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Passenger with nut allergy wants FC flyers to forego dinner

Passenger with nut allergy wants FC flyers to forego dinner

Old Sep 27, 22, 7:45 am
  #106  
 
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Originally Posted by Antarius View Post
Right. Natasha's law really has nothing to do with airplanes even; the location was incidental and could have happened anywhere. The issue is entirely to do with food labeling.

You are right that it is to do with food labelling and point of sale information, but also food preparation and food service, which catering onboard is part of. Also this has caused many UK business to opt on the side of caution and adopt stricter allergen policy than even required by law. Finally? the parents of Natasha are campaigning for more widespread allergen related law changes as illustrated in the article I posted above
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Old Sep 27, 22, 8:27 am
  #107  
 
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Originally Posted by dickinson View Post
On AA 1982 BOS to MiA. Woman in front of me can't understand why they are going to serve dinner. She says it could kill her because of her nut allergy. She is never flying AA again because she says all other airlines honor her request.
Was that a threat or an enticement?
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Old Sep 27, 22, 8:38 am
  #108  
 
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Originally Posted by nineworldseries View Post
Because we all know the plural of anecdote is data

Actually, the plural of anecdote IS data!
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Old Sep 27, 22, 9:43 am
  #109  
 
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Was this the woman doused in perfume, clothes reeking of cigarette smoke traveling with her dander laden pet? Hey, Im allergic! Guess I cant fly or even leave the house. Or maybe adapt.
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Old Sep 27, 22, 11:40 am
  #110  
 
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She's a nut case.
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Old Sep 27, 22, 12:13 pm
  #111  
 
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Originally Posted by MDTyKe View Post
Considering the way air circulates on planes, they should have offered her to sit in the very back row instead.
My guess is their lawyers judged that as soon as they attempt to make/articulate accommodations and policies to cater to nut allergies, it actually exposes them to liability that they don't currently expose themselves to.
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Old Sep 27, 22, 12:29 pm
  #112  
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Originally Posted by M60_to_LGA View Post
When I was a grad school, I had a part-time internship at a consulting firm. I went in a couple of days a week to find various numbers in annual reports and 10-Ks and plug them into spreadsheets, do PowerPoints, stuff like that.

One day I bought some peanut M&Ms and brought them back to the office, and I asked others there if they wanted any. One guy said he couldn't because he had a very serious peanut allergy. I apologized and asked him if I should put them away, and he just said, nah, it's fine.

These people who claim they're going to die if they so much as look at a peanut on an airplane - I have a really hard time believing that, I'm sorry.

EDIT: Forgot to ask - did the woman die, blow up like a balloon, go into anaphylactic shock, or suffer any other serious complication in flight? I'm guessing I know the answer, but still.
​​​​​​A nut allergy should not be an issue with peanuts as peanuts are not nuts. The peanut is a legume
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Old Sep 27, 22, 12:31 pm
  #113  
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Originally Posted by MrSyslogd View Post
2006 or so flying out of PHX-CLT this exactly happened. On the board at the gate was "NUT FREE FLIGHT." The gate agents were on the PA every 5-10min reminding people that Peanuts were not allowed on this flight. No Peanuts, No Candy with Peanuts, No Peanut Butter, etc...... People were requested to show any food they are brining on with them to validate. It was serious stuff. But at least US was very open and repeating the danger Peanuts would be on this fight.
But, peanuts ARE NOT nuts, they are legumes
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Old Sep 27, 22, 12:49 pm
  #114  
 
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What if she were suffering from claustrophobia?

It's a good thing this lady wasn't claustrophic. What would she have demanded then???
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Old Sep 27, 22, 2:37 pm
  #115  
 
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Originally Posted by mvoight View Post
But, peanuts ARE NOT nuts, they are legumes
As someone who grew up in Virginia, yes they are not Nuts.
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Old Sep 27, 22, 4:18 pm
  #116  
 
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Originally Posted by marcopizzaiuolo View Post
Also, a recent accident on a BA flight:
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...id-flight.html
Originally Posted by marcopizzaiuolo View Post
You are right that it is to do with food labelling and point of sale information, but also food preparation and food service, which catering onboard is part of. Also this has caused many UK business to opt on the side of caution and adopt stricter allergen policy than even required by law. Finally? the parents of Natasha are campaigning for more widespread allergen related law changes as illustrated in the article I posted above
I remember the story in the article when it was first posted on here. It was a nonsense then, and it is a nonsense now. I cant believe anyone would seriously advocate for a law to ban eating nuts on a plane, something that there is zero evidence in support of (unlike labelling food for allergens which has some basis in fact). Its ironic that their stated intention is to rid the world of allergies, given that theres some evidence that these kind of knee jerk, non evidence based policies actually increase rates allergy and deaths from allergic reactions
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Old Sep 27, 22, 11:37 pm
  #117  
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Originally Posted by M60_to_LGA View Post
These people who claim they're going to die if they so much as look at a peanut on an airplane - I have a really hard time believing that, I'm sorry.
This. Cross contamination of food is a very real issue, but nuts aren't going to reach out and attack you through the air.

Originally Posted by Stripe View Post
There are no peanuts in the AA nut mix, and I doubt there was anything in on any of the meal trays that would have triggered a peanut allergy. Aren't most nut allergies specific to peanuts?
Peanuts are not nuts, a nut allergy has nothing to do with them. However, peanut allergy is also possible.

Originally Posted by UKtravelbear View Post
Because its impossible to make a plane an allergy free zone,

You could have a kid 3 days before eating a packet of nuts and they wipe their hands on the seat, the armrest, tray table, even under the seat and in the seat pocket and so on and its impossible to clean every single area that thoroughly.
This. If the threat is airborne and previous use of the space has occurred you have to protect yourself, it's not feasible to remove the threat from the environment. If an N95 isn't good enough go P100 half-face respirator.

Originally Posted by pwd847 View Post
I don't want to turn this into a covid discussion, but isn't covid the same idea? Peanut/covid could be airborne, but the cabin air is filtered and reinjected every 2-3 minutes. Pretty sure there are almost no cases of covid tied to being in your seat on a plane. Therefore(one could assume) peanut dust, which is a much larger mass, also shouldn't be flying around like a heat seeking missile guided straight for people's lungs.

The one difference is if meals are served to all passengers. You could pretty much guarantee there is a lot more peanut dust present than covid virus.
Covid is a far, far greater threat because it's released in tiny particles.
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Old Sep 29, 22, 8:20 am
  #118  
 
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Nut allergy fiasco

Originally Posted by PUCCI GALORE View Post
Thank you my Love for articulating exactly what I am thinking. I am fed up to the back teeth with these people who sort of enforce on you their problem. I wish them no harm but they are in a minority and need to take that into their thinking. If your allergy is that acute, Madam, should you be travelling at all? Why should the majority of us be held hostage to the nut allergy - what next? All that said, maybe the airlines should try and avoid nut snacks in place of something else? Just a thought.
One would assume that if her allergy is that significant, she would be carrying an Epi-Pen.

I, too, have a problem with this issue, and I am in the medical field. And, I have family members who do have food allergies. I am familiar with the risks of allergies (rash, anaphylaxis, gastrointestinal problems, etc.)

Should this passenger also "require" that the airlines do a decontamination of nuts and nut powders that might remain from the previous flight?

Maybe the cleaning crew and the air crew should be decontaminated, also. Hey, while you are at it, perhaps the airports need to be decontaminated in case anyone brought nut powder in from home. Don't forget the seats in the waiting areas and the restrooms and the boarding jet bridges.

One could suggest that the food vendors should also not be allowed to have potential allergy-producing products for sale.

Should the airlines avoid nut snacks though? Nope. Other snacks (crackers, dried fruit, etc.) might be processed in a manufactory that also processes nuts. To get snacks that are completely free of potential allergy-producing components is truly not only a monumental idea, but an impractical and impossible one.
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Old Oct 23, 22, 2:55 pm
  #119  
 
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Originally Posted by fdog View Post
I know it's 2 days into this conversation...but...

I grew up on a boat. Most of my diet was seafood, including fresh-caught crab...I would dive for lobster...etc.

2 years ago, I became allergic to shellfish, something I was raised on, and love.

Since then, if I smell (or see) lobster, shrimp, etc, being cooked, I salivate and feel sad. No bad responses otherwise, except a huge longing.

On the other hand, EATING is a different situation, as I know from firsthand experience. If I eat a steak that was cooked on the same side of the grill as lobster or shellfish, there is a 911 call in my future. And a whack with epi.

All the best, James
Yep, same here. I reacted to scallops as a kid, but for years and years at lobster, shrimp, Little Necks, crab cakes, you name it. Until one day I reacted. Badly. I'm the same way with cross contamination with both shellfish and many tree nuts.

A suggestion--Make allergy cards in multiple languages that you can carry when you travel. Mine are about the size of a credit card, laminated, strung together on a keyring attached to an obnoxious lanyard. Laminated so they can be taken to the cook in the kitchen. Keyring and lanyard so the server won't forget to return them to me.
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Old Oct 23, 22, 3:15 pm
  #120  
 
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Originally Posted by Annerk View Post
A suggestion--Make allergy cards in multiple languages that you can carry when you travel. Mine are about the size of a credit card, laminated, strung together on a keyring attached to an obnoxious lanyard. Laminated so they can be taken to the cook in the kitchen. Keyring and lanyard so the server won't forget to return them to me.
I dont know if they still do this, but this was precisely the procedure at Starbucks in Japan a number of years ago.
I ordered soy milk with my latte because Im lactose-intolerant. The cashier handed me a card that I was supposed to give the barista when my drink was ready. Presumably to jog their memory that they should have used soy milk. Here in the US, I usually hover around where they are making the drinks because its pretty much 50/50 whether they use regular milk or soy/almond in my drink.
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