Amex vs Amazon disputes

Old Nov 11, 20, 6:45 am
  #1  
was bluegatorade
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Amex vs Amazon disputes

Recently I noticed two fraudulent charges on my Amex for 1.99 and 12.99, both from Amazon. I contacted Amazon regarding these charges, and the customer service rep asked for a 10 digit charge ID, which I asked Amex CS rep and they said they don't know what that is. I disputed the charges with Amex and the ruling was not in my favor. Amex found that I am responsible for these charges. I went back to Amazon to hopefully get another CS rep, but failed. With the same rep, I explained the situation and asked them to look into it, and they found that there are three other emails/accounts with my Amex info, including my billing address. So Amazon issued the following message for me, which, they said, if taken to the bank, can be used as evidence for my dispute.



With this new information in hand, I reached out to Amex again to dispute the charges. Three weeks later, Amex again ruled that I am responsible for these charges.

This is the second time this has happened - someone used my card info on Amazon to pay for purchases or Prime membership. The first time was with my Chase card, which Chase immediately resolved. This time is much more challenging.

Has anyone has experience similar to mine? How did you resolve it?
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Old Nov 11, 20, 10:03 am
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I also had a recent fraudulent charge from amazon that was well into $300+ range. Spoke to both Amazon and Amex CS and both said the charge was bogus. Amex has since removed the amount and a new card was sent my way. Will update once the dispute has been resolved
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Old Nov 11, 20, 10:39 am
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I would notify Amex Fraud. The #1 issue is to cancel the card and get it replaced, Be prepared to supply a copy of the note from Amazon. Amex will almost certainly ask which charges were fraudulent and that will likely lead to a credit for those.

As this is the second time for you and with a different card, you should carefully consider who might have access to your accounts and where you do business. Change all passwords on all accounts and make certain that they are all different. The source of the fraud could be almost anywhere, but you might focus on merchants which do not have conactless "touch" or who are not using chip readers (where you insert the card).

I would also enable the text notification feature on your card and set it to $0, so that you receive a text every time there is activity on the account.

Once it is all settled, go back to Amazon to open a new account with the new card. At that point, I would also set up OTP so that you receive a one-time passcode every time you log in. Don't forget that if you share your laptop or other device with others or others may have access to it and you also store passwords on your device that you are essentially leaving the account open and unlocked.. A bit of a hassle, but the convenience is not made up for by this hassle.
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Old Nov 11, 20, 2:19 pm
  #4  
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Originally Posted by Often1 View Post
I would notify Amex Fraud. The #1 issue is to cancel the card and get it replaced, Be prepared to supply a copy of the note from Amazon. Amex will almost certainly ask which charges were fraudulent and that will likely lead to a credit for those.

As this is the second time for you and with a different card, you should carefully consider who might have access to your accounts and where you do business. Change all passwords on all accounts and make certain that they are all different. The source of the fraud could be almost anywhere, but you might focus on merchants which do not have conactless "touch" or who are not using chip readers (where you insert the card).

I would also enable the text notification feature on your card and set it to $0, so that you receive a text every time there is activity on the account.

Once it is all settled, go back to Amazon to open a new account with the new card. At that point, I would also set up OTP so that you receive a one-time passcode every time you log in. Don't forget that if you share your laptop or other device with others or others may have access to it and you also store passwords on your device that you are essentially leaving the account open and unlocked.. A bit of a hassle, but the convenience is not made up for by this hassle.
Thanks for the information - I do some of these already, such as using complex and different passwords between different accounts, always had OTP enabled, etc. I think it might be a non-Amazon merchant who has leaked my card info, rather than Amazon itself. But I don't know...
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Old Nov 11, 20, 2:28 pm
  #5  
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Originally Posted by ChateauMargaux View Post
Recently I noticed two fraudulent charges on my Amex for 1.99 and 12.99, both from Amazon. I contacted Amazon regarding these charges, and the customer service rep asked for a 10 digit charge ID, which I asked Amex CS rep and they said they don't know what that is. I disputed the charges with Amex and the ruling was not in my favor. Amex found that I am responsible for these charges. I went back to Amazon to hopefully get another CS rep, but failed. With the same rep, I explained the situation and asked them to look into it, and they found that there are three other emails/accounts with my Amex info, including my billing address. So Amazon issued the following message for me, which, they said, if taken to the bank, can be used as evidence for my dispute.



With this new information in hand, I reached out to Amex again to dispute the charges. Three weeks later, Amex again ruled that I am responsible for these charges.

This is the second time this has happened - someone used my card info on Amazon to pay for purchases or Prime membership. The first time was with my Chase card, which Chase immediately resolved. This time is much more challenging.

Has anyone has experience similar to mine? How did you resolve it?
For such small amounts, I am surprised Amex ruled against you on the disputes. Many credit card issuers (not necessarily Amex) often just issue credits without any investigation unless you dispute charges often or the disputed charges are higher dollar amounts.

LAX
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Old Nov 11, 20, 4:11 pm
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Originally Posted by LAX View Post
For such small amounts, I am surprised Amex ruled against you on the disputes. Many credit card issuers (not necessarily Amex) often just issue credits without any investigation unless you dispute charges often or the disputed charges are higher dollar amounts.

LAX
Yeah this is definitely not the norm for AmEx. The rare 1-2 times I've disputed a sub ~$25 amount, AmEx instantly Closed the dispute in my favor. I assume it's an auto-process depending on the dollar amount being disputed.
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Old Nov 11, 20, 4:54 pm
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I am 90% Amex runs an algo on disputes and the computer decides.
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Old Nov 11, 20, 5:49 pm
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I have my Amex security set up to text me whenever a charge is made without the card present. Usually this is a bunch of spam notifying me of charges I know I made but it is a nice check. A couple of months ago received a text notifying me of a charge from Amazon Marketplace for $70-$80 which I did not recognize. I started digging through my Amazon orders to see if this was a legitimate charge for something I ordered, possibly a back-order, but it was not my charge. I then called Amazon and they had me confirm information for my card and my account and the rep kept asking me if I had any other e-mails. It turns out someone had opened a separate account using my name and my card info but a different e-mail address. I told the rep the other account was fraudulent and to shut it down. I was a bit surprised when they said they would have to kick it over to their fraud protection department for investigation and would not immediately shut down the fraudulent account. After pressing the rep let on that it was possible that I was the fraudster and the other account was genuine which was why they would not immediately shut down the other account. They did freeze the disputed transaction pending investigation (item not yet shipped) and told me to contact Amex to report it which I did immediately. Amex removed the charge, shut down my card and sent me a replacement and told me to contact Amazon (which I had already done).

A favorable resolution for me but I fortunately caught this immediately thanks to text alerts, reported it immediately, and Amex (and I assume Amazon after their investigation) took care of it. How long was it after the charges were made before you reported the fraudulent charges?
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Old Nov 11, 20, 6:48 pm
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Originally Posted by skimthetrees View Post
A favorable resolution for me but I fortunately caught this immediately thanks to text alerts, reported it immediately, and Amex (and I assume Amazon after their investigation) took care of it. How long was it after the charges were made before you reported the fraudulent charges?
The 1.99 charge was made on 9/29, and the 12.99 charge was made on 10/6, I disputed both transactions on 10/6.
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Old Nov 11, 20, 7:45 pm
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It is unlikely that you will ever find out where the fraud took place unless it is internal at home or work. Also, not worth the effort. Just doing all the things above will protect you for the near-term. The OTP is critical as it would have prevented the fraudulent Amazon charges from being processed in the first place.
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Old Nov 13, 20, 9:27 pm
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Originally Posted by ChateauMargaux View Post
The 1.99 charge was made on 9/29, and the 12.99 charge was made on 10/6, I disputed both transactions on 10/6.
I would escalate the call with Amex. I have never had a problem disputing fraudulent charges of any amount and like others have mentioned, it comes with a new card number most likely which is a temporary hassle. The Fraud Dept was so keen to end the fraudulent charges that the middle six digits of my card was permanently changed as well.

Their continued denials seem very odd.
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Old Nov 14, 20, 4:11 pm
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Originally Posted by ChateauMargaux View Post
The 1.99 charge was made on 9/29, and the 12.99 charge was made on 10/6, I disputed both transactions on 10/6.
That should be fine time-frame wise.
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Old Nov 14, 20, 4:17 pm
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A separate issue here is that OP may find that opening a new account with Amazon is problematic. It has a fairly tough policy on closing accounts when a customer initiates a chargeback. It sounds as though OP dealt with this through the chargeback rather than fraud process. The latter would have yielded a new card, credits for the two amounts and notification by Amex to Amazon on OP's behalf.
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