers eclipse viewing at sea, Pitcairn Islands Tourism’s eight-day solar eclipse cruise includes viewing totality on uninhabited Oeno Island. This cruise sets sail from Mangareva, French Polynesia, on June 29, with a University of Canterbury professor, Dr. John Hearnshaw, serving as your astronomical guide.

Plan your visit: In addition to eclipse-watching on Oeno Island, you’ll have two days ashore Pitcairn Island, the only inhabited island of the eponymous archipelago. Recently named an official Dark Sky Sanctuary, the Pitcairns also offer stellar stargazing in pristine darkness every night.

Buenos Aires, Argentina

Why go: Buenos Aires is the only destination on this list where you won’t experience totality during the solar eclipse. In Buenos Aires, the moon will block just 99 percent of the sun, so you’ll need to keep those eclipse glasses on the entire time.

Plan your visit: Buenos Aires is a great option for those for whom one of the more far-flung destinations is out of reach. You don’t need to book a special tour to experience the eclipse—just look for the nearest city park with an unobstructed westward view. The Parque Central will likely draw crowds on the day of the event.

Valerie Stimac is a freelance writer who runs the site Space Tourism Guide and is author of the forthcoming book Dark Skies: A Practical Guide to Astrotourism. Follow her on Twitter and Instagram @Valerie_valise.

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Old May 4, 19, 10:07 am
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I believe that EZE is in the path - barely. Good luck. Most things probably booked up last year. I had considered adjusting my schedule to be able to travel there during the eclipse, and decided that between the weather and the hassles (and having just seen the perfect eclipse in Salem, OR), that I'd pass.

I'd consider taking a close look at the totality map, and staying at the Holiday Inn Ezeiza for a night, if rooms are available. It is probably in the totality path. I'd expect traffic will be a quilombo.
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Old May 6, 19, 7:12 am
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Is getting a Room with a balcony on a high-floor of any help...??? Sorry, Im a 100% non eclipse kind of person so maybe staying in the city proper will work against the view.....
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Old May 6, 19, 8:03 am
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Thanks for the replies everyone. It kind of confirms my initial thought that I shouldn't focus so much on optimizing the eclipse viewing at this point and should just enjoy the trip overall. I looked into flying to San Juan for the day but it doesn't seem worth it and my partner was not really on board with the idea. I think our hotel has a rooftop pool, so maybe we can get a decent view from the roof.

I liked Eastbay1K's suggestion for the Holiday inn, rates are still reasonable ($92 for that night) but getting there seems like the issue. Sadly I found out about the 2017 eclipse too late for booking anything to be remotely reasonable.
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Old May 8, 19, 11:02 am
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The edge of 100% totality (blue line) runs approximately from Lujan to La Plata so that would exclude the city of BsAs. Closer to the red center line is better. There is a considerable difference in viewing from 99% to 100%. Unfortunately winter cloud cover may work against seeing the sun at all. The timing is also minutes before sunset, so the sun will be very low in the northwestern sky at the time of eclipse.


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Old May 8, 19, 11:14 am
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Thanks for the replies all, I thought I had replied before but I don't see it now. I understand there's a lot working against us and I think we will just make peace with the fact we won't get a great view (or none at all if it's cloudy) - maybe things will work out, but if not we won't be disappointed. I did get some of the eclipse viewing glasses so even if we only get to see the 99% totality from out hotel roof that should be ok.
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Old May 8, 19, 2:29 pm
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Originally Posted by nxlinc View Post
Thanks for the replies all, I thought I had replied before but I don't see it now. I understand there's a lot working against us and I think we will just make peace with the fact we won't get a great view (or none at all if it's cloudy) - maybe things will work out, but if not we won't be disappointed. I did get some of the eclipse viewing glasses so even if we only get to see the 99% totality from out hotel roof that should be ok.
Having recently seen a total eclipse, I can tell you that the difference between 99% and 100% is all the world. If you've got the opportunity to see totality, go for it.
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Old May 9, 19, 7:25 pm
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I'm a 100 miles from the capital and seem to be located right under its path. However due to the timing of it plus the short winter day I don't think it'll be all that great an experience. Not that bothered to be honest.
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Old May 10, 19, 4:49 am
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Originally Posted by HIDDY View Post
I'm a 100 miles from the capital and seem to be located right under its path. However due to the timing of it plus the short winter day I don't think it'll be all that great an experience. Not that bothered to be honest.
Hope your cattle arent upset by it , Hiddy . they can sometimes get nervous....
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Old May 10, 19, 6:35 am
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Originally Posted by malagajohn View Post
Hope your cattle arent upset by it , Hiddy . they can sometimes get nervous....
Not as nervous as when the vet is around.

We got out of the cattle game a year ago but yes I've heard such an event can have a strange effect on animals and birds.
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Old May 10, 19, 11:04 am
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Originally Posted by HIDDY View Post

We got out of the cattle game a year ago but yes I've heard such an event can have a strange effect on animals and birds.
This is unlikely to occur in Argentina during the eclipse, because:

(1) The animals and birds in Argentina are already strange; or
(2) The people in Argentina won't notice the animals and birds; or
(3) The eclipse is so closely timed to sundown that the animals and birds will just think it is the end of the day.
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Old May 10, 19, 11:47 am
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Originally Posted by Eastbay1K View Post
This is unlikely to occur in Argentina during the eclipse, because:

(1) The animals and birds in Argentina are already strange; or
(2) The people in Argentina won't notice the animals and birds; or
(3) The eclipse is so closely timed to sundown that the animals and birds will just think it is the end of the day.
Must admit I've become a bit strange since coming to live here.

Although I'm not sure of the precise timing of it I suspect where I am it'll be getting pretty dark anyway when it starts.
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Old May 12, 19, 1:19 pm
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Exclamation

Rubbish !!!

You were already weird before coming down here !!!!!

Originally Posted by HIDDY View Post
Must admit I've become a bit strange since coming to live here.
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Old May 12, 19, 1:24 pm
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Gaucho 100K . YOU ARE TOTALLY WRONG....!!!!!!!

Hiddy and all the rest of the West of Scotland guys who live in Argentina are totally normal . Its the other 40 million who live here that are crazy.
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