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-   American Airlines | AAdvantage (https://www.flyertalk.com/forum/american-airlines-aadvantage-733/)
-   -   Denied Boarding b/c of Computer Problem -- Compensation (https://www.flyertalk.com/forum/american-airlines-aadvantage/2077682-denied-boarding-b-c-computer-problem-compensation.html)

Lux Flyer May 1, 22 8:02 am

Even though IDB regulations do not apply. Can you not pursue a civil action if you have suffered some damages due to AAs computer error?

unfrequentflyer May 1, 22 8:13 am

You are cutting it too close. After 911 I was told to arrive 90 minute before flight time for domestic and 2 hour for international. Before 911 I used to wake up an hour before morning flight to YYZ

Antarius May 1, 22 8:29 am


Originally Posted by unfrequentflyer (Post 34211288)
You are cutting it too close. After 911 I was told to arrive 90 minute before flight time for domestic and 2 hour for international. Before 911 I used to wake up an hour before morning flight to YYZ

2 hours? Why?

There's zero evidence that arrival and check in time had anything to do with this

unfrequentflyer May 1, 22 8:44 am


Originally Posted by Antarius (Post 34211316)
2 hours? Why?

There's zero evidence that arrival and check in time had anything to do with this

You noticed that security line got longer after 911, right?

I just got this from the AA website

https://www.aa.com/i18n/travelInform...fk-airport.jsp

Antarius May 1, 22 10:16 am


Originally Posted by unfrequentflyer (Post 34211336)
You noticed that security line got longer after 911, right?

I just got this from the AA website

https://www.aa.com/i18n/travelInform...fk-airport.jsp

9/11 was 20 years ago. Yes, security changed, but it's changed a lot in the 20 years as well. If you have TSA Pre and/or clear, the line is quite quick.

Regardless, the issue here was with the OPs ticket, not security.

nineworldseries May 1, 22 2:44 pm


Originally Posted by unfrequentflyer (Post 34211336)
You noticed that security line got longer after 911, right?

I just got this from the AA website

https://www.aa.com/i18n/travelInform...fk-airport.jsp

You're certainly living up to your username with these posts!

js1993 May 1, 22 6:16 pm


Originally Posted by Antarius (Post 34210988)
They eat into margin. Pricing is largely set by the market. A European airline isn't going to be charging markedly more than what the competitor charges for an equivalent market.

What would be an "equivalent market" to Europe?

The required EU comp is factored into baseline pricing just like labor and other expenses. It's no different than "free" breakfast at a hotel.

ijgordon May 1, 22 6:54 pm

Non-EU based airlines are only 50% subject to EC261, when departing. So in theory on a portion of the market for intercontinental flights, it does have to come out of the margin of the EU-based airlines (or is a windfall for the non-EU airlines who may decide to charge higher fares in line with the market.) .

TravelerMSY May 1, 22 9:55 pm

You should get some comp as a customer service gesture for the delay being AA’s fault. You’ll have to ask for it,

I’d also press for an explanation of what went wrong and what can be done to prevent it from happening again,

jordyn May 2, 22 1:27 pm


Originally Posted by Antarius (Post 34210988)
They eat into margin. Pricing is largely set by the market. A European airline isn't going to be charging markedly more than what the competitor charges for an equivalent market.

Every time someone talks about costs just being passed along to their customers, I wonder if they've ever taken at least five minutes to learn about the most basic elements of the supply/demand curve. Sure, an increase in costs might push an airline to want to charge passengers more for the same flight, but customers get to choose what prices they'll accept as well, so unless demand is completely inelastic, they can't increase prices without reducing the number of tickets they'll be able to sell. The reality is that prices will probably increase somewhat, but some of it will come out of margins as well.

But we don't have to have this conversation on a theoretical basis. There's been actual studies of the topic, and the most recent data from the EU [PDF] shows that the cost to airlines is something like 4 Euros per passenger. So even if the full cost were directly passed on to the passenger, it's way cheaper than the private insurance offerings that US airlines push, which often wouldn't cover the sort of disruption in the OP in any case.

js1993 May 2, 22 1:52 pm


Originally Posted by jordyn (Post 34214637)
Every time someone talks about costs just being passed along to their customers, I wonder if they've ever taken at least five minutes to learn about the most basic elements of the supply/demand curve. Sure, an increase in costs might push an airline to want to charge passengers more for the same flight, but customers get to choose what prices they'll accept as well, so unless demand is completely inelastic, they can't increase prices without reducing the number of tickets they'll be able to sell. The reality is that prices will probably increase somewhat, but some of it will come out of margins as well.

But we don't have to have this conversation on a theoretical basis. There's been actual studies of the topic, and the most recent data from the EU [PDF] shows that the cost to airlines is something like 4 Euros per passenger. So even if the full cost were directly passed on to the passenger, it's way cheaper than the private insurance offerings that US airlines push, which often wouldn't cover the sort of disruption in the OP in any case.

Anyone who has run even a lemonade stand knows that prices have a floor that is set in large part by fixed costs. The idea that "4 euros per passenger" is something the airlines don't worry about when it comes to pricing is simply absurd. These are the same people who took magazines off planes because the bean-counters showed them it would save on fuel.

jayer May 2, 22 3:58 pm

I'll Probably Hate Myself For Jumping Into an Emotionally Charged Thread; But. . . .
 

Originally Posted by TLVflyer (Post 34210163)
Friends,

I was travelling from PHX to LHR and arrived at the check-in desk 90 minutes before departure. For an inexplicable reason, the agent could not check us in, prompting calls to their support team, back and forth to the gate and even to London. Five agents worked on it diligently, and got it to work and then not work and then work, etc, until they sent the flight without us.

They could not have been nicer, but we were denied boarding involuntarily and were delayed in our arrival by 24 hours.

All of the online sites that I read -- including the USDOT and AA websites -- describe Denied Boarding Compensation in the context of oversold flights. This was not an oversell -- but it was 100% AA's fault, and their faulty system caused our delay and our inconvenience.

What are the rules here? Can I ask for compensation? Will I get it? How much is it for? How do I do it? Anyone have experience with this?

Thank you!

Why didn't you check in from home the day before? At least I thought last time we went to London they let me do so online.

TomMM May 2, 22 8:28 pm


Originally Posted by jayer (Post 34215117)
Why didn't you check in from home the day before? At least I thought last time we went to London they let me do so online.

Maybe it failed?

nk15 May 2, 22 8:41 pm


Originally Posted by jayer (Post 34215117)
Why didn't you check in from home the day before? At least I thought last time we went to London they let me do so online.

How would they check themselves in from home when 5 gate agents couldn't do it?

VegasGambler May 2, 22 11:07 pm

And in fairness, a failed OLCI doesn't really mean much. My success rate for international OLCI is about 50% and I've never run into an issue like this.


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