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American Airlines Flight Attendant Physically Detains Aviation Photographer

American Airlines Flight Attendant Physically Detains Aviation Photographer

Old Nov 3, 22, 7:37 pm
  #61  
 
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Pure hero behavior, IMHO.
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Old Nov 3, 22, 9:57 pm
  #62  
 
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Originally Posted by bocastephen View Post
Well, actually it is private property - it's a public means of transportation, but it's still private property. Like any business with private property, they can 'refuse service to anyone' - but that does not include kidnapping customers AFTER the flight.
this is not entirely accurate. Public transportation is highly regulated. Saying its private property and they can "refuse" arbitrarily etc would be like comparing a guest I invite over to my home to a tenant who pays me to rent my home. I could ask a guest to not bring weapons into my home and enforce that rule. But if I rent my home out to a tenant, then the tenant relationship is governed by fair housing laws and in most jurisdictions, that likely allows the tenant to store legally owned weapons in their abode to protect themselves - even though it is technically private property that belongs to me. the "private property" aspect becomes pretty meaningless when you enter a regulated contract status.

I can't be sued for refusing to give a stranger a ride in my car, but an airline could easily be sued and lose if they start arbitrarily denying tickets to persons without good reason, (or for doing something that every other pax also does, like take iphone selfies) and discrimination could be claimed.
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Old Nov 4, 22, 4:47 am
  #63  
 
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Perhaps the photographer could sue AA in civil court and if it goes to trial ask the court to issue an order prohibiting AA from banning him (in addition to damages) or if there is a settlement include a clause stipulating that AA will not retaliate by banning him.
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Old Nov 4, 22, 6:58 am
  #64  
 
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Who cares really? 2 people just trying to go about their day doing their jobs got into an altercation and both lived to tell about it.
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Old Nov 4, 22, 4:09 pm
  #65  
 
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Originally Posted by StevenSeagalFan View Post
Who cares really? 2 people just trying to go about their day doing their jobs got into an altercation and both lived to tell about it.
Really? You don't see the issue with FAs and a captain potentially exceeding their authority by forcing someone who has already deplaned back onto the aircraft in this manner?
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Old Nov 5, 22, 12:31 am
  #66  
 
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Originally Posted by Travelsonic View Post
Really? You don't see the issue with FAs and a captain potentially exceeding their authority by forcing someone who has already deplaned back onto the aircraft in this manner?
If we're to believe the narrative as is, nope, no problem. Idk who has a bigger ego an aviation photo blogger or an inflight crew member, but both are always looking for a fight and have a chip on their shoulder.
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Old Nov 5, 22, 1:40 pm
  #67  
 
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Originally Posted by bbriscoe34 View Post
A plane is public transportation, not private property. Not apples to apples at all here. Hence the contract of carriage.
I have attended events that prohibit photography of other attendees or event staff without their permission. None of them thought that this give them any rights to access a device or detain someone engaging in photography in violation of the policy - the maximum available sanction was exclusion from the event without compensation. Likewise, I don't see how any airline photography policy gives them the right to detain a photographer or access a device.
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Old Nov 5, 22, 2:40 pm
  #68  
 
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Originally Posted by twb3 View Post
I have attended events that prohibit photography of other attendees or event staff without their permission. None of them thought that this give them any rights to access a device or detain someone engaging in photography in violation of the policy - the maximum available sanction was exclusion from the event without compensation. Likewise, I don't see how any airline photography policy gives them the right to detain a photographer or access a device.
Not only is all this true, but most events that prohibit photography (or more commonly filming) have a vested interest in the prohibition that is closely related to their product - a movie theatre or live performance Is making their money from people paying to watch their show, so filming clearly creates a violation of their competitive position. But whatever interest an airline has in wanting to prohibit filming in what is essential a public transportation venue - whether it is some abstract and undefined security risk, or privacy concern, or desire to not be held accountable for events that transpire, likely none of that rise to the level of interest of passengers wanting to photo-document their vacations. Those potential interests of the airline just don't hold much water in the real world (compared to that of a live performance), and a reasonable court will usually agree.
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Old Nov 5, 22, 7:37 pm
  #69  
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Originally Posted by bbriscoe34 View Post
Not only is all this true, but most events that prohibit photography (or more commonly filming) have a vested interest in the prohibition that is closely related to their product - a movie theatre or live performance Is making their money from people paying to watch their show, so filming clearly creates a violation of their competitive position. But whatever interest an airline has in wanting to prohibit filming in what is essential a public transportation venue - whether it is some abstract and undefined security risk, or privacy concern, or desire to not be held accountable for events that transpire, likely none of that rise to the level of interest of passengers wanting to photo-document their vacations. Those potential interests of the airline just don't hold much water in the real world (compared to that of a live performance), and a reasonable court will usually agree.
Things have changed a LOT as phones (i.e. - cameras) have become ubiquitous. There was a time when pulling out a camera and taking a picture in a Las Vegas casino could result in a trespass charge. Using analogies ("I went to an event . . .") does not accurately define the limits of the law. (Again, I am commenting on the general issues, not the particular event described by the OP).
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