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Will AA give me trouble about a $1300 hotel refund request?

Will AA give me trouble about a $1300 hotel refund request?

Old Mar 12, 2024, 11:13 pm
  #31  
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Originally Posted by fly747first
Not when it is a situation that everything is sold out, especially at a hotel that AA may not have a contract with
No, if AA has a contract rate with a hotel, it is honored regardless of the hotel's occupancy that night. That's the whole point of a contract rate, which typically involves AA's guaranteeing a certain number of room-nights annually.


Originally Posted by moondog
He merely needs to demonstrate that $1300 was the lowest rate available to him.
Originally Posted by orbitmic
For what it's worth, if I were in such a situation, I'd take a print out of hotel booking pages showing that this was the lowest priced room available.
You mean demonstrate that there were no less expensive hotels available in the area? Apart from the logic issue of trying to prove a negative, how does one get a printout of hotel availability from, say, last week?
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Old Mar 12, 2024, 11:18 pm
  #32  
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Originally Posted by Dr. HFH
No, if AA has a contract rate with a hotel, it is honored regardless of the hotel's occupancy that night. That's the whole point of a contract rate, which typically involves AA's guaranteeing a certain number of room-nights annually.
It has not been established whether or not AA had a contract at the hotel in question. Remember, they don't overnight crews at ELH.

You mean demonstrate that there were no less expensive hotels available in the area? Apart from the logic issue of trying to prove a negative, how does one get a printout of hotel availability from, say, last week?
I usually grab screen shots from 3 different OTAs.
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Old Mar 12, 2024, 11:33 pm
  #33  
 
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Originally Posted by chuck1
We will be submitting expenses and I'll let everyone knows how it goes.
The crew took the same ferry and was eating dinner in the restaurant.

ELH airport staff said this has never happened before.
In high season they have 2X to MIA and 1X to CLT.
DL has a flight to ATL.
I'm assuming AA does not do layovers in ELH and all trips are flown as turns.
I think you have a good case and its pretty easy to document what Harbour Island hotels run. Royal Palms and Tingum Village are more affordable; however, If they even had room this time of year thats likely where the airline put the passengers that were accommodated.

I spend a lot of time there. I dont think I have ever seen a commercial airline crew housed on island. Some of the private jet crews come over while their employers are visiting though. The hotels are small and privately held operations. Not likely to get a company discount - especially during Spring Break or Christmas.

The crew restaurant meal wasnt cheap either!

Last edited by rowsign; Mar 12, 2024 at 11:35 pm Reason: Spelling
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Old Mar 13, 2024, 1:22 am
  #34  
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Originally Posted by Dr. HFH
You mean demonstrate that there were no less expensive hotels available in the area? Apart from the logic issue of trying to prove a negative, how does one get a printout of hotel availability from, say, last week?
No, it's proving a positive - that you did due diligence, and you don't do it now for last week, you do it at the time of booking: just a print out of Kayak or booking.com or hotels.com ordered by price, It will show what you searched for and what results were returned. If you mean that there might have been cheaper options if you had checked 50 websites or called individual, sure there might have been but that is not the point here - airlines can't just dump their duty to book your accommodation due to disruptions they caused and then fight for hours to save them pennies. What they are arguably entitled to is to make a reasonable effort to ensure that you book a night offering reasonable value for money rather than just pick the best and most expensive hotel you can think of or the first one offered to you if the price looks nuts.

So what you are doing here is simply documenting the process you went through when booking your own accommodation: and back the narrative which the OP makes in the first post: op did a search, it showed that the cheapest and most reachable available hotel nearby was at the price quoted and required the transport noted. Instead of only "saying" it, you just "show" it.
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Old Mar 13, 2024, 6:08 am
  #35  
 
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It was AA's choice to have a mechanic "on call" instead of at the airport during their operational hours. Thus they can own the consequences of it taking so long for the on-call guy to come to the plane that it caused the crew to time out. I'd make a real nuisance of myself if they deny the actual out-of-pocket amount for your room.

Getting a couple of screenshots or PDFs of the search results from Expedia and Kayak on the day of disruption would not have been a bad idea, and certainly one to tuck away in the future (I always PDF the lowest coach fare at time of booking, for example, even if I am booking a premium cabin fare, in case I get one of those stupid coach-with-a-free-upgrade-to-F fares where the minute something goes wrong you're back in 37B on the next flight -- if they want to pull that they're going to refund me the delta between what I paid and what I could have paid for what I ended up receiving). Sad that we have to document like this, but it is what it is.
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Old Mar 13, 2024, 7:59 am
  #36  
 
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Originally Posted by Antarius
Always have credit card trip delay insurance for this. I just skip the rubbish AA offer and get whatever I want.



It's the Project Oasis of hotels.
This wasnt on my dime. And, if you can believe this, I work for a global provider of travel insurance, but the entity I am with does not provide travel insurance either as stand alone coverage or as an ala carte selection via our corporate AMEX, which I am required to use.
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Old Mar 13, 2024, 8:48 am
  #37  
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Originally Posted by moondog
If the hotel was an acceptable abode to shack up the crew, obviously they'll approve the same place for paying customers.
Originally Posted by moondog
The "that's too expensive" argument becomes toothless the moment they buy it for their own staff.
I am not following your logic here.

They are contractually (collective bargaining agreements) and legally (FAA rest requirements) obligated to provide lodging for their crew, whatever the cost. How does that translate to the same obligation to assengers beyond the contractual requirements of the CoC?
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Old Mar 13, 2024, 9:07 am
  #38  
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Originally Posted by planecrashlaw
This wasnt on my dime. And, if you can believe this, I work for a global provider of travel insurance, but the entity I am with does not provide travel insurance either as stand alone coverage or as an ala carte selection via our corporate AMEX, which I am required to use.
Gotcha.

The good news is that you shouldn't end up out of pocket then, even if AA doesn't come through.
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Old Mar 13, 2024, 11:05 am
  #39  
 
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Originally Posted by william142
I think you will have a big problem unfortunately. Anytime I've booked my own hotel after a AA maintenance meltdown, they always come back with the maximum rate for your aea is $115.00 per night so that is all we will reimburse for. Hopefully this is not the case for you.

Will
$115 is awfully generous! Where was that? Forced overnight recently at DFW and AA only reimbursed $100. Thank goodness for the AAA discount at the DFW Hyatt.
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Old Mar 13, 2024, 11:18 am
  #40  
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Originally Posted by Bear96
I am not following your logic here.

They are contractually (collective bargaining agreements) and legally (FAA rest requirements) obligated to provide lodging for their crew, whatever the cost. How does that translate to the same obligation to assengers beyond the contractual requirements of the CoC?
The logic is that they value the safety and well-being of their customers at least as much as they do the same for their employees. In light of the fact that their customers don't have a collective bargaining agreement of their own, why not apply the same principles of the agreements that do exist?
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Old Mar 13, 2024, 3:29 pm
  #41  
 
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I ended up at the Detroit airport overnight due to weather. The word on the street was zero options for hotels both due to weather and due to occupancy at the hotels. I hopped in a shuttle with a dozen or so airline staff and headed to Dearborn. Once at the hotel I waited in line with the staff and the clerk handed me a key and a voucher for breakfast. The next morning I woke up and rode the shuttle back the airprot with the same airline staff. Not a word was said. One of the most pleasant IROPS.

But as to the $1300 room, I think I would sleep at the airport and not risk a $1300 bill. AA isn't going to pay for a $1300 hotel.
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Old Mar 13, 2024, 3:38 pm
  #42  
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Originally Posted by view-with-a-room
But as to the $1300 room, I think I would sleep at the airport and not risk a $1300 bill. AA isn't going to pay for a $1300 hotel.
Is that an option at ELH?
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Old Mar 13, 2024, 3:45 pm
  #43  
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This will be interesting to watch. American paid all our expenses when we were cancelled at 23.00 at CLT. I thought that I would have a fight, but in absolute fairness we did not. I'd be d**ned if I am sleeping on airport floors. At that time of night in that location and told to sort themselves out - the OP did what I would have done.

Dear OP - American took weeks to get back to me but they did. I wish you well
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Old Mar 14, 2024, 7:19 am
  #44  
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Originally Posted by Dr. HFH
No, if AA has a contract rate with a hotel, it is honored regardless of the hotel's occupancy that night. That's the whole point of a contract rate, which typically involves AA's guaranteeing a certain number of room-nights annually.

You obviously have never worked for a hotel nor do you understand how airline contracts work. If a hotel only has a suite left, for example, they don't have to give it to AA or any other airline at a discounted rate UNLESS the hotel failed to reserve the number of contracted hotel rooms and thus has a contractual obligation to honor that. In cases of extremely high occupancy, some hotels will close all discounted rates and only offer the full RACK rate. A hotel does not have to make a higher number of rooms available other than the negotiated daily number of rooms under the contract which will contain a clause warning the airline that the hotel may not always be able to honor a higher number of discounted rooms (especially on holidays and market-specific large events) than what it is actually negotiated on the contract at the daily level.

Most airlines negotiate a block of rooms with hotels. These are usually for entry-level rooms although some unions impose some restrictions (e.g., WN requires that its flight crews only get assigned rooms with interior corridors at its contracted FLL hotels that have multiple towers including some accommodations that can only be accessed through external corridors).
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Old Mar 14, 2024, 11:52 am
  #45  
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Originally Posted by fly747first
You obviously have never worked for a hotel nor do you understand how airline contracts work. If a hotel only has a suite left, for example, they don't have to give it to AA or any other airline at a discounted rate UNLESS the hotel failed to reserve the number of contracted hotel rooms and thus has a contractual obligation to honor that. In cases of extremely high occupancy, some hotels will close all discounted rates and only offer the full RACK rate. A hotel does not have to make a higher number of rooms available other than the negotiated daily number of rooms under the contract which will contain a clause warning the airline that the hotel may not always be able to honor a higher number of discounted rooms (especially on holidays and market-specific large events) than what it is actually negotiated on the contract at the daily level.

Most airlines negotiate a block of rooms with hotels. These are usually for entry-level rooms although some unions impose some restrictions (e.g., WN requires that its flight crews only get assigned rooms with interior corridors at its contracted FLL hotels that have multiple towers including some accommodations that can only be accessed through external corridors).
Yep... lots of different types of arrangements. I've worked for companies that had negotiated LRA rates with some chains, and others where the negotiated rate was unavailable during peak periods or when the hotel was above a certain occupancy (instead they might get a % off the BAR). I'd bet that AA's contracts are either LRA or LRTA.
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